Fauna Europaea

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Fauna Europaea is a database of the scientific names and distribution of all living multicellular European land and fresh-water animals. It serves as a standard taxonomic source for animal taxonomy within the Pan-European Species directories Infrastructure (PESI). [1] As of June 2020, Fauna Europaea reported that their database contained 235,708 taxon names and 173,654 species names. [2]

Its construction was initially funded by the European Council (2000–2004). The project was co-ordinated by the University of Amsterdam which launched the first version in 2004, after which the database was transferred to the Natural History Museum Berlin in 2015. [1]

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Britain I. is a distribution area defined in the Fauna Europaea database. It comprises the island of Great Britain and all surrounding islands and island groups including Orkney, Shetland, the Outer and Inner Hebrides, Anglesey and the Isles of Scilly. The Isle of Man is also included in the distribution area.

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References

  1. 1 2 de Jong, Y; Verbeek, M; Michelsen, V; Bjørn Pde, P; Los, W; Steeman, F; Bailly, N; Basire, C; Chylarecki, P; Stloukal, E; Hagedorn, G; Wetzel, FT; Glöckler, F; Kroupa, A; Korb, G; Hoffmann, A; Häuser, C; Kohlbecker, A; Müller, A; Güntsch, A; Stoev, P; Penev, L (2014). "Fauna Europaea – all European animal species on the web". Biodivers Data J. 2 (2): e4034. doi:10.3897/BDJ.2.e4034. PMC   4206781 . PMID   25349527.
  2. "About & Citation". Fauna Europaea. Archived from the original on 12 June 2020. Retrieved 12 June 2020.