Fluid Dynamics Prize (APS)

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The Fluid Dynamics Prize is a prize that has been awarded annually by the American Physical Society (APS) since 1979. The recipient is chosen for "outstanding achievement in fluid dynamics research". The prize is currently valued at US$10,000. In 2004, the Otto Laporte Award—another APS award on fluid dynamics—was merged into the Fluid Dynamics Prize. [1]

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Recipients

The Fluid Dynamics Prize has been awarded to: [2]


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References

  1. "Fluid Dynamics Prize". American Institute of Physics. 11 November 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  2. "Fluid Dynamics Prize". American Physical Society . Retrieved 14 October 2018.
  3. "2020 APS Fall Prize & Award Recipients". www.aps.org. Retrieved 2020-07-24.