FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

Last updated

FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
Founded2002;17 years ago (2002)
RegionInternational (FIFA)
Number of teams16 (Finals)
Current championsFlag of Japan.svg  Japan
(1st title)
Most successful team(s)Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
(3 titles each)
Soccerball current event.svg 2020 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup is an international association football tournament, organized by FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association), for national teams of women under the age of 20. The tournament is held in even-numbered years. It was first conducted in 2002 as the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship with an upper age limit of 19. In 2006, the age limit was raised to the current 20. The event was renamed as a World Cup effective with the 2008 competition, making its name consistent with FIFA's other worldwide competitions for national teams.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is a non-profit organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and efootball. It is the highest governing body of football.

Contents

Starting with the 2010 edition, tournaments held in years immediately preceding the FIFA Women's World Cup are awarded as part of the bidding process for the Women's World Cup. In those years, the U-20 Women's World Cup serves as a dry run for the host nation of the Women's World Cup, a role similar to that of the FIFA Confederations Cup in the men's game.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

The FIFA Confederations Cup was an international association football tournament for men's national teams, held every four years by FIFA. It was contested by the holders of each of the six continental championships, along with the current FIFA World Cup holder and the host nation, to bring the number of teams up to eight.

Qualification

Every continental governing body has its own qualifying tournament. Usually their continental championship is used as a qualifier.

ConfederationChampionship
AFC (Asia) AFC U-19 Women's Championship
CAF (Africa) African U-20 Cup of Nations for Women
CONCACAF (North, Central America and Caribbean) CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship
CONMEBOL (South America) South American Under-20 Women's Football Championship
OFC (Oceania) OFC U-20 Women's Championship
UEFA (Europe) UEFA Women's U-19 Championship

History

2002

The first women's world championship at the youth level, held as the 2002 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship, with an age limit of 19, was hosted by Canada. The final, held at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, drew a surprisingly large crowd of 47,000 to watch the hosts play the United States. The US defeated Canada 1–0 on a golden goal by Lindsay Tarpley. Canada's Christine Sinclair was the adidas Golden Ball recipient, as tournament MVP, and the Golden Shoe (10 goals) winner.

2002 FIFA U-19 Womens World Championship

The 2002 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship was held from 17 August to 1 September. It was the first sanctioned youth tournament for women put together by FIFA. The tournament was hosted by Canada. FIFA granted the tournament to Canada in March 2001. Three cities hosted the tournament, Edmonton, Vancouver, and Victoria. Canada's Christine Sinclair won the Golden Ball as the tournament's best player and the Golden Shoe as top-scorer.

Commonwealth Stadium (Edmonton) Stadium in Edmonton, Alberta

Commonwealth Stadium, also known as The Brick Field at Commonwealth Stadium during Eskimos events, is an open-air, all-seater multipurpose stadium located in the McCauley neighbourhood of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. It has a seating capacity of 55,819, making it the largest open-air stadium in Canada. It has been used for Canadian football, athletics, soccer, and rugby union, as well as concerts.

Canada womens national under-20 soccer team national association football team

The Canada U-20 women's national soccer team is a youth soccer team operated under the Canadian Soccer Association. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the full women's national team. Their most recent major competition was the 2018 CONCACAF Women's U-20 Championship.

2004

The 2004 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship was held in Thailand. For the second time in a row, the current holders of the adult World Cup, Germany, won the youth competition. The Golden Ball went to Brazilian star, Marta, while for the second time the Golden Boot went to a Canadian, Brittany Timko.

The 2004 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship was held from 10 to 27 November 2004. It was the second edition of the youth tournament for women put together by FIFA, before being renamed FIFA U-20 Women's World Championship for the 2006 edition. The tournament was hosted by Thailand, in two stadiums in Bangkok, one in Chiang Mai and another in Phuket. This was the first FIFA women's tournament held in Southeast Asia.

Thailand Constitutional monarchy in Southeast Asia

Thailand, officially the Kingdom of Thailand and formerly known as Siam, is a country at the centre of the Southeast Asian Indochinese peninsula composed of 76 provinces. At 513,120 km2 (198,120 sq mi) and over 68 million people, Thailand is the world's 50th-largest country by total area and the 21st-most-populous country. The capital and largest city is Bangkok, a special administrative area. Thailand is bordered to the north by Myanmar and Laos, to the east by Laos and Cambodia, to the south by the Gulf of Thailand and Malaysia, and to the west by the Andaman Sea and the southern extremity of Myanmar. Its maritime boundaries include Vietnam in the Gulf of Thailand to the southeast, and Indonesia and India on the Andaman Sea to the southwest. It is a unitary state. Although nominally the country is a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy, the most recent coup, in 2014, established a de facto military dictatorship under a junta.

