Faro, Portugal

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Faro
Faro Paco Episcopal.jpg
A view of the Algarvian capital, Faro
Pt-far1.png
Flag
FAR.png
Coat of arms
LocalFaro.svg
Coordinates: 37°02′N7°55′W / 37.033°N 7.917°W / 37.033; -7.917 Coordinates: 37°02′N7°55′W / 37.033°N 7.917°W / 37.033; -7.917
CountryFlag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
Region Algarve
Intermunic. comm. Algarve
District Faro
Parishes 4
Government
   President Thomas Delgado (PSD)
Area
  Total202.57 km2 (78.21 sq mi)
Population
 (2011 [1] )
  Total118,000 [1]
Time zone WET/WEST (UTC+0/+1)
Postal code
8000
Local holiday September 7
Website Official website

Faro ( /ˈfɑːr/ FAR-oh, Portuguese:  [ˈfaɾu] ( Loudspeaker.svg listen )) is a municipality and bishopric, the southernmost city and seat of the district of the same name, in the Algarve region of southern Portugal. [2] With a population of 118,000 inhabitants [1] in 2011 (with 64,000 inhabitants in the city proper, making it the biggest city in the Algarve and one of the biggest in Southern Portugal), the municipality covers an area of about 202.57 km2 (78.21 sq mi). [3]

Concelho, is the Portuguese-language term for municipality, referring to the territorial division. In comparison, the word município refers to the organs of State. This differentiation is still in use in Portugal and some of its former overseas provinces, but is no longer in use in Brazil following the abolition of these organs, in favour of the French prefecture system.

Faro District District of Portugal

Faro District is the southernmost district of Portugal, coincident with the Algarve. The administrative centre, or capital, is the city of Faro.

Contents

History

The medieval Cathedral of Faro FaroKesklinn.jpg
The medieval Cathedral of Faro
A view of the historical centre Centro-historico-Faro.jpg
A view of the historical centre

The Ria Formosa lagoon attracted humans from the Palaeolithic age until the end of prehistory. The first settlements date from the fourth century BC, during the period of Phoenician colonization of the western Mediterranean. [4] At the time, the area was known as Ossonoba, and was the most important urban centre of southern Portugal and commercial port for agricultural products, fish, and minerals. [4]

Ria Formosa lagoon in Portugal

The Ria Formosa lagoon, located in the Algarve, in southern Portugal, is a system of barrier islands that communicates with the sea through six inlets. Five of these inlets are natural and have mobility characteristics. The sixth is an artificial inlet that was opened with the purpose of allowing easier access to the port of Faro.

Phoenicia Ancient Semitic civilization

Phoenicia was a thalassocratic, ancient Semitic-speaking Mediterranean civilization that originated in the Levant, specifically Lebanon, in the west of the Fertile Crescent. Scholars generally agree that it was centered on the coastal areas of modern day Lebanon and included parts of what are now northern Israel and southern Syria reaching as far north as Arwad, but there is some dispute as to how far south it went, the furthest suggested area being Ashkelon. Its colonies later reached the Western Mediterranean, such as Carthage in North Africa, and even the Atlantic Ocean, such as Cádiz in Spain. The civilization spread across the Mediterranean between 1500 BC and 300 BC.

Between the second and eighth centuries, the city was under the domain of the Romans, then the Byzantines, and later Visigoths, before being conquered by the Moors in 713. [4] From the third century onwards and during the Visigothic period, it was the site of an Episcopal see, [4] the Ancient Diocese of Ossonoba (306-688). The Byzantine presence has endured in the city walls' towers that were built during the Byzantine period.

Byzantine Empire Roman Empire during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire or Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople. It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453. During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural and military force in Europe. "Byzantine Empire" is a term created after the end of the realm; its citizens continued to refer to their empire simply as the Roman Empire, or Romania (Ῥωμανία), and to themselves as "Romans".

Moors Medieval Muslim inhabitants of the Maghreb, Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and Malta

The term "Moors" refers primarily to the Muslim inhabitants of the Maghreb, the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and Malta during the Middle Ages. The Moors initially were the indigenous Maghrebine Berbers. The name was later also applied to Arabs.

