Félix Tshisekedi

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Félix Tshisekedi
Felix Tshisekedi (september 2018).jpg
5th President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Assumed office
24 January 2019 [1]
Prime Minister Bruno Tshibala
Preceded by Joseph Kabila
Leader of the Union for Democracy and Social Progress
Assumed office
31 March 2018
Preceded by Étienne Tshisekedi
Personal details
Born (1963-06-13) 13 June 1963 (age 55)
Léopoldville, Congo-Léopoldville (now Kinshasa, DR Congo)
Political party Union for Democracy and Social Progress
Spouse(s) Denise Nyakéru Tshisekedi
Parents Étienne Tshisekedi
(father)
Marthe Kasalu Jibikila
(mother)

Félix Antoine Tshisekedi Tshilombo [2] (French:  [feliks ɑ̃twan tʃizək(ə)di tʃilɔ̃bo] ; born 13 June 1963) [3] is a Congolese politician who has been the President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 24 January 2019. [4] He is the leader of the Union for Democracy and Social Progress (UDPS), the oldest and largest party of the Democratic Republic of Congo. [5] He is also the son of late Étienne Tshisekedi, a three-time Prime Minister of Zaire and opposition leader. Tshisekedi was the UDPS party's candidate for president in the December 2018 general election, which he won, despite accusations of irregularities from European and Catholic Church election monitoring organizations. His victory was upheld by the Constitutional Court of the DRC after another opposition politician, Martin Fayulu, challenged the result. Recently, he has named his coalition partner and political heavyweight, Vital Kamerhe, as his Chief of Cabinet. [6]

President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo head of state of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

The President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is the head of state of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and commander-in-chief of the armed forces.

Union for Democracy and Social Progress (Democratic Republic of the Congo) political party

The Union for Democracy and Social Progress is one of the major contemporary political parties in the Democratic Republic of the Congo along with MLC. The party has the lengthiest record of continuous operation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Étienne Tshisekedi Democratic Republic of Congo Prime Minister

Étienne Tshisekedi wa Mulumba was a Congolese politician and the leader of the Union for Democracy and Social Progress (UDPS), the main opposing political party in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). A long-time opposition leader, he served as Prime Minister of the country on three brief occasions: in 1991, 1992–1993, and 1997.

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Early life and education

Tshisekedi was born in Léopoldville on 13 June 1963 to mother Marthe and father Étienne Tshisekedi, who served as Prime Minister of Zaire in the 1990s. [7] Félix Tshisekedi had a comfortable life as a youth in the capital. However, when his father created the UDPS in the early 1980's, publicly opposing Mobutu, Félix was forced to accompany his dissident father into house arrest in his native village in central Kasaï. This led to him putting his studies on hold. In 1985, Mobutu authorised him, his mother, and his brothers to leave Kasaï. He went on to live in Brussels, Belgium, where he worked at odd jobs and became an active UDPS militant. [3]

Kinshasa Capital in Democratic Republic of the Congo

Kinshasa is the capital and the largest city of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The city is situated alongside the Congo River.

Mobutu Sese Seko President of Zaïre

Mobutu Sese Seko Kuku Ngbendu Wa Za Banga was the military dictator and President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo from 1965 to 1997. He also served as Chairman of the Organisation of African Unity in 1967–1968.

The Kasai region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo is divided administratively into Kasai-Occidental and Kasai-Oriental. It shares its name with the Kasai River.

Political career

In late 2008, Tshisekedi was named as the UDPS National Secretary for external relations. [8] In November 2011, he obtained a seat in the National Assembly, representing the city of Mbuji Mayi in Kasai-Oriental province. He did not take his seat citing a fraudulent election[ citation needed ] and his mandate was invalidated for "absenteeism". [8]

National Assembly (Democratic Republic of the Congo) lower house of parliament in Democratic Republic of the Congo

The National Assembly is the lower house and main legislative political body of the Parliament of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was established by the 2006 constitution.

Kasai-Oriental Province in Kasai region, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Kasai-Oriental is one of the 26 provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Specified under Article 2 of the country's 2006 Constitution, the new province was finally created in 2015 from Tshilenge District and the independently administered city of Mbuji-Mayi, both part of the larger, pre-2015 Kasai-Oriental province. The new province's territory corresponds to the historic Sud-Kasaï province that existed in the early period of post-colonial Democratic Republic of the Congo between 1963 and 1966.

In May 2013, he refused a position of rapporteur at the Independent National Electoral Commission (CENI), saying that he did not want to put his political career on hold [9] as CENI's article 17 excludes membership for those who are members of a political formation. [8]

A rapporteur is a person who is appointed by an organization to report on the proceedings of its meetings. The term is a French-derived word.

