Fatimeh Pahlavi

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Princess Fatemeh
Born30 October 1928
Tehran, Iran
Died2 June 1987(1987-06-02) (aged 58)
London, United Kingdom
Spouse
Vincent Lee Hillyer
(m. 1948;div. 1959)

Mohammad Amir Khatami
(m. 1960;his death 1975)
IssuePrince Kayvan Hillyer
Princess Rana Hillyer
Prince Dariush Hillyer
Prince Kambiz Khatami
Prince Ramin Khatami
Princess Pari Khatami
House Pahlavi
Father Reza Shah
Mother Esmat Dowlatshahi

Fatemeh Pahlavi (Persian : فاطمه پهلوی; 30 October 1928 2 June 1987) was Reza Shah Pahlavi's tenth child and half-sister of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. She was a member of the Pahlavi dynasty.

Contents

Early life and education

Fatimeh Pahlavi was born in Tehran on 30 October 1928. [1] [2] She was the tenth child of Reza Shah and his fourth and last wife, Esmat Dowlatshahi. [3] [4] Her mother was from the Qajar dynasty [5] and married Reza Shah in 1923. [6] Fatimeh was the full-sister of Abdul Reza Pahlavi, Mahmoud Reza Pahlavi and Hamid Reza Pahlavi. [7]

She and her brothers lived at Marble palace in Tehran with their parents. [4] She attended Anoushiravan Dadgar Girls' School in Tehran. [8]

Activities

Young Princess Fatimeh, c. 1979

During the reign of her half-brother, Muhammad Reza Pahlavi, Fatimeh Pahlavi owned a bowling club and dealt with business, having shares in the firms involved in construction, vegetable oil production and engineering. [9] She also had a fortune of some $500 million during that time. [10] Her fortune was a result of "commissions" extracted from military contractors by her second husband, Khatami. [10] Pahlavi also involved in activities concerning higher education in Iran. [11]

Personal life

Fatimeh Pahlavi married two times. She married Vincent Lee Hillyer (1924 7 July 1999) in a civil ceremony in Civitavecchia, Italy, on 13 April 1950. [3] Hillyer converted to Islam. [3] [8] On 10 May they wed in a religious ceremony at Iran's embassy in Paris. [3] [12] Hillyer was a friend of her brother Abdul Reza Pahlavi. [13] Fatimeh and Hillyer met in Iran during the latter's visit to the country. [8] The marriage was not fully endorsed by Shah Mohammad Reza, [14] probably due to negative reactions in Iran. [15] They had three children, two sons, Kayvan and Dariush, and one daughter, Rana, who died in an accidental fall in infancy in 1954. [16] [8] They divorced in September 1959. [17] [18]

After divorcing Hillyer, she married Mohammad Amir Khatami, the commanding general of Iran's air force, on 22 November 1959. [19] [18] The shah and his then fiancée Farah Diba attended the wedding ceremony. [18]

They had two sons, Kambiz (born 1961) and Ramin (born 1967), and a daughter, Pari (born 1962). [8] [20] Pahlavi left Iran before the 1979 revolution. [15] During her last years, she was living in London. [21]

During the reign of the Shah, she wore the Sunburst Tiara and was the first and only known person to have worn it. [5]

Death

Pahlavi died at the age of 58 in London on 2 June 1987. [2] [21] She was survived by her four sons. [21]

Honours

National honours

Foreign honours

References

  1. "Iranian princess dies at age 58". The Lewiston Journal. 2 June 1987. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  2. 1 2 "Princess Fatimeh Pahlavi". Associated Press. London. 2 June 1987. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Shah of Iran's half-sister dies". Rome News Tribune. 2 June 1987. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  4. 1 2 Diana Childress (2011). Equal Rights Is Our Minimum Demand: The Women's Rights Movement in Iran 2005. Twenty-First Century Books. p. 40. ISBN   978-0-7613-7273-8 . Retrieved 19 July 2013.
  5. 1 2 "Iranian Royal Jewels: Princess Fatimeh's Sunburst Tiara". Royal Jewels. 8 February 2013. Retrieved 16 July 2013.
  6. Gholam Reza Afkhami (13 December 2008). The Life and Times of the Shah. University of California Press. p. 605. ISBN   978-0-520-94216-5 . Retrieved 19 July 2013.
  7. "Reza Shah Pahlavi". Iran Chamber Society. Retrieved 16 July 2013.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "The Pahlavi Dynasty". Royal Ark. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  9. "105 Iranian firms said controlled by royal family". The Leader Post. Tehran. AP. 22 January 1979. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  10. 1 2 Harris, David (2005). "Buying Loyalty in Iran" (PDF). The Long Term View. 6 (3): 88–96. Retrieved 14 November 2012.
  11. Edgar Burke Inlow (1 January 1979). Shahanshah: The Study of Monarchy of Iran. Motilal Banarsidass Publ. p. 91. ISBN   978-81-208-2292-4 . Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  12. "Iran. Part II (1950–1955)" (PDF). Iranian Hotline. Retrieved 16 July 2013.
  13. Ali Akbar Dareini (1 January 1999). The Rise and Fall of the Pahlavi Dynasty: Memoirs of Former General Hussein Fardust. Motilal Banarsidass Publications. p. 123. ISBN   978-81-208-1642-8 . Retrieved 15 November 2012.
  14. "Half sister of the late Shah". Orlando Sentinel. 3 June 1987. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  15. 1 2 (ed.) Gholamali Haddad Adel, Mohammad Jafar Elmi, Hassan Taromi-Rad (1 October 2012). Pahlavi Dynasty: An Entry from Encyclopaedia of the World of Islam. MIU Press. p. 144. ISBN   978-1-908433-01-5 . Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  16. "Shah of Iran's half-sister dies". Rome News-Tribune. 2 June 1987. Retrieved 25 July 2013.
  17. "US aided in ouster of Shah". St. Joseph News Press. AP. 9 August 1980. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  18. 1 2 3 "Shah engaged". Toledo Blade. 23 November 1960. Retrieved 16 July 2013.
  19. Abbas Milani (2008). Eminent Persians: The Men and Women who Made Modern Iran, 1941-1979: in Two Volumes. Syracuse University Press. p. 457. ISBN   978-0-8156-0907-0 . Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  20. Hadidi, Ebrahim. "Field Martial Mohammad Khatami". Institute for Iranian History. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  21. 1 2 3 "Fatemeh Pahlevi Dies at 58, A Half Sister to Shah of Iran". The New York Times. AP. 3 June 1987. Retrieved 4 November 2012.