FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2007

Last updated

39th FIS Alpine World Ski Championships
Logo Are 2007 Fis Alpine Ski WC.png
Host city Åre, Sweden
Events11
Opening ceremony 2 February 2007
Closing ceremony18 February 2007
Officially opened by Carl XVI Gustaf
  2005
2009  
Sweden relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Åre
Location of Åre in Sweden
Europe relief laea location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Åre
Location of Åre in Europe

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2007 were the 39th FIS Alpine World Ski Championships, held 2–18 February in Åre, Sweden. Åre previously hosted the world championships in 1954, and often hosts late season World Cup events.

Contents

The FIS awarded the 2007 event in 2002; other finalists were Lillehammer, Norway, and Val-d'Isère, France, which was later selected to host the 2009 championships.

These were the first world championships to use the "super-combined" format (one run each of downhill and slalom) for the combined event. First run on the World Cup circuit in 2005 at Wengen, the "super-combi" format (SC) made its debut at the Winter Olympics in 2010. The traditional combined format (K) consists of one downhill run and two slalom runs.

Venues

Course information

A view of Are Lake from the ski area Aresjon Dcastor 2003.jpg
A view of Åre Lake from the ski area
"VM 8:an" hybrid lift, installed in 2006
for the 2007 World Championships Vm8-an Are.JPG
"VM 8:an" hybrid lift, installed in 2006
for the 2007 World Championships


Course information (metric)
RaceStart
elevation
Finish
elevation
Vertical
drop
Course
length
Minimum
gradient
Maximum
gradient
Average
gradient
Downhill – men1240 m396 m844 m2.922 km7%69%33%
Downhill – women10553966592.23614%69%31%
Super-G – men10333966372.12710%69%34%
Super-G – women9713965751.90314%69%32%
Giant slalom – men8123964161.30813%69%35%
Giant slalom – women7963964001.25717%48%36%
Slalom – men6153962190.74019%48%32%
Slalom – women5823961860.6214%48%32%


Course information (imperial)
RaceStart
elevation
Finish
elevation
Vertical
drop
Course
length
Minimum
gradient
Maximum
gradient
Average
gradient
Downhill – men4068 ft1299 ft2769 ft1.816 mi.7%69%33%
Downhill – women3461129921621.38914%69%31%
Super-G – men3389129920901.32210%69%34%
Super-G – women3186129918871.18214%69%32%
Giant slalom – men2664129913650.81313%69%35%
Giant slalom – women2612129913130.78117%48%36%
Slalom – men201812997190.46019%48%32%
Slalom – women190912996100.38814%48%32%

Opening ceremony

2 February 19:00

Men's events

Men's downhill

10 February 12:30. Race postponed to 11 February 10:00 CET due to foggy weather conditions.

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Aksel Lund Svindal Flag of Norway.svg  NOR 1:44.68
Silver medal icon.svg Jan Hudec Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  CAN 1:45.40+0.72
Bronze medal icon.svg Patrik Järbyn Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE 1:45.65+0.97

Men's super-G

Originally planned for 3 February 12:30; postponed to 5 February due to wind conditions.

Race was postponed for a second time, to 6 February 10:00 CET. [1]

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Patrick Staudacher Flag of Italy.svg  ITA 1:14.30
Silver medal icon.svg Fritz Strobl Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 1:14.62+0.32
Bronze medal icon.svg Bruno Kernen Flag of Switzerland.svg   SUI 1:14.92+0.62

Men's giant slalom

Qualification: 12 February 10:00/13:30

Final: 14 February 10:00/13:00

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Aksel Lund Svindal Flag of Norway.svg  NOR 2:19.64
Silver medal icon.svg Daniel Albrecht Flag of Switzerland.svg   SUI 2:20.12+0.48
Bronze medal icon.svg Didier Cuche Flag of Switzerland.svg   SUI 2:20.56+0.92

Men's slalom

Qualification: 15 February 10:00/13:30

Final: 17 February 10:00/13:00

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Mario Matt Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 1:57.33
Silver medal icon.svg Manfred Mölgg Flag of Italy.svg  ITA 1:59.14+1.81
Bronze medal icon.svg Jean-Baptiste Grange Flag of France.svg  FRA 1:59.54+2.21

Men's super combined

8 February 12:30/16:00

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Daniel Albrecht Flag of Switzerland.svg   SUI 2:28.99
Silver medal icon.svg Benjamin Raich Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 2:29.07+0.08
Bronze medal icon.svg Marc Berthod Flag of Switzerland.svg   SUI 2:29.23+0.24

Women's events

Women's downhill

11 February 12:30

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Anja Pärson Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE 1:26.89
Silver medal icon.svg Lindsey C. Kildow Flag of the United States.svg  USA 1:27.29+0.40
Bronze medal icon.svg Nicole Hosp Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 1:27.37+0.48

Women's super-G

Originally planned for 4 February 12:30; postponed to 6 February due to wind conditions. [2]

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Anja Pärson Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE 1:18.85
Silver medal icon.svg Lindsey C. Kildow Flag of the United States.svg  USA 1:19.17+0.32
Bronze medal icon.svg Renate Götschl Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 1:19.38+0.53

Women's giant slalom

13 February 17:00/20:00

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Nicole Hosp Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 2:31.72
Silver medal icon.svg Maria Pietilä-Holmner Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE 2:32.57+ 0.85
Bronze medal icon.svg Denise Karbon Flag of Italy.svg  ITA 2:32.69+ 0.97

Women's slalom

16 February 17:00/20:00

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Šárka Záhrobská Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  CZE 1:43.91
Silver medal icon.svg Marlies Schild Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 1:44.02+0.11
Bronze medal icon.svg Anja Pärson Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE 1:44.07+0.16

Women's super combined

9 February 12:30/16:00

MedalNameNationTimeDiff.
Gold medal icon.svg Anja Pärson Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE 1:57.69
Silver medal icon.svg Julia Mancuso Flag of the United States.svg  USA 1:58.50+0.81
Bronze medal icon.svg Marlies Schild Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 1:58.54+0.85

Team event

Nations team event

18 February 10:00/13:00

This competition was part of the World Championships for the second time. Six athletes from each country, including at least two men and two women, compete in a total of four super-G and four slalom runs. Each country sends one athlete into each run, alternating between men and women. The placings of all eight competitions are added, and the country with the lowest number wins. If an athlete doesn't finish the run, gets disqualified or scores a time worse than 108% of the winning time, an extra penalty is incurred. If an athlete doesn't start, an even greater penalty is incurred.

MedalNameNationSG1SG2SG3SG4SL1SL2SL3SL4Total
Gold medal icon.svg

Renate Götschl
Michaela Kirchgasser
Marlies Schild
Mario Matt
Fritz Strobl
Benjamin Raich

Flag of Austria.svg  AUT 1112441418
Silver medal icon.svg

Anna Ottosson
Anja Pärson
Jens Byggmark
Patrik Järbyn
Markus Larsson
Hans Olsson

Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE 4847122533
Bronze medal icon.svg

Sandra Gini
Rabea Grand
Nadia Styger
Fabienne Suter
Daniel Albrecht
Marc Berthod

Flag of Switzerland.svg   SUI 113212541139

Medal table

PlaceNationGold medal icon.svgSilver medal icon.svgBronze medal icon.svgTotal
1Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 3339
2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 3227
3Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2002
4Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1146
5Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1113
6Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 1001
7Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0303
8Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 0101
9Flag of France.svg  France 0011

Participating nations

60 nations participated: (number of athletes in parentheses)

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References

  1. http://www.are2007.com/parser.php?did=2007:4583%5B%5D
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 4 February 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)