Visigoths Gothic tribe

The Visigoths were the western branches of the nomadic tribes of Germanic peoples referred to collectively as the Goths. These tribes flourished and spread throughout the late Roman Empire in Late Antiquity, or what is known as the Migration Period. The Visigoths emerged from earlier Gothic groups who had invaded the Roman Empire beginning in 376 and had defeated the Romans at the Battle of Adrianople in 378. Relations between the Romans and the Visigoths were variable, alternately warring with one another and making treaties when convenient. The Visigoths invaded Italy under Alaric I and sacked Rome in 410. After the Visigoths sacked Rome, they began settling down, first in southern Gaul and eventually in Hispania, where they founded the Visigothic Kingdom and maintained a presence from the 5th to the 8th centuries AD.

With the advent of Moorish rule in the eighth century, Ossonoba retained its status as the most important town in the southwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula. [4] In the 9th century, it became the capital of a short-lived princedom and was fortified with a ring of defensive walls. [4] At this time, in the 10th century, the name Santa Maria began to be used instead of Ossonoba. By the 11th century, the town was known as Santa Maria Ibn Harun. [4]

Iberian Peninsula Peninsula located in southwest Europe

The Iberian Peninsula, also known as Iberia, is located in the southwest corner of Europe. The peninsula is principally divided between Spain and Portugal, comprising most of their territory. It also includes Andorra, small areas of France, and the British overseas territory of Gibraltar. With an area of approximately 596,740 square kilometres (230,400 sq mi)), it is both the second largest European peninsula by area, after the Scandinavian Peninsula, and by population, after the Balkan Peninsula.

During the Second Crusade soon after the Anglo-Norman forces took Lisbon in 1147 a detachment of this group sack faro on their way to the Holy Land. Again in 1217 during the Fifth Crusade a Frisian fleet of Crusaders on their way to Acre, sacked an burned the city.

During the 500 years of Moorish rule, some Jewish residents of Faro made written copies of the Old Testament. One of Faro's historical names in Arabic is ʼUḫšūnubaḧ. The Moors were defeated and expelled in 1249 by the forces of the Portuguese King Afonso III. With the decline of the importance of the city of Silves (which was made the regional bishopric as Diocese of Silves shortly during and properly after the Reconquista), Faro took over the role of administration of the Algarve area.

Old Testament First part of Christian Bibles based on the Hebrew Bible

The Old Testament is the first part of Christian Bibles, based primarily upon the Hebrew Bible, a collection of ancient religious writings by the Israelites believed by most Christians and religious Jews to be the sacred Word of God. The second part of the Christian Bible is the New Testament.

Arabic Central Semitic language


Arabic is a Semitic language that first emerged in the 1st to 4th centuries CE. It is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living in the area bounded by Mesopotamia in the east and the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in Northwestern Arabia and in the Sinai Peninsula. The ISO assigns language codes to thirty varieties of Arabic, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is modernized Classical Arabic. This distinction exists primarily among Western linguists; Arabic speakers themselves generally do not distinguish between Modern Standard Arabic and Classical Arabic, but rather refer to both as al-ʻArabīyat ul-fuṣḥá.

Afonso III of Portugal King of Portugal

Afonso III, or Affonso, Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician) or Alphonsus (Latin), the Boulonnais, King of Portugal was the first to use the title King of Portugal and the Algarve, from 1249. He was the second son of King Afonso II of Portugal and his wife, Urraca of Castile; he succeeded his brother, King Sancho II of Portugal, who died on 4 January 1248.

Portuguese Kingdom

The civil governor's palace in Faro Faro - Governo Civil.jpg
The civil governor's palace in Faro
The building of the Camara Municipal of Faro Faro City Hall.JPG
The building of the Câmara Municipal of Faro
Estoi Palace Palacio de Estoi, Faro - Algarve. 30.11.2018.jpg
Estoi Palace

After Portuguese independence in 1143, Afonso Henriques and his successors began an expansion into the southern Iberian territory occupied by the Moors. [4] Following the conquest by D. Afonso III, in 1249, the Portuguese referred to the town as Santa Maria de Faaron or Santa Maria de Faaram. [4] In the following years, the town became prosperous, due to its secure port and exploitation of salt. Consequently, by the beginning of the Portuguese Age of Discovery, the town was well positioned to become a leading commercial centre. [4]