The Germany women's national under-20 football team represents the female under-20s of Germany in the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, and is controlled by the German Football Association.

2006

FIFA raised the women's youth championship age limit to 20 to match the men's, beginning with the 2006 FIFA U-20 Women's World Championship, held in Russia from 17 August through 3 September.

2006 FIFA U-20 Womens World Championship

The 2006 FIFA U-20 Women's World Championship was held in Russia from 17 August to 3 September 2006. It was the officially recognized world championship for women's under-20 national association football teams. Matches were held in four Moscow stadiums and one in Saint Petersburg.

Russia transcontinental country in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia

Russia, or the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country in Eastern Europe and North Asia. At 17,125,200 square kilometres (6,612,100 sq mi), Russia is, by a considerable margin, the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with about 146.79 million people as of 2019, including Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital, Moscow, is one of the largest cities in the world and the second largest city in Europe; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. However, Russia recognises two more countries that border it, Abkhazia and South Ossetia, both of which are internationally recognized as parts of Georgia.

The competition was held in four Moscow stadiums (Dinamo, Lokomotiv, Podmoskovie Stadium and Torpedo Stadion) and one in St. Petersburg (Petrovskiy Stadion).

FC Dynamo Moscow Russian association football club based in Moscow

FC Dynamo Moscow is a Russian football club based in Moscow. Dynamo has returned to the Russian Premier League for the 2017–18 season after one season in the second-tier Russian Football National League.

Podmoskovie Stadium, situated in the suburb of Shchelkovo some 15 km from the centre of Moscow, is one of the oldest stadia in Russia. The Russian word Podmoskovye means "Moscow Region".

Eduard Streltsov Stadium multi-purpose stadium in Moscow, Russia

Eduard Streltsov Stadium, formerly Torpedo Stadium, is a multi-purpose stadium in Moscow, Russia. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of Torpedo Moscow.

Korea DPR won the final 5–0 over China PR.

2008

The 2008 FIFA U-20 Women's World Championship was held in Chile, from 20 November to 7 December 2008. [1]

Six years after winning their first championship at the youth level in 2002, the United States reclaimed the trophy with a 2–1 win over defending champions Korea DPR. The Golden Ball and the Golden Shoe went to Sydney Leroux of the United States.

2010

The 2010 edition of the tournament was held in Germany from 13 July to 1 August 2010. The host nation defeated Nigeria in the final to claim its second championship. It was the first time that an African nation had advanced as far as the semifinals. It was also the first tournament in which four different confederations were represented in the semifinals. The Golden Ball and Golden Shoe awards both went to Alexandra Popp of Germany.

2012

The 2012 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was played in Japan from 19 August to 8 September, [2] after initially having a hosting bid from Vietnam withdrawn and a bid from Uzbekistan rejected. The Golden Ball award went to Dzsenifer Marozsán of Germany and Golden Shoe award went to Kim Un-hwa of North Korea.

2014

The 2014 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was held in Canada from 5–25 August 2014, who reprised its role as host after a Zimbabwean bid withdrew leaving the Canadian bid unopposed. The Golden Ball and Golden Shoe awards both went to Asisat Oshoala of Nigeria.

2016

The 2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was expected to be held in South Africa, but due to the country's withdrawal, a new host was chosen on 19 March 2015, and it was Papua New Guinea. [3]

2018

The 2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was held in France from 5–24 August 2018; a year later France would host the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. The Golden Ball and Golden Shoe awards both went to Patricia Guijarro of Spain.

Results

EditionYearHostFinalThird place matchNumber of teams
ChampionsScoreRunners-upThird placeScoreFourth place
12002
Details
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Flag of the United States.svg
United States
1–0
asdet
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
1–1
(4–3 PSO)
Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
12
22004
Details
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China PR
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
3–0Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
12
32006
Details
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
5–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China PR
Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
0–0 a.e.t.
(6–5 PSO)
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
16
42008
Details
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2–1Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
5–3Flag of France.svg
France
16
52010
Details
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2–0Flag of Nigeria.svg
Nigeria
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
1–0Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
16
62012
Details
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Flag of the United States.svg
United States
1–0Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
2–1Flag of Nigeria.svg
Nigeria
16
72014
Details
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
1–0 a.e.t. Flag of Nigeria.svg
Nigeria
Flag of France.svg
France
3–2Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
16
82016
Details
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea Flag of North Korea.svg
North Korea
3–1Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
1–0Flag of the United States.svg
United States
16
92018
Details
Flag of France.svg  France Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
3–1Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of England.svg
England
1–1
(4–2 PSO)
Flag of France.svg
France
16
102020
Details [4]
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 16
Map of countries' best results Womens World Cup U-20 countries best results.png
Map of countries' best results

