Flynn Robinson

Last updated

Flynn Robinson
Flynn Robinson.jpg
Robinson with the Bucks
Personal information
Born(1941-04-28)April 28, 1941
Murphysboro, Illinois
DiedMay 23, 2013(2013-05-23) (aged 72)
Los Angeles, California
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Listed weight185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High school Elgin (Elgin, Illinois)
College
NBA draft 1965 / Round: 2 / Pick: 15th overall
Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
Playing career1965–1978
Position Point guard
Number20, 5, 21, 30, 40
Career history
19661967 Cincinnati Royals
19671968 Chicago Bulls
19681970 Milwaukee Bucks
1970–1971 Cincinnati Royals
19711972 Los Angeles Lakers
1972–1973 Baltimore Bullets
1973–1974 San Diego Conquistadors
1978 Indiana Wizards
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA and ABA statistics
Points 7,577 (14.0 ppg)
Rebounds 1,372 (2.5 rpg)
Assists 1,628 (3.0 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Flynn James Robinson (April 28, 1941 – May 23, 2013) was an American professional basketball player. [1]

Contents

Biography

Flynn was born April 28, 1941 from the union of Sam Hopkins and Dorothy Mae Robinson. Later Flynn's mother married Johnnie Hodge, Sr., Flynn's step-father. A native of Murphysboro, Illinois, Robinson later moved to Kinloch, Missouri (St. Louis area) where he attended Dunbar Elementary School thru the 4th Grade as Flynn Hodge. Afterwards Flynn lived in Elgin, Illinois (Chicago area) and graduated in 1959 from Elgin High School.

Robinson attended Southern Illinois University in September 1959 for one semester and was on the Basketball Team. Later he transferred to and attended Casper College in Casper, Wyoming before transferring to the University of Wyoming in Laramie, Wyoming. A 6'1" guard at Wyoming, Robinson was a three-time first-team All-Western Athletic Conference honoree. He averaged 26.2 points per game as a sophomore, 25.6 points as a junior and 27 points as a senior and was the 6th leading scorer in the Nation. His 2,049 points place him third on Wyoming's all-time scoring list, and in 2005 he was named to the school's All-Century team.

Robinson played seven seasons (19661973) in the National Basketball Association and one season (19731974) in the later merged American Basketball Association. He averaged 14.5 points per game and 3.1 assists per game during his NBA/ABA career.

The 15th pick in the 1965 NBA draft, Robinson made his NBA debut with the Cincinnati Royals in 1966.

Later Robinson played for the Chicago Bulls and Milwaukee Bucks. The Bucks' Broadcaster, Eddie Doucette, called him the "Electric Eye".

In the 1969–70 season with Milwaukee, Robinson averaged a career high 21.8 points per game and was selected to the 1970 NBA All-Star Game, the only All-Star game he would play in. He also led the NBA in free throw percentage that season. [2]

Traded to Los Angeles in 1971 from the Cincinnati Royals, Robinson was a Reserve Guard behind Jerry West and Gail Goodrich for the Los Angeles Lakers team that won a league-record 33 consecutive games and later won an NBA championship with the team in 1972, playing on what has been considered one of the NBA's Top Ten Teams of all time. When he joined the Lakers, their Broadcaster, Chick Hearn, called him "Instant Points".

In 1992, Robinson returned to Los Angeles where he and his Laker Teammates, including Legends Wilt Chamberlain, Elgin Baylor, and Jerry West, were Honored at the 20th Year Celebration of the 1972 NBA Champion Los Angeles Lakers. Later in January 2005, Robinson was named to Wyoming's All-Century Team. [3] In 2012, while living in the Los Angeles area, Robinson again was Honored with his surviving Teammates at the 40th Year Celebration of the 1972 NBA Champion Lakers who continue to hold the Historic 33-Games Win Streak, a long-standing Pro Sports Record. The Lakers presented Flynn and each surviving Team member with a huge expensive Diamonds Cluster Ring.

Death

Robinson died on May 23, 2013 in Los Angeles of multiple myeloma. He was 72 and is survived by his wife, Nancy Pitts-Robinson, four brothers and two sisters. [2]

NBA/ABA career statistics

Legend
  GPGames played  GS Games started MPG Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage 3P%  3-point field goal percentage FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game APG  Assists per game SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game PPG Points per game Bold Career high
  Won an NBA championship  * Led the league

Regular season

YearTeamGPMPGFG%3P%FT%RPGAPGSTLBLKPPG
1966–67 Cincinnati 7615.0.457.7791.81.48.8
1967–68 Cincinnati 28.0.300.4292.02.54.5
1967–68 Chicago 7327.8.441.8283.72.916.0
1968–69 Chicago 1830.6.423.8333.83.219.1
1968–69 Milwaukee 6531.8.436.8413.64.920.3
1969–70 Milwaukee 8134.1.477.898*3.25.521.8
1970–71 Cincinnati 7119.3.458.8552.01.913.3
1971–72 L.A. Lakers 6415.7.490.8601.82.29.9
1972–73 L.A. Lakers 67.8.500.7501.21.35.7
1972–73 Baltimore 3815.3.458.8391.42.06.9
1973–74 San Diego(ABA) 4915.9.457.267.7651.62.3.5.08.8
Career54322.7.456.267.8462.53.0.5.014.0
All-Star18.0.7501.02.06.0

Playoffs

YearTeamGPMPGFG%FT%RPGAPGPPG
1967 Cincinnati 418.0.511.5001.82.012.5
1968 Cincinnati 536.0.429.7082.02.620.2
1970 Milwaukee 1030.0.326.8802.35.012.8
1972 L.A. Lakers 710.3.463.7001.9.76.4
1973 Baltimore 12.0.6671.0.04.0
Career2723.2.406.7952.02.812.1

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References

  1. Pincus, Eric (May 23, 2013), "Lakers mourn the death of Flynn Robinson", The Los Angeles Times
  2. 1 2 Goldstein, Richard (May 25, 2013), "Flynn Robinson, Scorer on Dominant N.B.A. Club, Dies at 72", The New York Times
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on February 20, 2007. Retrieved July 10, 2006.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)