Ezzard Charles

Last updated

Ezzard Charles
Ezzard Charles 2.jpg
Charles in his prime in 1950
Statistics
Real nameEzzard Mack Charles
Nickname(s)
  • Cincinnati Cobra
Weight(s)
Height6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Reach73 in (185 cm)
Born(1921-07-07)July 7, 1921
Lawrenceville, Georgia, U.S.
DiedMay 28, 1975(1975-05-28) (aged 53)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights121
Wins95
Wins by KO52
Losses25
Draws1
Medal record
Men's amateur boxing
Representing Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Cincinnati Golden Gloves
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 1937 Cincinnati Welterweight
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1938 Cincinnati Welterweight
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1939 Cincinnati Middleweight
Chicago Golden Gloves
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1939 Chicago Middleweight
Ohio District AAU Championships
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1937 Cincinnati Welterweight
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1938 Cincinnati Welterweight
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1939 Cincinnati Middleweight
National AAU Championships
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1939 San Francisco Middleweight

Ezzard Mack Charles (July 7, 1921 – May 28, 1975), known as the Cincinnati Cobra, was an American professional boxer and World Heavyweight Champion. Known for his slick defense and precision, he is often considered the greatest light heavyweight boxer of all time. [1] As of May 2021, BoxRec ranks Charles as the second greatest boxer of all time, pound for pound, behind Floyd Mayweather Jr. [2] [3] Charles defeated numerous Hall of Fame fighters in three different weight classes. Charles retired with a record of 95 wins, 25 losses and 1 draw. He was posthumously inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 1990. [4]

Contents

Career

Charles was born in Lawrenceville, Georgia, and grew up in Cincinnati. [5] Charles graduated from Woodward High School in Cincinnati, Ohio where he was already becoming a well-known fighter. [6] Known as "The Cincinnati Cobra", Charles fought many notable opponents in both the light heavyweight and heavyweight divisions, eventually winning the World Championship in the latter. Although he never won the Light Heavyweight title, The Ring has rated him as the greatest light heavyweight of all time. [7]

Career beginnings and military service

Charles started his career as a featherweight in the amateurs, where he had a record of 42–0. In 1938, he won the Diamond Belt Middleweight Championship. He followed this up in 1939 by winning the Chicago Golden Gloves tournament of champions. He won the national AAU Middleweight Championship in 1939. He turned professional in 1940, knocking out Melody Johnson in the fourth round. Charles won all of his first 17 fights before being defeated by veteran Ken Overlin. Victories over future Hall of Famers Teddy Yarosz and the much avoided Charley Burley had started to solidify Charles as a top contender in the middleweight division. However, he served in the U.S. military during World War II and was unable to fight professionally in 1945.

World heavyweight champion

He returned to boxing after the war as a light heavyweight, picking up many notable wins over leading light heavyweights, as well as heavyweight contenders Archie Moore, Jimmy Bivins, Lloyd Marshall and Elmer Ray. Shortly after his knock-out of Moore in their third and final meeting, tragedy struck. Charles fought a young contender named Sam Baroudi, knocking him out in Round 10. Baroudi died of the injuries he sustained in this bout. Charles was so devastated he almost gave up fighting. Charles was unable to secure a title shot at light heavyweight and moved up to heavyweight. After knocking out Joe Baksi and Johnny Haynes, Charles won the vacant National Boxing Association Heavyweight title when he outpointed Jersey Joe Walcott over 15 rounds on June 22, 1949. The following year, he outpointed his idol and former World Heavyweight Champion Joe Louis to become the recognized Lineal Champion. Successful defenses against Walcott, Lee Oma and Joey Maxim followed.

