FIFA Women's World Rankings

Last updated
FIFA Women's World Rankings as of 7 December 2018. [1]
Top 20 rankings as of 7 December 2018 [1]
RankChangeTeamPoints
1Steady2.svgFlag of the United States.svg  United States 2123
2Steady2.svgFlag of Germany.svg  Germany 2057
3Increase2.svg 1Flag of France.svg  France 2046
4Decrease2.svg 1Flag of England.svg  England 2021
5Steady2.svgFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2006
6Steady2.svgFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 1999
7Increase2.svg 3Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1987
8Decrease2.svg 1Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1984
9Steady2.svgFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1976
10Decrease2.svg 2Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1964
11Steady2.svgFlag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 1938
12Steady2.svgFlag of Spain.svg  Spain 1920
13Steady2.svgFlag of Norway.svg  Norway 1902
14Steady2.svgFlag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 1880
15Steady2.svgFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1871
16Increase2.svg 1Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1859
17Decrease2.svg 1Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1842
18Steady2.svgFlag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1832
19Increase2.svg 1Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 1819
20Decrease2.svg 1Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1810
*Change from 28 September 2018
Complete rankings at FIFA.com

The FIFA Women's World Rankings for football were introduced in 2003, [2] with the first rankings published in March of that year, as a follow-on to the existing FIFA World Rankings for men. They attempt to compare the strength of internationally active women's national teams at any given time.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

FIFA World Rankings world ranking list

The FIFA World Ranking is a ranking system for men's national teams in association football, currently led by Belgium. The teams of the member nations of FIFA, football's world governing body, are ranked based on their game results with the most successful teams being ranked highest. The rankings were introduced in December 1992, and eight teams have held the top position, of which Brazil have spent the longest ranked first.

Contents

Specifics of the ranking system

France womens national football team womens national association football team representing France

The French women's national football team is directed by the French Football Federation (FFF). The team competes as a member of UEFA in various international football tournaments such as the FIFA Women's World Cup, UEFA Women's Euro, the Summer Olympics, and the Algarve Cup.

Netherlands womens national football team Womens national association football team representing the Netherlands

The Netherlands women's national football team is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

The first two points result from the FIFA Women's World Rankings system being based on the Elo rating system adjusted for football; in 2018, FIFA modified the men's ranking system to similarly be based on Elo systems after continued criticism. FIFA considers the ratings for teams with fewer than 5 matches provisional and at the end of the list. Also any team that plays no matches for 18 months becomes unranked.

Elo rating system method for calculating the relative skill levels of players in zero-sum games such as chess

The Elo rating system is a method for calculating the relative skill levels of players in zero-sum games such as chess. It is named after its creator Arpad Elo, a Hungarian-American physics professor.

Leaders

FIFA Women's
World Ranking leaders

FIFA Women's World Rankings

To date Germany and the United States have been the only two teams to have led the rankings. They have also held the top two spots in all but five releases, when Germany was ranked third: Norway was in second position in the first two rankings until Germany overtook them by winning the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, Brazil was ranked second in March and June 2009 until Germany won 2009 Euro and rejoined the top two, and England reached the #2 ranking in March 2018.

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by Germany. They won their first women's world title and became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup. The men's team had won the World Cup three times at the time.

The Brazil women's national football team played their first game on 22 July 1986 against the United States, losing 2–1.

The United States holds the record for the longest period being ranked first: almost 7 years, from March 2008 to December 2014.

In the latest rankings, action from Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments in UEFA and CONCACAF, as well as the 2018 Tournament of Nations, caused movement throughout the rankings, though three of the top five did not change. The United States (#1), Germany (#2), and Canada (#5) retained their positions while England (#3) and France (#4) swapped. Australia rose to #6 on a 33-point gain, the largest gain among any of the top 50 teams, though Uganda earned the most points of any team with 44. [3]

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided all 24 teams which will play in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the hosts France qualifying automatically. It will be the eighth FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament will be the third to be hosted in Europe, after the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany.

The European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football competition that determined the eight UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts France in the final tournament.

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship qualification is a women's football competition which decides the participating teams of the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Ranking procedure

The rankings are based on the following formulae: [2]

Where

= The team rating after the match
= The team rating before the match
= , the weighted importance of the match
= The actual result of the match, see below
= The expected result of the match
= The scaled difference in rating points between the teams
= The opposing team's rating before the match
= The "home advantage" correction, see below
= A scaling factor, see below
= The "Match Importance Factor", see below

The average points of all teams are about 1300 points. The top nations usually exceed 2000 points. In order to be ranked, a team must have played at least 5 matches against officially ranked teams, and have not been inactive for more than 18 months. Even if teams are not officially ranked, their points rating is kept constant until they play their next match.

Actual result of the match

The main component of the actual result is whether the team wins, loses, or draws, but goal difference is also taken into account.

If the match results in a winner and loser, the loser is awarded a percentage given by the accompanying table, with the result always less than or equal to 20% (for goal differences greater than zero). The result is based on the goal difference and the number of goals they scored. The remaining percentage points are awarded to the winner. For example, a 2–1 match has the result awarded 84%–16% respectively, a 4–3 match has the result awarded 82%–18%, and an 8–3 match has the result awarded 96.2%–3.8%. As such, it is possible for a team to lose points even if they win a match, assuming they did not "win by enough".

If the match ends in a draw the teams are awarded the same result, but the number depends on the goals scored so the results will not necessarily add up to 100%. For example, a 0–0 draws earns both teams 47% each, a 1–1 draw earns 50% each, and a 4–4 draw earns 52.5% each. [2]

Actual result table

The following is from a non-winning perspective (loss or draw). The factor for the winning team adds up to 100.

Goal Difference
0123456 /+
Goals scored
by non winning team
Actual result (percentage)
0471584321
150168.94.83.72.61.5
251179.85.64.43.22
3521810.76.45.13.82.5
452.51911.67.25.84.43
5532012.586.553.5

And from a winning perspective.

Goal Difference
123456 /+
Goals scored
by losing team
Actual result (percentage)
0859296979899
18491.195.296.397.498.5
28390.294.495.696.898
38289.393.694.996.297.5
48188.492.894.295.697
58087.59293.59596.5

Source [2]

Neutral ground or Home vs. Away

Historically, home teams earn 66% of the points available to them, with away teams earning the other 34%. To account for this, when two teams are not playing on neutral ground, the home team has its inflated by 100 points for the purposes of calculation. That is, if two equally ranked teams playing at one team's home ground, the home team would be expected to win at the same rate a team playing on neutral ground with a 100-point advantage. This 100 point difference corresponds to a 64%–36% advantage in terms of expected result.

This also helps define the scaling constant , which has a value of 200. In addition to a 100-point difference causing an expected result difference of 64%–36%, it also results in a 300-point difference causing expected results of 85%–15%. [2]

Importance of the match

Match importanceMatch importance
factor (M)
K-value
FIFA Women's World Cup match460
Women's Olympic football tournament 460
FIFA Women's World Cup qualifier 345
Women's Olympic football qualifier345
Women's Continental finals match345
Women's Continental qualifier230
Women's friendly match between two Top 10 teams230
Women's friendly match115

Ranking schedule

Rankings are published four times a year, usually on a Friday. [4]

2018 Rankings schedule
Release date
23 March
22 June
28 September
7 December

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 1 2 "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 7 December 2018. Retrieved 7 December 2018.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 "Fact Sheet, FIFA Women's World Ranking" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-06-08.
  3. FIFA.com (28 September 2018). "Matildas on the march as USA stay top". fifa.com.
  4. "Women's Ranking Procedure". FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking. FIFA . Retrieved 11 January 2018.