Federal cities of Russia

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A city of federal importance [1] [2] (Russian:город федерального значения, tr. gorod federalnogo znacheniya) or federal city in Russia is a city that has a status of both an inhabited locality and a constituent federal subject. There are three federal cities: Moscow, Saint Petersburg, and Sevastopol. Two of them are the largest cities in the country: Moscow is the national capital and Saint Petersburg is a previous Russian capital and important port on the Baltic Sea. [3] Sevastopol is the newest federal city, located in the disputed region of Crimea, which was annexed by the Russian Federation in 2014 but is recognised as Ukrainian territory by most of the international community. [4]

Map of federal cities of Russia (2014).svg
Map # Code ISO 3166-2 code NameFlagCoat of arms Federal district Economic region Area (km2) [5] Population (2017 est.) [6]
177RU-MOW Moscow Flag of Moscow, Russia.svg Coat of Arms of Moscow.svg Central Central 2,561.512,506,468
278RU-SPE Saint Petersburg Flag of Saint Petersburg Russia.svg Coat of Arms of Saint Petersburg (2003).svg Northwestern Northwestern 1,4395,351,935
392(none) Sevastopol [lower-alpha 1] Flag of Sevastopol.svg COA of Sevastopol.svg Southern North Caucasus 864 [7] 436,670 [7]

Notes

  1. The territory of Crimea, including the city of Sevastopol, is currently disputed. Since February 2014, Crimea has been under de facto Russian control, however Ukraine and most countries recognise Crimea as part of Ukraine.

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Kulinsky District District in Republic of Dagestan, Russia

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References

  1. "Chapter 3. The Federal Structure - The Constitution of the Russian Federation". www.constitution.ru.
  2. "Конституция Российской Федерации".
  3. Gritsai, Olga; van der Wusten, Herman (2000). "Moscow and St. Petersburg, a sequence of capitals, a tale of two cities". GeoJournal. 51 (1/2): 33–45. doi:10.1023/A:1010849220006. JSTOR   41147495. S2CID   154264277.
  4. "Russia completes legal procedure of Crimean annexation". Nationalia. March 21, 2014. Retrieved August 18, 2018.
  5. Федеральная служба государственной статистики (Federal State Statistics Service) (May 21, 2004). "Территория, число районов, населённых пунктов и сельских администраций по субъектам Российской Федерации (Territory, Number of Districts, Inhabited Localities, and Rural Administration by Federal Subjects of the Russian Federation)". Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. Archived from the original on September 28, 2011. Retrieved April 18, 2008.
  6. Федеральная служба государственной статистики (Federal State Statistics Service) (January 1, 2014). "Оценка численности населения на 1 января 2014 года и в среднем за 2013 год (Estimated population of Russia on 1 January 2014 and the average for 2013)". Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  7. 1 2 "A General data of the region". Sevastopol City State Administration. Archived from the original on February 11, 2014. Retrieved April 7, 2014.