Winners

CountryWinnersRunners-upThird PlaceFourth Place
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3 (2004, 2010, 2014)1 (2012)2 (2002, 2008)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3 (2002, 2008, 2012)1 (2004)2 (2006, 2016)
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 2 (2006, 2016)1 (2008)1 (2014)
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1 (2018)2 (2012, 2016)
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 2 (2010, 2014)1 (2012)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China PR 2 (2004, 2006)
Flag of France.svg  France 1 (2016)1 (2014)2 (2008, 2018)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1 (2002)
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1 (2018)
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1 (2006)2 (2002, 2004)
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 1 (2010)
Flag of England.svg  England 1 (2018)
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 1 (2010)

Awards

Golden Shoe

The topscorer award.

TournamentWinnerGoals
2002 Canada Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Christine Sinclair 10
2004 Thailand Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Brittany Timko 7
2006 Russia Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Ma Xiaoxu 5
2008 Chile Flag of the United States.svg Sydney Leroux 5
2010 Germany Flag of Germany.svg Alexandra Popp 10
2012 Japan Flag of North Korea.svg Kim Un-Hwa 7
2014 Canada Flag of Nigeria.svg Asisat Oshoala 7
2016 Papua New Guinea Flag of Japan.svg Mami Ueno 5
2018 France Flag of Spain.svg Patricia Guijarro 6
Golden Ball

Awarded to the best player of the tournament.

TournamentWinner
2002 Canada Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Christine Sinclair
2004 Thailand Flag of Brazil.svg Marta
2006 Russia Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Ma Xiaoxu
2008 Chile Flag of the United States.svg Sydney Leroux
2010 Germany Flag of Germany.svg Alexandra Popp
2012 Japan Flag of Germany.svg Dzsenifer Marozsán
2014 Canada Flag of Nigeria.svg Asisat Oshoala
2016 Papua New Guinea Flag of Japan.svg Hina Sugita
2018 France Flag of Spain.svg Patricia Guijarro
Adidas Golden Glove

Awarded to the best goalkeeper.

TournamentWinner
2008 Chile Flag of the United States.svg Alyssa Naeher
2010 Germany Flag of the United States.svg Bianca Henninger
2012 Japan Flag of Germany.svg Laura Benkarth
2014 Canada Flag of Germany.svg Meike Kämper
2016 Papua New Guinea Flag of France.svg Mylène Chavas
2018 France Flag of England.svg Sandy MacIver
Fair Play Award
TournamentWinner
2002 CanadaFlag of Japan.svg  Japan
2004 ThailandFlag of the United States.svg United States
2006 RussiaFlag of Russia.svg  Russia
2008 ChileFlag of the United States.svg United States
2010 GermanyFlag of South Korea.svg  South Korea
2012 JapanFlag of Japan.svg  Japan
2014 CanadaFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
2016 Papua New GuineaFlag of Japan.svg  Japan
2018 FranceFlag of Japan.svg  Japan

Comprehensive team results in each World Cup

Legend

For each tournament, the flag of the host country and the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 2002
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
(12)
2004
Flag of Thailand.svg
(12)
2006
Flag of Russia.svg
(16)
2008
Flag of Chile.svg
(16)
2010
Flag of Germany.svg
(16)
2012
Flag of Japan.svg
(16)
2014
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
(16)
2016
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
(16)
2018
Flag of France.svg
(16)
2020
Flag of Nigeria.svg
(16)
Total
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina R1R1R13
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia QFQFR13
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 4th4th3rdQFR1R1R1QFR19
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2ndQFR1R1R1QFR17
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile R11
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 2nd2ndR1R1R1R16
Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei R11
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 4th1
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica R1R12
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark QF1
Flag of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.svg  DR Congo R1R12
Flag of England.svg  England QFQFR1R13rd5
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland R1R12
Flag of France.svg  France R1QF4thR13rd2nd4thq8
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3rd1stQF3rd1st2nd1stQFQFq10
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana R1R1R1R1R15
Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti R11
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy R1R12
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan QFQFR13rd3rd1st6
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico R1R1R1QFQFR1QFR18
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands QFq2
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand R1R1R1R1QFR1R1q8
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria R1QFQFQF2nd4th2ndR1QFq10
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 1st2ndQFQF4th1stQF7
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway R1QF2
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea R11
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay R1R12
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia QFQF2
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea R13rdQFQFR15
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain R1QF2ndq4
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden QFR12
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland R1R1R13
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand R11
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1st3rd4th1stQF1stQF4thR19
Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela R11

See also

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