Fauquier County, Virginia

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Fauquier County
County
Fauquier County Courthouse.jpg
Fauquier County Courthouse in Warrenton
Fauquier County Seal.png
Map of Virginia highlighting Fauquier County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Virginia in United States.svg
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°44′N77°49′W / 38.74°N 77.81°W / 38.74; -77.81
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Virginia.svg  Virginia
Founded1759
Named for Francis Fauquier
Seat Warrenton
Largest townWarrenton
Area
  Total651 sq mi (1,690 km2)
  Land647 sq mi (1,680 km2)
  Water3.8 sq mi (10 km2)  0.6%
Population
 (2020)
  Total72,972
  Density110/sq mi (43/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district 10th
Website www.fauquiercounty.gov

Fauquier /fɔːˈkɪər/ is a county in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 72,972. [1] The county seat is Warrenton. [2]

Contents

Fauquier County is in Northern Virginia and is a part of the Washington metropolitan area.

History

Portrait of Francis Fauquier, for whom Fauquier County was named Fauquier.jpg
Portrait of Francis Fauquier, for whom Fauquier County was named

In 1608, the first European to explore in the vicinity, Captain John Smith, reported that the Whonkentia (a subgroup of the Siouan-speaking Manahoac tribe) inhabited the area. The Manahoac were forced out around 1670 by the Iroquois (Seneca), who did not resettle the area. [3] The Conoy camped briefly near The Plains, from 1697 to 1699. [4] The Six Nations ceded the entire region including modern Fauquier to Virginia Colony at the Treaty of Albany, in 1722.

Fauquier County was established on May 1, 1759, from Prince William County. It is named for Francis Fauquier, [5] Lieutenant Governor of Virginia at the time, who won the land in a poker game, according to legend.

American Civil War battles in Fauquier County included (in order) the First Battle of Rappahannock Station, the Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, the Battle of Kelly's Ford, the Battle of Aldie, the Battle of Middleburg, the Battle of Upperville, the First and Second Battle of Auburn, the Battle of Buckland Mills, and the Second Battle of Rappahannock Station.

Geography

View west along I-66/SR 55 and north along US 17 in northwestern Fauquier County 2018-10-22 11 22 19 View west along Interstate 66 and Virginia State Route 55 and north along U.S. Route 17 from the overpass for Ashville Road (Virginia State Route 723) in Ashville, Fauquier County, Virginia.jpg
View west along I-66/SR 55 and north along US 17 in northwestern Fauquier County
Harrisonburg to Frederick.svg
Fauquier

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 651 square miles (1,690 km2), of which 647 square miles (1,680 km2) is land and 3.8 square miles (9.8 km2) (0.6%) is water. [6] Fauquier county is not densely populated, but exurban development from Washington, DC has sprung up in some parts. Even in rural areas, housing complexes can be seen along highways. The highest point by elevation is Blue Mountain at 2205 ft (602 meters) on the county's northwestern border with Warren County. [7]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790 17,892
1800 21,32919.2%
1810 22,6896.4%
1820 23,1031.8%
1830 26,08612.9%
1840 21,897−16.1%
1850 20,868−4.7%
1860 21,7064.0%
1870 19,690−9.3%
1880 22,99316.8%
1890 22,590−1.8%
1900 23,3743.5%
1910 22,526−3.6%
1920 21,869−2.9%
1930 21,071−3.6%
1940 21,039−0.2%
1950 21,2481.0%
1960 24,06613.3%
1970 26,3759.6%
1980 35,88936.1%
1990 48,74135.8%
2000 55,13913.1%
2010 65,20318.3%
2020 72,97211.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]
1790–1960 [9] 1900–1990 [10]
1990–2000 [11] 2010 [12] 2020 [13]

2020 census

Fauquier County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / EthnicityPop 2010 [12] Pop 2020 [13] % 2010% 2020
White alone (NH)53,41054,96981.91%75.33%
Black or African American alone (NH)5,2324,9998.02%6.85%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH)1861280.29%0.18%
Asian alone (NH)8261,2041.27%1.65%
Pacific Islander alone (NH)27490.04%0.07%
Some Other Race alone (NH)1033390.16%0.46%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH)1,2413,4911.90%4.78%
Hispanic or Latino (any race)4,1787,7936.41%10.68%
Total65,20372,972100.00%100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 Census

In 2000 there were 19,842 households, out of which 36.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.80% were married couples living together, 8.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.70% were non-families. 18.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.14.

As of 2013, the population was spread out, with 24.2% under the age of 18, 6.40% from 18 to 24, 30.30% from 25 to 44, 26.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.4 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $93,762. [14] The per capita income for the county was $39,600. About 3.70% of families and 5.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.70% of those under age 18 and 8.70% of those age 65 or over.

The county is exurban. There has been increased growth in Warrenton and New Baltimore in recent years. The subdivisions of Brookside and Vint Hill have facilitated the growth in the eastern part of the county. There is some industry in Fauquier County, however the largest employer in the county is the county government and the hospital. As of the 2000 census, 47% of county residents that work have jobs that are outside the county. [15] The average travel time to work is 39.2 minutes.