Charles vs. Marciano

In 1951, Charles fought Walcott a third time and lost the title by knockout in the seventh round. Charles lost a controversial decision in their fourth and final bout. If Charles had won this fight, he would have become the first man in history to regain the heavyweight championship. Remaining a top contender with wins over Rex Layne, Tommy Harrison and Coley Wallace, Charles knocked out Bob Satterfield in an eliminator bout for the right to challenge Heavyweight Champion Rocky Marciano. His two stirring battles with Marciano are regarded as ring classics. In the first bout, held in Yankee Stadium on June 17, 1954, he valiantly took Marciano the distance, going down on points in a vintage heavyweight bout. Charles is the only man ever to last the full 15-round distance against Marciano. Marciano won a unanimous decision. Referee Ruby Goldstein scored the bout 8-5-2 in rounds for the champion. Judge Artie Aidala scored the fight 9-5-1 while judge Harold Barnes' tally was 8-6-1. Nevertheless, a number of fans and boxing writers felt that Charles deserved the decision. [8] In their September rematch, Charles landed a severe blow that actually split Marciano's nose in half. Marciano's cornermen were unable to stop the bleeding and the referee almost halted the contest until Marciano rallied with an eighth-round knockout.

Later career

Financial problems forced Charles to continue fighting, losing 13 of his final 23 fights (he held a record of 83 wins, 12 losses and 1 draw before financial problems became a factor in his career). He retired with a record of 93-25-1 (52 KOs). He avenged 7 losses in his career.

Personal

Charles was very close with Rocky Marciano and a neighbor and friend of Muhammad Ali when they both lived on 85th Street in Chicago. [9] Charles also starred in one motion picture: Mau Mau Drums, an independent (and unreleased) jungle-adventure film shot in and around Cincinnati in 1960 by filmmaker Earl Schwieterman.

Death

In 1968, Charles was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The disease affected Charles' legs and eventually left him completely disabled. A fund raiser was held to assist Charles and many of his former opponents spoke on his behalf. Rocky Marciano in particular called Charles the bravest man he ever fought. The former boxer spent his last days in a nursing home. A chilling 1973 commercial showed Charles in his wheelchair horribly disabled by ALS. [10] [ citation needed ] Charles died on May 28, 1975, in Chicago.

Legacy

Commemorative stamp honoring Charles Ezzard Charles.jpg
Commemorative stamp honoring Charles

In 1976, Cincinnati honored Charles by changing the name of Lincoln Park Drive to Ezzard Charles Drive. This was the street of his residence during the height of his career. [11]

In 2002, Charles was ranked No. 13 on The Ring magazine's list of the 80 Best Fighters of the Last 80 Years.

In 2006, Ezzard Charles was named the 11th greatest fighter of all time by the IBRO (International Boxing Research Organisation). [12]

The "Cincinnati Cobra" was a master boxer of extraordinary skill and ability. He had speed, agility, fast hands and excellent footwork. Charles possessed a masterful jab and was a superb combination puncher. He was at his peak as a light-heavyweight. His record is quite impressive. Against top rate opposition like Archie Moore, Charley Burley, Lloyd Marshall, Jimmy Bivins, and Joey Maxim he was an impressive 16-2 combined. Despite being a natural light-heavy he won the heavyweight title and made 9 successful title defenses. Nearly 25% of voters had Charles in the top 10. Half of the voters had him in the top 15. Two thirds of voters had him inside the top 20.

In 2007, ESPN online ranks Ezzard Charles as the 27th greatest boxer of all time, ahead of such notable fighters as Mike Tyson, Larry Holmes and Jake LaMotta. [13]

In 2009, Boxing magazine listed Ezzard Charles as the greatest Light Heavyweight fighter ever, ahead of the likes of Archie Moore, Bob Foster, Michael Spinks and Gene Tunney. [14]

Prominent boxing historian Bert Sugar listed Charles as the seventh greatest Heavyweight of all time.

