FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1939

Last updated
FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1939
Host city Zakopane
Country Poland
Events 6
Opening ceremony 12 February 1939 (1939-02-12)
Closing ceremony 15 February 1939 (1939-02-15)
<  Engelberg 1938 Cortina d'Ampezzo 1941  >
Relief Map of Poland.svg
Red pog.svg
Zakopane 

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1939 were held 12–15 February at Kasprowy Wierch in the Western Tatras, south of Zakopane, Poland. Due to World War II, these were the last official championships for nine years, until the 1948 Winter Olympics.
Josef Jennewein, Wilhelm Walch and Helga Gödl were Austrians but after the Anschluss in 1938 they were citizen of Nazi-Germany. The medals which they did win do still count for Germany. Hellmuth Lantschner also was an Austrian but he did change to Germany in 1935 and did start for the German Ski Federation since that time.

Kasprowy Wierch peak in the Western Tatras between Slovakia and Poland

Kasprowy Wierch is a peak of a long crest (ridgeline) in the Western Tatras one of Poland's main winter ski areas. Its dominant southern crests, WSW and ESE, mark the border with Slovakia. It is accessible in most conditions by foot and daily by cablecar.

Western Tatras mountain range in Europe

The Western Tatras are mountains in the Tatras, part of the Carpathian Mountains, located on the Polish-Slovak borders. The mountains border the High Tatras in the east, Podtatranská kotlina in the south, Choč Mountains in the west and Rów Podtatrzański in the north. The main ridge is 37 kilometers long and the mountain range contains 31 two-thousanders.

Zakopane Place in Lesser Poland, Poland

Zakopane is a town in the extreme south of Poland, in the southern part of the Podhale region at the foot of the Tatra Mountains. From 1975 to 1998 it was part of Nowy Sącz Province; since 1999 it has been part of Lesser Poland Province. As of 2016 its population was 27,424.

Contents

Medal summary

Men's events

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Downhill [1] Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Hellmut Lantschner Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Josef Jennewein Flag of Switzerland.svg Karl Molitor
Slalom [2] Flag of Switzerland.svg Rudolf Rominger Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Josef Jennewein Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Wilhelm Walch
Combined [3] Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Josef Jennewein Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Wilhelm Walch Flag of Switzerland.svg Rudolf Rominger

Women's events

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Downhill [4] Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Christl Cranz Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Lisa Resch Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Helga Gödl
Slalom [5] Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Christl Cranz Flag of Switzerland.svg Gritli Schaad Flag of Sweden.svg May Nilsson
Combined [6] Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Christl Cranz Flag of Switzerland.svg Gritli Schaad Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg Lisa Resch

Medal table

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Flag of the German Reich (1935-1945).svg  Germany 5 4 3 12
2 Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1 2 2 5
3 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 0 0 1 1
Total 6 6 6 18

Related Research Articles

Downhill (ski competition) alpine skiing discipline

Downhill is a form of alpine skiing competition. Whereas the other alpine skiing events emphasize turning and technique, downhill emphasizes "the six components of technique, courage, speed, risk, physical condition and judgement", according to the FIS "International Ski Competition Rules (ICR)". Speeds of up to 130 km/h (81 mph) are common in international competition. Athletes must have an aerodynamically efficient tuck position to minimize drag and increase speed.

Super-G racing discipline of alpine skiing

Super giant slalom, or super-G, is a racing discipline of alpine skiing. Along with the faster downhill, it is regarded as a "speed" event, in contrast to the technical events giant slalom and slalom. It debuted as an official World Cup event during the 1983 season and was added to the official schedule of the World Championships in 1987 and the Winter Olympics in 1988.

Alpine skiing at the Winter Olympics

Alpine skiing has been contested at every Winter Olympics since 1936, when a combined event was held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.

Combined is an event in alpine ski racing. A traditional combined competition consists of one run of downhill and two runs of slalom, each discipline run on separate days. The winner is the skier with the fastest aggregate time. A modified version, the super combined, is a speed race and only one run of slalom, with both portions scheduled on the same day.

