FAB-9000

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FAB-9000 at Ryazan Museum of Long-Range Aviation Museum of Long-Range Aviation (340-28).jpg
FAB-9000 at Ryazan Museum of Long-Range Aviation

FAB-9000 (ФАБ-9000) was a very large 9,000 kg (19,842 lb) conventional high explosive bomb developed early in the Cold War. [1] The bombs were used by the Iraqi Air Force during the Iran-Iraq war, being dropped from Tu-22 Blinder bombers on military, industrial and civilian targets.

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References

  1. "FAB 9000 High Explosive Bomb". www.globalsecurity.org. Retrieved 23 January 2019.