Finswimming World Championships

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The Finswimming World Championships is the peak international event for the underwater sport of finswimming. These are conducted on behalf of the sport's governing body, Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques (CMAS) by an affiliated national federation.

Underwater sports is a group of competitive sports using one or a combination of the following underwater diving techniques - breath-hold, snorkelling or scuba including the use of equipment such as diving masks and fins. These sports are conducted in the natural environment at sites such as open water and sheltered or confined water such as lakes and in artificial aquatic environments such as swimming pools. Underwater sports include the following - aquathlon, finswimming, freediving, spearfishing, sport diving, underwater football, underwater hockey, underwater ice hockey, underwater orienteering, underwater photography, underwater rugby, underwater target shooting and underwater video.

Finswimming Competitive watersport using swimfins for propulsion

Finswimming is an underwater sport consisting of four techniques involving swimming with the use of fins either on the water's surface using a snorkel with either monofins or bifins or underwater with monofin either by holding one's breath or using open circuit scuba diving equipment. Events exist over distances similar to swimming competitions for both swimming pool and open water venues. Competition at world and continental level is organised by the Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques (CMAS). The sport's first world championship was held in 1976. It also has been featured at the World Games as a trend sport since 1981 and was demonstrated at the 2015 European Games in June 2015.

Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques International organisation for underwater activities in sport and science, and recreational diver training and certification

Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques (CMAS) is an international federation that represents underwater activities in underwater sport and underwater sciences, and oversees an international system of recreational snorkel and scuba diver training and recognition. It is also known by its English name, the World Underwater Federation, and its Spanish name, Confederacion Mundial De Actividades Subacuaticas. Its foundation in Monaco during January 1959 makes it one of the world's oldest underwater diving organisations.

Contents

Scheduling

The championship is split into two events on the basis of age for both male and female swimmers - seniors (i.e. 18 years and older) and juniors (i.e. 12 to 17 years old). [1] The senior championship was first held in 1976 while the junior championship was first held in 1989. [2] From 1976 to 1990, the senior championships were held every four years, except for the championship held in Moscow during 1982, and from 1990 to 2006 it was held every two years. [2] The junior championship has been held every two years from 1993, with the exception of the years 2005 and 2006. [2] As of 2007, the championships have been held every two years, with the senior age group event being held in the odd years starting with 2007, while the junior age group event is held in even years starting with 2008. [1]

Organisation

A world championship is conducted at two sites within a geographical locality - one being an olympic-size swimming pool (also known as a long course pool) and the other being an open water site suitable for long distance finswimming. [1]

Olympic-size swimming pool olympic swimming pool

An Olympic-size swimming pool conforms to regulated dimensions, large enough for international competition. This type of swimming pool is used in the Olympic Games, where the race course is 50 metres (164.0 ft) in length, typically referred to as "long course", distinguishing it from "short course" which applies to competitions in pools that are 25 metres (82.0 ft) in length. If touch panels are used in competition, then the distance between touch panels should be either 25 or 50 metres to qualify for FINA recognition. This means that Olympic pools are generally oversized, to accommodate touch panels used in competition.

The pool competition is carried out over five days with qualifying heats held in the morning and finals held in the afternoon. Races are conducted in the following techniques and distances for both male and female swimmers:

As of 2014, the long distance competition is held over one day for senior and juniors swimmers with the following schedule: Morning - 4 x 2 km mixed team relay (2 men and 2 women) and Afternoon - 6 km individual swim. National federations may register a maximum of one relay team and a maximum of four individuals for the 6 km race. Long distance swimming is only open to SF and BF techniques. [1] [3]

History

Senior championship

YearDateChampionshipLocation event# Athletes# Events
1976August 30 September 5 1st Finswimming World Championships Flag of Germany.svg Hannover, West Germany [4] 11(m), 10(w)
1980August 5 10 2nd Finswimming World Championships Flag of Italy.svg Bologne, Italy [5] 11(m), 10(w)
1982August 24 29 3rd Finswimming World Championships Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Moscow, USSR [6] 10(m), 10(w)
1986August 3 10 4th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Germany.svg West Berlin, West Germany [7] 11(m), 10(w)
1990August 28 September 2 5th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Italy.svg Rome, Italy 11(m), 11(w)
1992August 17 24 6th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Greece.svg Athens, Greece 11(m), 11(w)
1994October 24 31 7th Finswimming World Championships Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Dongguan, China 12(m), 12(w)
1996August 18 25 8th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Hungary.svg Dunaújváros, Hungary 12(m), 12(w)
1998August 29 September 6 9th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Colombia.svg Cali, Colombia 12(m), 12(w)
2000October 1 09 10th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Spain.svg Palma de Mallorca, Spain 12(m), 12(w)
2002September 7 16 11th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Greece.svg Patras, Greece 12(m), 12(w)
2004October 21 29 12th Finswimming World Championships Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Shanghai, China 12(m), 12(w)
2006July 2 12 13th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Italy.svg Turin, Italy 15(m), 15(w)
2007July 27 August 6 14th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Italy.svg Bari, Italy 18(m), 18(w)
2009August 20 30 15th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Russia.svg St. Petersburg, Russia 21218(m), 18(w)
2011July 28 August 7 16th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Hungary.svg Hódmezővásárhely, Hungary [8] 35018(m), 18(w)
2013August 11 – 21 17th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Russia.svg Kazan, Russia 18(m), 18(w)
2015July 15 – 22 18th Finswimming World Championships [9] Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Yantai China 15(m), 15(w), 1 (mixed)
2016June 23 – 28 19th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Greece.svg Volos, Greece [ citation needed ]15(m), 15(w), 1 (mixed)
2018June 14 – 21 20th Finswimming World Championships Flag of Serbia.svg Belgrade, Serbia 16(m), 16(w), 3 (mixed)
2020July21st Finswimming World Championships Flag of Russia.svg Tomsk, Russia

Junior championship

YearDateChampionshipLocation event# Athletes# Events
1989July 16 181st Finswimming Junior World Championship Flag of Hungary.svg Dunaújváros, Hungary [10]
1993September 2 52nd Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of France.svg Lyon, France [11]
1995July 24 303rd Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Slovakia.svg Bratislava, Slovakia [12]
1997August 18 244th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Hungary.svg Balatonfűzfő, Hungary [13]
1999August 4 85th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of France.svg Strasbourg, France [14]
2001July 23 306th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Mexico.svg Aguascalientes, Mexico [15]
2003August 30 September 77th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Korea (1899).svg Jeju, South Korea [16]
2005August 1 88th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Poland.svg Ostrowiec, Poland [17]
2006July 24 August 29th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Russia.svg Moscow, Russia [18]
2008July 2 1210th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Colombia.svg Neiva, Colombia [19]
2010July 5 1211th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Spain.svg Palma de Mallorca, Spain [20] 20023 nations
2012July 16 2212th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Austria.svg Graz, Austria [21]
2014June 25 July 113th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Greece.svg Chania, Greece [22] 19824 nations
2016July 4 – 1114th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of France.svg Annemasse, France
2017July 31 – August 715th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Russia.svg Tomsk, Russia
2019July 28 – August 416th Finswimming Junior World Championships Flag of Egypt.svg Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt

Related Research Articles

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References

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