Professional boxing record

Professional record summary
121 fights95 wins25 losses
By knockout527
By decision4317
By disqualification01
Draws1
No.ResultRecordOpponentTypeRound, timeDateLocationNotes
121Loss95–25–1Alvin GreenUD10Sep 1, 1959 Municipal Auditorium, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S.
120Loss95–24–1George LoganKO8 (10), 1:50Jul 30, 1959Fairgrounds Arena, Boise, Idaho, U.S.
119Win95–23–1Dave AshleyTKO9 (10)Jul 3, 1959 Lincoln Heights High School, Lincoln Heights, California, U.S.
118Loss94–23–1Donnie FleemanKO6 (10), 2:13Oct 27, 1958 Dallas Memorial Auditorium, Dallas, Texas, U.S.
117Loss94–22–1 Alfredo Zuany UD10Aug 28, 1958Plaza de Toros, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico
116Win94–21–1Johnny HarperUD10Aug 28, 1958East-West Stadium, Fairmont, West Virginia, U.S.
115Loss93–21–1 Dick Richardson DQ2 (10)Oct 2, 1956 Harringay Arena, London, England
114Loss93–20–1 Harry Matthews UD10Aug 31, 1956 Sick's Stadium, Seattle, Washington, U.S.
113Loss93–19–1Pat McMurtryUD10Jul 13, 1956 Lincoln Bowl, Tacoma, Washington, U.S.
112Win93–18–1Bob AlbrightRTD6 (10)Jun 19, 1956Softball Park, Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.
111Loss92–18–1Wayne BetheaUD10May 21, 1956 St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
110Win92–17–1Don JasperTKO9 (10), 2:46Apr 21, 1956 Windsor Arena, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
109Loss91–17–1Young Jack JohnsonTKO6 (10)Dec 29, 1955Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
108Win91–16–1Bob AlbrightSD10Dec 22, 1955Cow Palace, Daly City, California, U.S.
107Win90–16–1Toxie HallUD10Dec 6, 1955 Rochester War Memorial Auditorium, Rochester, New York, U.S.
106Loss89–16–1Toxie HallSD10Nov 14, 1955 Rhode Island Auditorium, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.
105Loss89–15–1 Tommy Jackson UD10Aug 31, 1955Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
104Loss89–14–1 Tommy Jackson UD10Aug 3, 1955 War Memorial Auditorium, Syracuse, New York, U.S.
103Win89–13–1Paul AndrewsSD10Jul 13, 1955Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
102Win88–13–1John HolmanUD10Jun 8, 1955Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
101Loss87–13–1John HolmanTKO9 (10), 2:48Apr 27, 1955Miami Beach Exhibition Hall, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S.
100Win87–12–1Vern EscoeKO3 (10), 2:15Apr 11, 1955 Edmonton Gardens, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
99Win86–12–1Charley NorkusUD10Feb 18, 1955Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
98Loss85–12–1 Rocky Marciano KO8 (15), 2:36Sep 17, 1954Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S.For NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
97Loss85–11–1 Rocky Marciano UD15Jun 17, 1954Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S.For NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
96Win85–10–1 Bob Satterfield KO2 (10)Jan 13, 1954Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
95Win84–10–1 Coley Wallace KO10 (10), 2:43Dec 16, 1953 San Francisco Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, California, U.S.
94Loss83–10–1 Harold Johnson SD10Sep 8, 1953 Connie Mack Stadium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
93Loss83–9–1 Niño Valdés UD10Aug 11, 1953 Miami Beach Exhibition Hall, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S.
92Win83–8–1Larry WatsonKO5 (10), 2:50May 26, 1953 Milwaukee Arena, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.
91Win82–8–1Billy GilliamUD10May 12, 1953 Toledo Sports Arena, Toledo, Ohio, U.S.
90Win81–8–1 Rex Layne UD10Apr 1, 1953 Winterland Arena, San Francisco, California, U.S.
89Win80–8–1Tommy HarrisonTKO9 (10)Feb 4, 1953Olympia Stadium, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
88Win79–8–1Wes BascomTKO9 (10), 2:34Jan 14, 1953 St. Louis Arena, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.
87Win78–8–1Frank BufordTKO7 (10), 2:13Dec 15, 1952 Boston Garden, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
86Win77–8–1 Jimmy Bivins UD10Nov 26, 1952Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
85Win76–8–1Cesar BrionUD10Oct 24, 1952Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
84Win75–8–1Bernie ReynoldsKO2 (12), 1:40Oct 8, 1952Cincinnati Gardens, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