Independent National Electoral Commission (Democratic Republic of the Congo) election commission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Independent National Electoral Commission is the body that runs elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

In October 2016, Tshisekedi became vice secretary general of the UDPS. [8] On 31st March 2018, he was elected to lead the UDPS, after his father's death on 1st February 2017. [10] The very same day, he was chosen by his party to be the UDPS presidential candidate in the general election that took place on 30th December 2018. [2]

On 10 January 2019, it was announced Tshisekedi had been elected President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the elections held on 30 December 2018. [4] He defeated another opposition leader, Martin Fayulu, and Emmanuel Ramazani Shadary, who was supported by term-limited outgoing president Joseph Kabila who has been president for eighteen years. Fayulu, the runner-up, alleged rigging and challenged the election results. [11] On 19th January, the challenge was dismissed by the Constitutional Court, officially making Tshisekedi president-elect. [12] He was officially sworn in as President on January 24th, 2019. [1] South Africa, on 20th January congratulated Felix Tshisekedi on becoming president of DR Congo despite the African Union and EU warning of doubts over the result announced by the Constitutional Court. [13] After Tshisekedi was sworn in, it was reported that a member of Kabila's coalition would be picked to serve as his Prime Minister. [14] [15]

2018 Democratic Republic of the Congo general election General elections

General elections were held in the Democratic Republic of the Congo on 30 December 2018, to determine a successor to President Joseph Kabila, as well as for the 500 seats of the National Assembly and 715 provincial council seats. It was announced on 10 January 2019 that Félix Tshisekedi (UDPS) won with 38.6% of the vote, defeating another opposition candidate, Martin Fayulu, and Emmanuel Ramazani Shadary, backed by the ruling party PPRD. Fayulu alleged that the vote was rigged against him in a deal made by Tshisekedi and outgoing President Kabila, challenging the result in the DRC's Constitutional Court. Different election observers, including those from the country's Roman Catholic Church, also cast doubt on the official result. Nonetheless on 20 January the Court rejected his appeal and declared Tshisekedi as the winner. Parties supporting President Kabila won the majority of seats in the National Assembly. Félix Tshisekedi was sworn in as the 5th President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo on 24 January 2019, making it the first peaceful transition of power in the country since it became independent from Belgium in 1960.

Martin Fayulu Congolese politician

Martin Madidi Fayulu is a businessman and lawmaker from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He is the leader of the Engagement for Citizenship and Development party. On 11 November 2018, he was chosen by seven opposition leaders to be their joint presidential candidate in the 2018 Democratic Republic of the Congo general election. However, within 24 hours, Félix Antoine Tshisekedi Tshilombo, the eventual winner of the 2018 presidential election and Vital Kamerhe, the other oppositional candiate, rescinded their endorsement of his candidacy and formed their own pact with Tshisekedi as candidate.

Emmanuel Ramazani Shadary is a politician in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, who was a presidential candidate in the December 2018 presidential elections in the country. He was selected following consultations within the ruling People's Party for Reconstruction and Democracy (PPRD) political party and the Common Front for Congo (FCC), political coalition. Shadary is the permanent secretary of the PPRD, and has previously served as the country's Interior Minister.

On 13 March 2019, Tshisekedi signed a decree to pardon approximately 700 prisoners, including imprisoned political opponents of Kabila. [16]

Related Research Articles

The region that is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo was first settled about 80,000 years ago. The Kingdom of Congo remained present in the region between the 14th and the early 19th centuries. Belgian colonization began when King Leopold II founded the Congo Free State, a corporate state run solely by King Leopold. Reports of widespread murder and torture in the rubber plantations led the Belgian government to seize the Congo from Leopold II and establish the Belgian Congo. Under Belgian rule numerous Christian organizations attempted to Westernize the Congolese people.

Zaire country in Africa now known as the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Zaire, officially the Republic of Zaire, was the name of a sovereign state between 1971 and 1997 in Central Africa that is now known as Democratic Republic of the Congo. The country was a one-party totalitarian dictatorship, run by Mobutu Sese Seko and his ruling Popular Movement of the Revolution party. Zaire was established following Mobutu's seizure of power in a military coup in 1965, following five years of political upheaval following independence known as the Congo Crisis. Zaire had a strongly centralist constitution, and foreign assets were nationalised. The period is sometimes referred to as the Second Congolese Republic.