Afonso I of Portugal 12th-century King of Portugal

Afonso I, nicknamed the Conqueror, the Founder or the Great by the Portuguese, and El-Bortukali [in Arabic البرتقالي] and Ibn-Arrink or Ibn Arrik [in Arabic ابن الرَّنك or ابن الرَنْق] by the Moors whom he fought, was the first King of Portugal. He achieved the independence of the southern part of the Kingdom of Galicia, the County of Portugal, from Galicia's overlord, the King of León, in 1139, establishing a new kingdom and doubling its area with the Reconquista, an objective that he pursued until his death in 1185, after forty-six years of wars against the Moors.

Salt mineral used as ingredient, composed primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl)

Salt is a mineral composed primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl), a chemical compound belonging to the larger class of salts; salt in its natural form as a crystalline mineral is known as rock salt or halite. Salt is present in vast quantities in seawater, where it is the main mineral constituent. The open ocean has about 35 grams (1.2 oz) of solids per liter of sea water, a salinity of 3.5%.

History of Portugal (1415–1578) first European power to begin a colonial empire

The Kingdom of Portugal in the 15th century was the first European power to begin building a colonial empire. The Portuguese Renaissance was a period of exploration during which Portuguese sailors discovered several Atlantic archipelagos like the Azores, Madeira, and Cape Verde, explored and colonized the African coast, discovered an eastern route to India that rounded the Cape of Good Hope, discovered Brazil, explored the Indian Ocean and established trading routes throughout most of southern Asia, and sent the first direct European maritime trade and diplomatic missions to Ming China and to Japan.

In the 14th century, the Jewish community began to grow in importance. In 1487, Samuel Gacon began printing the Pentateuco in Hebrew, the first book printed in Portugal. [4] The Jewish community of Faro had long been a dominant force in the region, with many artisans and merchants contributing heavily to the economy and city development, [4] but this level of prosperity was interrupted in December 1496 by an edict of Manuel I of Portugal, expelling those who did not convert to Christianity. As a result, officially, Jews no longer remained in Portugal. [4] In the place of the Jewish village of Vila Adentro, the convent of Nossa Senhora da Assunção was founded and patronised by Queen Leonor, wife of the king. [4]

Manuel I promoted the development and expansion of the city; 1499 had the construction of a hospital, the Church of Espírito Santo (or Church of the Misericórdia), a customshouse, and a slaughterhouse, all near the shoreline. [4]

By 1540, John III of Portugal had elevated Faro to the status of city, then in 1577, the bishopric of the Algarve was transferred from Silves, [4] which retains a co-cathedral, to the present Diocese of Faro.

In 1596, the city was sacked by English privateers led by Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex. The resultant fires damaged the walls, churches, and other buildings. [4] At the same time, English troops seized the library of the Bishop of Faro, then Fernando Martins de Mascarenhas, which eventually became part of the collection of the University of Oxford's Bodleian Library. [4] Among the looted books was the first printed book in Portugal: a Torah in local Hebrew (Judeo-Español), printed by Samuel Gacon at his workshop in Faro. [4]

Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, the city was expanded, with a series of walls during the period of the Restoration Wars (1640-1668), encompassing the semicircular front to the Ria Formosa. [4]

The western city of Lagos had become the capital of the historical province of Algarve in 1577, but this all changed with the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. [4] It affected many settlements across the Algarve, including Faro, which suffered damage to churches, convents (specifically the Convent of São Francisco and Convent of Santa Clara), and the episcopal palace, in addition to the walls, castle towers and bulwarks, barracks, guardhouses, warehouses, customshouses, and prison. [4]

Much of the greater devastation across the coastal and lowland regions was caused by a tsunami, which dismantled fortresses and razed homes. Almost all the coastal towns and villages of the Algarve were heavily damaged by the tsunami, except Faro, protected by the sandy banks of the Ria Formosa lagoon. [4] With the capital Lagos devastated, Faro become the administrative seat of the region the following year, 1756. [4]

