Fifty pounds (British coin)

Last updated

Fifty pounds
United Kingdom
Value£50
Mass31 g
Diameter34.00 mm
EdgeMilled
Composition.999 fine silver
Years of minting2015
Obverse
Design Queen Elizabeth II
Designer Jody Clark
Design date2015
Reverse
Design Britannia
Designer Jody Clark
Design date2015

The fifty pound coin (£50) is a commemorative denomination of sterling coinage. Issued for the first time by the Royal Mint in 2015 and sold at face value, fifty pound coins hold legal tender status but are intended as collectors' items and are not found in general circulation. 100,000 coins will be produced in limited edition presentation. [1]

Contents

Design

The designs which have appeared on the fifty pound coin's reverse are summarised in the table below.

YearEventDesignEdge InscriptionDesigner
2015-Britannia-Jody Clark
2016Death of William Shakespeare (400th Anniversary)--John Bergdahl

See also

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References

  1. "Britannia 2015 UK £50 Fine Silver Coin". Royal Mint . Retrieved 30 November 2015.