83Loss74–8–1 Rex Layne PTS10Aug 8, 1952 Ogden Stadium, Ogden, Utah, U.S.
82Loss74–7–1 Jersey Joe Walcott UD15Jun 5, 1952 Philadelphia Municipal Stadium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.For NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
81Win74–6–1Joe KahutKO8 (12), 1:40Dec 12, 1951 Pacific Livestock Pavilion, Portland, Oregon, U.S.
80Win73–6–1 Joey Maxim UD12Dec 12, 1951Cow Palace, Daly City, California, U.S.
79Win72–6–1 Rex Layne TKO11 (12)Oct 10, 1951Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
78Loss71–6–1 Jersey Joe Walcott KO7 (15), 0:55Jul 18, 1951Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.Lost NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
77Win71–5–1 Joey Maxim UD15May 30, 1951Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
76Win70–5–1 Jersey Joe Walcott UD15Mar 7, 1951 Olympia Stadium, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
75Win69–5–1Lee OmaTKO10 (15), 1:19Jan 12, 1951Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
74Win68–5–1 Nick Barone KO11 (15), 2:06Dec 5, 1950Cincinnati Gardens, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
73Win67–5–1 Joe Louis UD15Sep 27, 1950Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S.Retained NBA heavyweight title;
Won vacant NYSAC and The Ring heavyweight titles
72Win66–5–1Freddie BeshoreTKO14 (15), 2:53Aug 15, 1950Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.Retained NBA heavyweight title
71Win65–5–1Pat ValentinoKO8 (15), 0:35Oct 14, 1949 Cow Palace, Daly City, California, U.S.Retained NBA heavyweight title
70Win64–5–1 Gus Lesnevich RTD7 (15)Aug 10, 1949 Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S.Retained NBA heavyweight title
69Win63–5–1 Jersey Joe Walcott UD15Jun 22, 1949 Comiskey Park, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.Won vacant NBA heavyweight title
68Win62–5–1 Joey Maxim MD15Feb 28, 1949 Cincinnati Gardens, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
67Win61–5–1Johnny HaynesKO8 (10)Feb 7, 1949 Philadelphia Arena, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
66Win60–5–1 Joe Baksi TKO11 (15), 2:33Dec 10, 1948Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
65Win59–5–1Walter HaferKO7 (10)Nov 15, 1948Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
64Win58–5–1 Jimmy Bivins UD10Sep 13, 1948 Griffith Stadium, Washington, D.C., U.S.
63Win57–5–1Erv SarlinUD10May 20, 1948Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
62Win56–5–1 Elmer Ray KO9 (10), 2:43May 7, 1948Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
61Win55–5–1 Sam Baroudi KO10 (10)Feb 20, 1948 Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.Baroudi died of injuries sustained in the fight. [15]
60Win54–5–1 Archie Moore KO8 (15), 2:40Jan 13, 1948Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
59Win53–5–1Fitzie FitzpatrickKO4 (12), 1:34Dec 2, 1947Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
58Win52–5–1Teddy RandolphUD10Nov 3, 1947Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
57Win51–5–1Clarence JonesKO1 (10), 2:41Oct 27, 1947Radio Center Arena, Huntington, West Virginia, U.S.
56Win50–5–1Al SmithTKO4 (10), 1:11Oct 16, 1947Armory, Akron, Ohio, U.S.
55Win49–5–1 Lloyd Marshall KO2 (10), 2:25Sep 29, 1947Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
54Win48–5–1Joe MatisiUD10Sep 16, 1947 Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
53Loss47–5–1 Elmer Ray SD10Jul 25, 1947 Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
52Win47–4–1Fitzie FitzpatrickKO5 (10), 2:43Jul 14, 1947Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
51Win46–4–1 Archie Moore MD10May 5, 1947Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
50Win45–4–1Erv SarlinUD10Apr 14, 1947Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
49Win44–4–1 Jimmy Bivins KO4 (10), 1:17Mar 10, 1947Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
48Win43–4–1Oakland Billy SmithKO5 (12), 1:38Feb 17, 1947Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
47Win42–4–1 Jimmy Bivins UD10Nov 12, 1946Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
46Win41–4–1Oakland Billy SmithUD10Sep 23, 1946Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
45Win40–4–1 Lloyd Marshall KO6 (10), 0:57Jul 29, 1946Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