Geography

The coast of Ria Formosa in Faro, Portugal Faro (Portugal) (14663217040).jpg
The coast of Ria Formosa in Faro, Portugal
Beach near Faro Algarve 2014 (4).JPG
Beach near Faro

The municipality of Faro is divided into two distinct areas, the coastline, part of the Parque Natural da Ria Formosa (Nature Park of Ria Forma) and the barrocal, characterized by hills and valleys, populated with typical Algarvan vegetation. [5]

The nature park was created by Decree-Law 373/87, on 8 December 1987, and is considered one of the seven natural wonders of Portugal, with a beach that is around 7 km (4 mi) from the downtown. [5] It includes the river and a lagoon system, interspersed with dunes, forming a small islands and peninsulas, that protect a large area of marshes, channels, and islets. [5] The beaches in Faro are situated on the peninsula of Ancão and island of Culatra, along the corridor of the nature park. [6] The park is a rich and complex aquatic ecosystem, consisting of barrier islands, marshes, and channels, comprising sandy shorelines that separate the waters of the Ria Formosa and Atlantic Ocean. [6] The beaches of Faro and Barrinha/Barra de São Luís, are located on the Ancão peninsula, the beach of Barreta on the Ilha Deserta, and the beaches of Farol and Culatra are located on the Ilha Culatra. [6] The barrier islands are separated by tidal flats and shallows, including (from west to east) the Barra do Ancão/Barra de São Luís, the Barra de Santa Maria/Barra do Farol, and the Barra da Culatra/Barra da Armona (in the municipality of Olhão). [6]

Annually, many species of aquatic migratory birds transient northern Europe and nest there during the winter. [5] These include flamingos, terns, pied avocets, Eurasion wigeons, and common chaffinches. [5]

Within the town are gardens and open spaces, among which are the Manuel Bivar Garden, Alameda João de Deus Garden, and the Mata do Liceu. [5]

The variety of species and natural conditions result in the region being a popular ecotourism zone, promoting birdwatching, boating trips into the delta, kayaking along the Ria Formosa, pedestrian trails, and biking tours, accompanied by nature guides. [5] The municipality is crossed by the southern Ecovia do Algarve, a bicycling circuit that connects the Algarve to the rest of Europe. [5]

Climate

Faro has a hot-summer mediterranean climate (Köppen: Csa), moderated by the cold Canary current giving a certain resemblance to Southern California that is not heated in the summer by the Mediterranean Sea like Algarve. Being this region more prone to the difference of the precipitation throughout the seasons of the year, in the future scarcity of water could appear in conjunction with the increase of temperature and less incidence of rains. Summers are warm to hot and sunny with average daytime temperatures of 27–35 °C (81–95 °F). The weather in the winter is generally mild with temperatures around . 8-16 °C Faro receives most of its rainfall over the winter; rain is very rare between June and September. The annual average temperature is around 17.5 to 18.5 °C and the annual rainfall is around 500 mm (19.69  in ). The average sea surface temperature is 15–16 °C (59–61 °F) in January rising to 22–25 °C (72–77 °F) in August or September. The higher temperatures reached if the weather patterns produce a significant outflow of warmer surface water out of the Mediterranean which bathe the coastal Algarve with much warmer water. [7] [8] [9]