The 39th World Cup season began in October 2004 in Sölden, Austria, and concluded in March 2005 at the World Cup finals in Lenzerheide, Switzerland. The overall winners were Bode Miller of the U.S. and Anja Pärson of Sweden.

The 37th World Cup season began in October 2002 on Sölden, Austria, and concluded in March 2003 at the World Cup finals in Lillehammer, Norway. The overall winners were Stephan Eberharter of Austria and Janica Kostelić of Croatia.

The 25th World Cup season began in August 1990 in New Zealand, resumed in December, and concluded in March 1991 in the United States. The overall winners were Marc Girardelli of Luxembourg, his fourth title and Petra Kronberger of Austria. This was the first season following the reunification of Germany and the last before the dissolution of Yugoslavia.

The 22nd World Cup season began in November 1987 in Italy and concluded in March 1988 in Austria. The overall champions were Pirmin Zurbriggen and Michela Figini, both of Switzerland. Zurbriggen won his third overall title; Figini her second.

The 21st World Cup season began in August 1986 in Argentina for men, resumed in late November, and concluded in March 1987 in Sarajevo. The overall champions were Pirmin Zurbriggen and Maria Walliser, both of Switzerland, who each won for the second time. Two-time women's overall World Cup champion Erika Hess of Switzerland retired at the end of the season.

The 13th World Cup season began in December 1978 in Austria and concluded in March 1979 in Japan.

The 4th World Cup season began in December 1969 in France and concluded in March 1970 in Norway. Karl Schranz of Austria won his second consecutive overall title. Michèle Jacot of France won the women's overall title.

FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1999 1999 edition of the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1999 were held February 2–14 in Vail and Beaver Creek, Colorado, U.S.A..

2008–09 FIS Alpine Ski World Cup 2008–2009 season of the FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup

The 43rd World Cup season began in late October 2008 in Sölden, Austria, and concluded in mid-March 2009, at the World Cup finals in Åre, Sweden.

FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1932 1932 edition of the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1932 were held 4–6 February in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy. These were the second world championships and the combined event was added to the program. The first edition was held the prior year in Mürren, Switzerland.

FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2015 2015 edition of the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2015 were the 43rd FIS Alpine World Ski Championships, held from 2–15 February in the United States at Vail / Beaver Creek, Colorado.

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1933 in alpine skiing were held in Innsbruck, Austria in February 1933.

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1936 were held in Innsbruck, Austria in February 1936.

2012–13 FIS Alpine Ski World Cup 2012–2013 season of the FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup

The 47th World Cup season began on 27 October 2012, in Sölden, Austria, and concluded on 17 March 2013, at the World Cup finals in Lenzerheide, Switzerland. The overall titles were won by Marcel Hirscher of Austria and Tina Maze of Slovenia.

FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017 2017 edition of the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017 were the 44th FIS Alpine World Ski Championships and were held from 6 to 19 February 2017 at Piz Nair in St. Moritz, Switzerland. The host city was selected at the FIS Congress in South Korea, on 31 May 2012. The other finalists were Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy, and Åre, Sweden.

2016–17 FIS Alpine Ski World Cup 2016–2017 season of the FIS Alpine Skiing World Cup

The International Ski Federation (FIS) Alpine Skiing World Cup is the premier circuit for alpine skiing competition. The inaugural FIS World Cup season launched 52 years ago in January 1967 and this 51st season began on 22 October 2016 in Sölden, Austria, and concluded in the United States at Aspen on 19 March 2017. The biennial World Championships interrupted the tour in early February in Saint Moritz, Switzerland. The season-ending finals in March were held in North America for the first time in two decades: the last finale in the U.S. was in 1997 at Vail.

References

  1. "Men's Downhill Results". FIS . Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  2. "Men's Slalom Results". FIS . Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  3. "Men's Combined Results". FIS . Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  4. "Women's Downhill Results". FIS . Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  5. "Women's Slalom Results". FIS . Retrieved 10 March 2017.
  6. "Women's Combined Results". FIS . Retrieved 10 March 2017.