44Win39–4–1Shelton BellKO5 (10), 2:24Jun 13, 1946 Idora Park, Youngstown, Ohio, U.S.
43Win38–4–1 Archie Moore UD10May 20, 1946Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
42Win37–4–1Tommy HubertKO4 (10), 1:49May 13, 1946Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
41Win36–4–1George ParksTKO6 (10)Apr 15, 1946Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
40Win35–4–1Billy DuncanKO4 (10), 1:27Apr 1, 1946Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
39Win34–4–1Tommy HubertUD10Mar 25, 1946Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
38Win33–4–1Al SheridanKO2 (10), 2:57Feb 18, 1946Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
37Win32–4–1Al BarlowPTS3Dec 16, 1944Brancaccio Theater, Esquilino, Rome, ItalyWon Inter-Allied light heavyweight title
36Win31–4–1Stanley GoiczPTS3Dec 13, 1944 Brancaccio Theater, Esquilino, Rome, Italy
35Loss30–4–1 Lloyd Marshall TKO8 (10), 0:25Mar 31, 1943Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
34Loss30–3–1 Jimmy Bivins UD10Jan 7, 1943Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
33Win30–2–1 Joey Maxim UD10Dec 1, 1942 Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
32Win29–2–1 Joey Maxim UD10Oct 27, 1942 Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
31Win28–2–1Mose BrownKO6 (10), 2:51Sep 15, 1942Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
30Win27–2–1Jose BasoraKO5 (10), 2:57Aug 17, 1942Hickey Park, Millvale, Pennsylvania, U.S.
29Win26–2–1Booker BeckwithKO9 (10), 2:19Jul 27, 1942Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
28Win25–2–1Steve MamakosKO1 (10), 2:46Jul 14, 1942Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
27Win24–2–1 Charley Burley PTS10Jun 29, 1942Hickey Park, Millvale, Pennsylvania, U.S.
26Win23–2–1 Charley Burley UD10May 25, 1942 Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
25Loss22–2–1Kid TuneroUD10May 13, 1942Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
24Win22–1–1Billy PryorPTS10Apr 8, 1942Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
23Draw21–1–1 Ken Overlin MD10Mar 2, 1942Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
22Win21–1 Anton Christoforidis TKO3 (10), 2:42Jan 12, 1942Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
21Win20–1 Teddy Yarosz UD10Nov 17, 1941Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
20Win19–1Pat ManginiKO1 (10), 2:50Oct 13, 1941Parkway Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
19Win18–1Al GilbertTKO5 (10), 3:00Jul 21, 1941Parkway Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
18Loss17–1 Ken Overlin UD10Jun 9, 1941 Crosley Field, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
17Win17–0Rudy KozolePTS10May 12, 1941Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
16Win16–0Joe SutkaPTS10Mar 31, 1941Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
15Win15–0Floyd HowardKO7 (10)Mar 10, 1941Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
14Win14–0Slaka CavrichKO2 (10)Feb 24, 1941Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
13Win13–0Billy BengalUD10Feb 10, 1941Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
12Win12–0Charley JeromeKO3 (10)Dec 2, 1940Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
11Win11–0Marty SimmonsPTS10Oct 1, 1940Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
10Win10–0Billy HoodKO2 (10)Sep 23, 1940Music Hall Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
9Win9–0John ReevesPTS4Aug 5, 1940 Haft's Acre, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.
8Win8–0Carl TurnerPTS6Jun 29, 1940Parkway Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
7Win7–0Young Kid AshKO3 (6), 1:20Jun 17, 1940Legion Hall, Portsmouth, Ohio, U.S.
6Win6–0Frankie WilliamsTKO5 (8), 3:00Jun 13, 1940Parkway Arena, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
5Win5–0Charley BanksKO1 (6), 1:42Jun 3, 1940Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
4Win4–0Charley BanksPTS6May 20, 1940Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
3Win3–0Remo FernandezPTS6Apr 3, 1940Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
2Win2–0John ReevesPTS6Mar 27, 1940 Cincinnati Music Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
1Win1–0Melody JohnsonKO4 (4)Mar 12, 1940Armory, Middletown, Pennsylvania, U.S.