Climate data for Faro (FAO), elevation: 8 m or 26 ft, 1981-2010 normals, extremes 1981-present
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)21.9
(71.4)
24.7
(76.5)
28.9
(84.0)
30.1
(86.2)
33.6
(92.5)
37.1
(98.8)
44.3
(111.7)
39.6
(103.3)
37.4
(99.3)
33.3
(91.9)
28.6
(83.5)
24.0
(75.2)
44.3
(111.7)
Average high °C (°F)16.1
(61.0)
16.9
(62.4)
19.1
(66.4)
20.4
(68.7)
22.8
(73.0)
26.4
(79.5)
29.2
(84.6)
28.8
(83.8)
26.6
(79.9)
23.2
(73.8)
19.6
(67.3)
17.0
(62.6)
22.2
(72.0)
Daily mean °C (°F)12.0
(53.6)
12.8
(55.0)
14.8
(58.6)
16.1
(61.0)
18.4
(65.1)
21.9
(71.4)
24.2
(75.6)
24.1
(75.4)
22.3
(72.1)
19.3
(66.7)
15.7
(60.3)
13.3
(55.9)
17.9
(64.2)
Average low °C (°F)7.9
(46.2)
8.7
(47.7)
10.5
(50.9)
11.8
(53.2)
14.0
(57.2)
17.3
(63.1)
19.1
(66.4)
19.4
(66.9)
18.0
(64.4)
15.3
(59.5)
11.7
(53.1)
9.6
(49.3)
13.6
(56.5)
Record low °C (°F)−1.2
(29.8)
−1.2
(29.8)
2.3
(36.1)
3.6
(38.5)
6.7
(44.1)
8.0
(46.4)
11.9
(53.4)
13.1
(55.6)
9.9
(49.8)
7.8
(46.0)
2.7
(36.9)
1.2
(34.2)
−1.2
(29.8)
Average precipitation mm (inches)59.3
(2.33)
52.0
(2.05)
39.4
(1.55)
38.6
(1.52)
21.7
(0.85)
4.3
(0.17)
1.8
(0.07)
3.9
(0.15)
23.2
(0.91)
60.1
(2.37)
90.4
(3.56)
114.1
(4.49)
508.8
(20.03)
Source: IPMA [8]

Human geography

Town center of Faro Portugal M Suessen-2266.jpg
Town center of Faro

Administratively, the municipality is divided into four civil parishes ( freguesias ): [11]

International relations

Faro is twinned with: [12]

Other locations named after Faro include Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Faro, Yukon, Canada.

Transport

Part of the International Airport Aeroporto de Faro1.jpg
Part of the International Airport
A Alfa Pendular raillink in the main Faro railway station Alfa Pendular Series 4000 No 4005 (11952353213).jpg
A Alfa Pendular raillink in the main Faro railway station

Faro is served by a transport network connecting it to the Algarve, and by extension, other European markets. Faro is about 3 hours and 30 minutes by air from the principal European destinations, and 2 hours and 30 minutes from Lisbon, along the A2, and less than 1 hour from Andalusia, along the A22. [15]

It receives through the International Airport millions of visitors annually, with 45 airlines serving this airport, including many low-cost airlines. [16] In recent years, the number of visitors travelling through the airport has increased as more and more low-cost airlines compete to offer cheap flights to the Algarve. [16] The transport facilities to and from Faro airport and the centre of Faro include taxicabs and a bus line. [15]

Centrally located, the town is served by Faro railway station, operated by Comboios de Portugal (CP), in addition to a way-station in Bom João. Faro receives trains from intercity lines, Alfa Pendular, and longer regional ones. [17] Despite the proximity of Seville, it is not connected by train. [18]

The town is served by a public transport network that include minibuses, local bus lines, and regional services across the Algarve.

Due to its position along the coast, a need exists to connect the shoreline communities with the outlying with various islands; with the exception of the island of Faro, most are accessible only by boat service. [19] Throughout the year (from the commercial wharf or Portas do Mar wharf, depending the time of year), regular and tourist services are performed along the estuary. [19]

Culture and entertainment

The Faro city holiday is on 7 September. The students' festival (Semana Académica da Universidade do Algarve), organized every year by students from the University of the Algarve, is also an important event in Faro.

Sports

The Estadio Algarve opened for Euro 2004 EstadioAlgarve.JPG
The Estádio Algarve opened for Euro 2004

A 30,000-seat stadium Estádio Algarve, shared by the cities of Faro and Loulé, was one of the venues of the Euro 2004 football championship, and is also the temporary home ground of the Gibraltar national football team. Louletano Desportos Clube (a club from the city of Loulé) and Sporting Clube Farense (from Faro) also use smaller municipal stadiums. The stadium is also used for concerts, festivals, and other events.

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Loulé is a municipality in the Portuguese Algarve, district of Faro. In 2011, the population had 70,622 inhabitants, in an area of approximately 763.67 square kilometres (294.85 sq mi). The municipality have two principal cities: Loulé and Quarteira.

Lagoa, Algarve Municipality in Algarve, Portugal

Lagoa is a town in the former-district of Faro, in the Portuguese region of the Algarve. The population in 2011 was 22,975, in an area of 88.25 km². Its urban population is 6100 inhabitants.