Government

Board of Supervisors

Constitutional officers

Legislators

The Virginia Senate:

The Virginia House of Delegates:

The U.S. House of Representatives:

Law enforcement

Sheriff's Office headquarters in Warrenton Fauquier County Sheriff's Office 2020.jpg
Sheriff's Office headquarters in Warrenton

The Fauquier County Sheriff's Office is the primary law enforcement agency in Fauquier County, Virginia. Its headquarters are in Warrenton. [18] It supports the Warrenton Training Center, a CIA site in Warrenton.[ citation needed ] Since the office's founding on May 24, 1759, 2 officers have died in the line of duty. [19]

Politics

United States presidential election results for Fauquier County, Virginia [20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 25,10657.50%17,56540.23%9902.27%
2016 22,12759.07%12,97134.63%2,3626.31%
2012 21,03459.16%13,96539.28%5561.56%
2008 19,22756.19%14,61642.71%3761.10%
2004 19,01163.55%10,71235.81%1920.64%
2000 14,45661.56%8,29635.33%7293.10%
1996 11,06357.45%6,75935.10%1,4367.46%
1992 10,49750.57%6,60031.79%3,66217.64%
1988 11,73369.86%4,83728.80%2261.35%
1984 10,31971.41%4,05628.07%760.53%
1980 6,78258.11%4,11935.30%7696.59%
1976 4,71551.75%4,00243.92%3944.32%
1972 4,65467.71%2,03929.67%1802.62%
1968 2,84543.76%2,09932.29%1,55723.95%
1964 2,10137.43%3,50662.46%60.11%
1960 2,12351.86%1,95847.83%130.32%
1956 2,11255.55%1,56741.22%1233.24%
1952 2,06856.27%1,59743.46%100.27%
1948 1,10241.32%1,29148.41%27410.27%
1944 1,08933.99%2,11065.86%50.16%
1940 75628.67%1,87471.07%70.27%
1936 62923.54%2,03776.24%60.22%
1932 37915.82%1,99983.43%180.75%
1928 97238.83%1,53161.17%00.00%
1924 34520.14%1,27774.55%915.31%
1920 56829.26%1,36570.32%80.41%
1916 36723.32%1,20476.49%30.19%
1912 18212.46%1,18781.25%926.30%


Education

Elementary schools

Middle schools

High schools

Private schools

Higher education

Communities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Notable people

See also

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Warrenton, Virginia</span> Town in Virginia, United States

Warrenton is a town in Fauquier County, Virginia, of which it is the seat of government. The population was 9,611 at the 2010 census, up from 6,670 at the 2000 census. The estimated population in 2019 was 10,027. It is at the junction of U.S. Route 15, U.S. Route 17, U.S. Route 29, and U.S. Route 211. The town is in the Piedmont region of Virginia just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The well-known Airlie Conference Center is 3 miles (5 km) north of Warrenton, and the historic Vint Hill Farms military facility is 9 miles (14 km) east. Fauquier Hospital is located in the town. Surrounded by Virginia wine and horse country, Warrenton is a popular destination outside Washington, D.C.

Bealeton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fauquier County, Virginia, United States, at the intersection of U.S. Route 17 and State Route 28. The population was 4,435 at the 2010 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Marshall, Virginia</span> Census-designated place in Virginia, United States

Marshall is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated town in northwestern Fauquier County, Virginia, in the United States. The population as of the 2010 census was 1,480.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Timeline of Fauquier County, Virginia in the Civil War</span>

Timeline of Fauquier County, Virginia in the Civil War

References

  1. "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. Swanton, John R. (1952). The Indian Tribes of North America. Smithsonian Institution. pp. 61–62. hdl: 2027/mdp.39015015025854 . ISBN   0-8063-1730-2. OCLC   52230544.
  4. Harrison Williams, Legends of Loudoun, pp. 20-21.
  5. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp.  124.
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 1, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  7. "Virginia County/Ind. City High Points". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved February 2, 2022.
  8. "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  9. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved January 2, 2014.
  10. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 15, 2013. Retrieved January 2, 2014.
  11. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved January 2, 2014.
  12. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Fauquier County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau .
  13. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Fauquier County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau .
  14. "American FactFinder – Community Facts". factfinder.census.gov. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 11, 2020. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  15. "Get A Life, Lose The Commute". Fauquier Times-Democrat. August 30, 2007. Archived from the original on January 22, 2013.
  16. "Board of Supervisors". Fauquier County. Retrieved October 3, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  17. "Constitutional Officers". Fauquier County. Archived from the original on December 30, 2017. Retrieved December 30, 2017.
  18. "Sheriff's Office | Fauquier County, VA". www.fauquiercounty.gov. Retrieved October 22, 2022.
  19. Officer Down Memorial page
  20. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on March 23, 2018. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  21. "Home | Saint John the Evangelist School". www.sjesva.org. Retrieved December 14, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  22. Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607–1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963.

Coordinates: 38°44′N77°49′W / 38.74°N 77.81°W / 38.74; -77.81