Felipe González de Ahedo

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The map of Easter Island (renamed "Isla de San Carlos") from Gonzalez de Ahedo's 1770 expedition. North is down. EasterIsland 1772.JPG
The map of Easter Island (renamed "Isla de San Carlos") from González de Ahedo's 1770 expedition. North is down.

Felipe González de Ahedo, also spelled Phelipe González y Haedo (13 May 1714 in Santoña, Cantabria 26 October 1802), was a Spanish navigator and cartographer known for annexing Easter Island in 1770.

Santoña Municipality in Cantabria, Spain

Santoña is a town in the eastern coast of the autonomous community of Cantabria, on the north coast of Spain. It is situated by the bay of the same name. It is 45 kilometres (28 mi) from the capital Santander. Santoña is divided into two zones, an urban plain, and a mountainous area, with Mount Buciero at its eastern limit, and Brusco and the beach of Berria to the north. The beach of San Martin comprises its south limit and the fishing harbor and marsh area its western limit.

Cantabria Autonomous community and province of Spain

Cantabria is an autonomous community in northern Spain with Santander as its capital city. It is recognized as a historic community and is bordered on the east by the Basque Autonomous Community, on the south by Castile and León, on the west by the Principality of Asturias, and on the north by the Cantabrian Sea.

A navigator is the person on board a ship or aircraft responsible for its navigation. The navigator's primary responsibility is to be aware of ship or aircraft position at all times. Responsibilities include planning the journey, advising the ship's captain or aircraft commander of estimated timing to destinations while en route, and ensuring hazards are avoided. The navigator is in charge of maintaining the aircraft or ship's nautical charts, nautical publications, and navigational equipment, and he/she generally has responsibility for meteorological equipment and communications. With the advent of GPS, the effort required to accurately determine one's position has decreased by orders of magnitude, so the entire field has experienced a revolutionary transition since the 1990s with traditional navigation tasks being used less frequently.

González de Ahedo commanded two Spanish ships, the San Lorenzo and the Santa Rosalia, sent by the Viceroy of Peru, Manuel de Amat y Juniet. They landed on 1770 November 15, only the second time European had seen Easter Island, and stayed five days, thoroughly surveyed the coast, and named it Isla de San Carlos, taking possession on behalf of King Charles III of Spain. They ceremoniously signed a treaty of annexation with the inhabitants and erected three wooden crosses on top of three small hills on Poike volcano. [1]

Charles III of Spain King of Spain and the Spanish Indies from 1759 to 1788

Charles III was King of Spain (1759–1788), after ruling Naples as Charles VII and Sicily as Charles V (1734–1759). He was the fifth son of Philip V of Spain, and the eldest son of Philip's second wife, Elisabeth Farnese. A proponent of enlightened absolutism, he succeeded to the Spanish throne on 10 August 1759, upon the death of his half-brother Ferdinand VI, who left no heirs.

Poike

Poike is one of three main extinct volcanoes that form Rapa Nui. At 370 metres, it is the island's second highest point after Terevaka.

They were amazed by the "standing idols", moai, all of which they could see were erect. [2]

Moai monolithic human figures

Moai, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people on Easter Island in eastern Polynesia between the years 1250 and 1500. Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue. The moai are chiefly the living faces of deified ancestors. The statues still gazed inland across their clan lands when Europeans first visited the island in 1722, but all of them had fallen by the latter part of the 19th century.

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Rongorongo Undeciphered text of Easter Island

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Rapa Nui people native Polynesian inhabitants of Easter Island

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References

  1. Jo Anne Van Tilburg. Easter Island: Archaeology, Ecology and Culture. British Museum Press, London, 1994. ISBN   0-7141-2504-0
  2. Fischer, Steven (2005). Island at the End of the World. London: Reaktion Books Ltd. pp. 60–64. ISBN   9781861892829.