Vila do Bispo Municipality in Algarve, Portugal

Vila do Bispo is a municipality (concelho) in the Portuguese Algarve. The population in 2011 was 5,258, in an area of 179.06 km2.

Almancil Civil parish in Algarve, Portugal

Almancil is a town and freguesia in the Loulé Municipality, in the affluent Golden Triangle region of the Algarve of southern Portugal. Almancil is known for its three Michelin star restaurants, the most of any town in the Algarve.

Church of Our Lady of Light (Lagoa) Church in Algarve, Portugal

The Church of Our Lady of Light is a church situated in civil parish of Lagoa e Carvoeiro, in the municipality of Lagoa, in the Portuguese Algarve region, situated in the urban centre.

Albufeira Municipality in Algarve, Portugal

Albufeira is a city, seat and municipality in the district of Faro, in the southernmost Portuguese region of the Algarve. The municipality population in 2011 was 40,828, in an area of 140.66 square kilometres. The city proper had a population of 13,646 in 2001. It is 250 kilometres (160 mi) from Lisbon, and is within close proximity of Paderne Castle. Lagos is located 30 kilometres (19 mi) to the west, and Faro 45 kilometres (28 mi) to the south-east. A tourist destination, Albufeira expands to approximately 300,000 residents during the summer and during the Christmas and New Year celebrations, owing to the number of hotels and lodgings in the district, that includes marina facilities, golf courses, restaurants and bars for the annual flood of visitors.

References

Notes
  1. 1 2 3 "Faro, Portugal".
  2. Algarve/Southern Portugal (GeoCenter Detail Map). GeoCenter International Ltd. 2003. ISBN   3-8297-6235-6.
  3. "Statistics Portugal". Ine.pt. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Câmara Municipal, ed. (2015), História (in Portuguese), Faro (Algarve), Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Faro
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Câmara Municipal, ed. (2015), Natureza (in Portuguese), Faro, Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Faro
  6. 1 2 3 4 Câmara Municipal, ed. (2015), Praias (in Portuguese), Faro, Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Faro
  7. Berte, Elena; Panagopoulos, Thomas (3 July 2014). "Enhancing city resilience to climate change by means of ecosystem services improvement: a SWOT analysis for the city of Faro, Portugal". International Journal of Urban Sustainable Development. 6 (2): 241–253. doi:10.1080/19463138.2014.953536. ISSN   1946-3138.
  8. 1 2 "IPMA - 008". Meteo.pt. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  9. Ltd, Copyright Global Sea Temperatures-A.-Connect. "Europe sea temperatures | Sea Temperatures". www.seatemperature.org. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  10. "Faro (08554) - WMO Weather Station". NOAA . Retrieved 28 March 2019.
  11. Diário da República. "Law nr. 11-A/2013, page 552 48" (PDF) (in Portuguese). Retrieved 22 July 2014.
  12. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "Consulta". Anmp.pt. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  13. "National Commission for Decentralised cooperation". Délégation pour l’Action Extérieure des Collectivités Territoriales (Ministère des Affaires étrangères) (in French). Archived from the original on 2013-10-08. Retrieved 2013-12-26.
  14. "Portuguese Centennial Park - Hayward, CA - Municipal Parks and Plazas on Waymarking.com". www.waymarking.com.
  15. 1 2 Câmara Municipal, ed. (2015), Como Chegar (in Portuguese), Faro, Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Faro
  16. 1 2 Câmara Municipal, ed. (2015), Aeroporto (in Portuguese), Faro, Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Faro
  17. Câmara Municipal, ed. (2015), Transporte Ferroviário (in Portuguese), Faro, Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Faro
  18. Travel from Seville to Faro, Travelinho.com
  19. 1 2 Câmara Municipal, ed. (2015), Barco para ilhas (in Portuguese), Faro, Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Faro
Sources
Municipality of Faro District (Algarve)

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Albufeira Alcoutim Aljezur Castro Marim Faro Lagoa Lagos Loulé Monchique Olhão Portimão São Brás de Alportel Silves Tavira Vila do Bispo Vila Real de Santo António