See also

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James Louis Bivins, was an American heavyweight boxer whose professional career ran from 1940 to 1955. He was born in Dry Branch, Georgia. Although he was never given the opportunity to fight for a world title, despite at one point being the number one contender in both the light heavyweight and heavyweight divisions, Bivins fought and defeated many of the great fighters of his era and won the "Duration" Light Heavyweight and Heavyweight titles. Fifteen of Bivins' victorious fights were rated 5-Star by BoxRec, including six at heavyweight. In recognition of his achievements in the ring - among other things, he defeated eight of the eleven world champions he faced - Bivins was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1999. He was also the one-time husband of Dollree Mapp, the subject of prominent Supreme Court case regarding the rights of search and seizures.

Rex Gessel Layne was a former heavyweight professional boxer. Sometimes termed the "Lewiston Larruper," the top rated Layne never fought for the heavyweight title, but notched victories over such greats as future world champions Ezzard Charles and Jersey Joe Walcott.

Joe Baksi American boxer

Joe Baksi was a top heavyweight contender who defeated fighters such as Tami Mauriello, Lee Savold, Lou Nova, and Freddie Mills, while losing decisions to Jersey Joe Walcott and Ezzard Charles.

Kid Norfolk American boxer

Kid Norfolk was an American professional boxer who fought as a Light Heavyweight and Heavyweight from 1910 through 1926, holding wins over many notable boxers of his day including Joe Jeanette, Billy Miske, Jack Blackburn, Harry Greb, Tiger Flowers, Battling Siki, and Gunboat Smith. Norfolk was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2007.

References

  1. Staff, BN (July 7, 2019). "On This Day: Ezzard Charles, one of the greatest fighters of all-time, was born". Boxing News . Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  2. "BoxRec's Annual Ratings: P4P Annuals". BoxRec. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  3. "BoxRec ratings: world, pound-for-pound, active and inactive". BoxRec. Retrieved July 22, 2020.
  4. "Boxing Hall of Fame names first inductees". UPI.
  5. "Ezzard Charles". Cyber Boxing Zone. Retrieved May 8, 2014.
  6. Newsmakers Interview with Ezzard Charles Jr., WKRC Channel 12, Cincinnati, August 17, 2008
  7. Detloff, William (September 2002). "The 20 Greatest Light Heavyweights of All-Time". The Ring . Vol. 81 no. 10. p. 50.
  8. Will Hammock. "The Champ: County to honor legendary boxer Charles today." Gwinnett Daily Post. June 5, 2010
  9. Newsmakers interview with Ezzard Charles Jr., WKRC Channel 12 Cincinnati, August 17, 2008
  10. "1970's Muscular Dystrophy Commercial with Ezzard Charles". YouTube. March 4, 2013. Retrieved July 29, 2020.
  11. Guide to 20th Century African American Resources, Cincinnati Historical Society
  12. "IBRO'S 25 Greatest Fighters of All Time". Eastsideboxing.com. Retrieved May 8, 2014.
  13. "All-Time Greatest Boxers". ESPN. March 8, 1971. Retrieved May 8, 2014.
  14. "The Greatest Light Heavyweights of All Time". Archived from the original on September 14, 2009.
  15. "Sam Baroudi". BoxRec.

Further reading

Achievements
Vacant
Title last held by
Joe Louis
NBA Heavyweight Champion
June 22, 1949 – July 18, 1951
Succeeded by
Jersey Joe Walcott
NYSAC Heavyweight Champion
September 27, 1950 – July 18, 1951
The Ring Heavyweight Champion
September 27, 1950 – July 18, 1951
World Heavyweight Champion
June 16, 1951 – July 18, 1951