Joseph Kabila President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Joseph Kabila Kabange is a Congolese politician who served as President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo between January 2001 and January 2019. He took office ten days after the assassination of his father, President Laurent-Désiré Kabila. He was elected as President in 2006 and re-elected in 2011 for a second term. Since stepping down after the 2018 election, Kabila, as a former president, will be a senator for life, according to the Constitution of the DRC.

Léon Kengo wa Dondo Democratic Republic of the Congo politician

Léon Kengo wa Dondo is a Congolese politician who served as the "first state commissioner" several times under Mobutu Sese Seko in Zaïre. He was one of the most powerful figures in the regime and was a strong advocate of economic globalization and free-market economics. Since 2007, he has been President of the Senate of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Direct elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo occur for the Presidency, National Assembly, and provincial assemblies. The Senate, the upper house of the legislature, is elected indirectly by members of the provincial assemblies.

Antoine Gizenga Congolese Prime Minister, candidate for President

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Nzanga Mobutu Democratic Republic of the Congo politician

François-Joseph Mobutu Nzanga Ngbangawe is a Congolese politician. A son of the long-time President Mobutu Sese Seko, he served in the government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo under President Joseph Kabila from 2007 to 2011, initially as Minister of State for Agriculture and subsequently as Deputy Prime Minister for Basic Social Needs. He was dismissed from the government in March 2011.

Vital Kamerhe leader of the UNC party

Vital Kamerhe is a Congolese politician and leader of the Union for the Congolese Nation, an opposition political party. He was President of the National Assembly of the Democratic Republic of the Congo from 2006 to 2009. After resigning from that office, he went into opposition and founded the UNC. Kamerhe was a candidate in the 2011 presidential election.

2011 Democratic Republic of the Congo general election election

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Médard Mulangala Lwakabwanga is a politician from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He is President of the Union for a Republican Majority and a leader of the Union Sacree pour l’Alternance, an umbrella grouping of opposition parliamentary parties and community groups that forms the third-largest political structure within the opposition and Rapporteur of the National Assembly’s Committee on Economics and Finance, making him the opposition’s lead spokesman on budgetary, economic and investment policy in the Republic.

Modeste Mutinga Mutuishayi, commonly known as Modeste Mutinga, is a journalist and senator of the Democratic Republic of Congo. He is the publisher of Le Potentiel, which The Committee to Protect Journalists described as "the only independent daily newspaper in the war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo". According to Mutinga, the paper has "an agenda" of promoting economic development and democracy.

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Nicolas Kazadi Nicolas Kazadi is a Congolese politician and economist, who is currently Ambassador-at-large for President Tshisekedi.

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References

  1. 1 2 "REFILE-Opposition leader Felix Tshisekedi sworn in as Congo president". 24 January 2019 via af.reuters.com.
  2. 1 2 "Félix Tshisekedi investi candidat du parti historique d'opposition UDPS en RDC" (in French). Voice of America. 31 March 2018. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  3. 1 2 Boisselet, Pierre (15 June 2017). "RDC : Félix Tshisekedi, au nom du père". Jeune Afrique (in French). Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  4. 1 2 "Opposition named winner in DR Congo poll". BBC News. 10 January 2019. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  5. Clowes, William (25 May 2018). "Congo Opposition Leaders Mull Unity Candidate for Delayed Vote". Bloomberg News . Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  6. "DRC president Tshisekedi names coalition ally as Chief of Staff" . Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  7. Williame, Jean-Claude; et al. (1997). Zaire: Predicament and Prospects. DIANE Publishing. p. 3. ISBN   0-7881-7042-2.
  8. 1 2 3 4 "Félix Tshisekedi Premier ministre à la place de Samy Badibanga?". Politico.cd (in French). 23 December 2016. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  9. " Je ne tiens pas à mettre ma carrière politique entre parenthèses "
  10. "Tshisekedi's son leads DRC's main opposition party". The Herald . 2 April 2018. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  11. "Surprise Winner of Congolese Election Is An Opposition Leader". NPR. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  12. Bujakera, Stanys (January 19, 2019). "Congo top court declares Tshisekedi winner of presidential poll". Reuters. Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  13. "SA urges 'all parties' to accept Tshisekedi's DRC win" . Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  14. Steinhauser, Gabriele; Norman, Laurence (24 January 2019). "Félix Tshisekedi Is Sworn In as Congolese President" via www.wsj.com.
  15. "DR Congo: Tshisekedi takes office, but Kabila's legacy casts long shadow". France 24. 24 January 2019.
  16. "New Congolese President Pardons About 700 Political Prisoners". NPR.org. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
Political offices
Preceded by
Joseph Kabila
President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
2019–present
Incumbent