Folkstsaytung

Last updated
Folkstsaytung
Typedaily newspaper
Founded1921
Political alignment General Jewish Labour Bund
Language Yiddish
Ceased publication1939
CountryPoland

The Folkstsaytung ("People's Paper") was a Yiddish language daily newspaper which served as the official organ of the General Jewish Labour Bund in Poland. Folkstsaytung was published in Warsaw, Second Polish Republic. [1] It began publication in 1921 and officially lasted until the Nazi invasion of Poland in 1939. Thereafter it continued on as an illegal underground newspaper until 1943. Its chief editors were Victor Alter and Henrik Erlich. In 1927 it was renamed Naye Folkstsaytung ("New People's Paper"). [2] It began to be published again after World War II but in 1948 it was taken over by Communist authorities and disbanded. [3]

The newspaper reflected the Jewish secular socialist ideology of the Bund and spoke up for rights of workers, reported on Polish politics and Sejm debates, included articles on cultural and scientific topics, as well as literary works of both Jewish and non-Jewish authors. [2] The newspaper had a women's page Froyen-Vinkl, which was edited by Dina Blond. [4]

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References

  1. Labour and Socialist International. The Socialist Press - The press of the parties affiliated to the Labour and Socialist International. Series 4 - No. 2. Brussels, August 1939. p. 56
  2. 1 2 Yivo Institute for Jewish Research, "Here and Now: The Vision of the Jewish Labor Bund in Interwar Poland", "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-02-12. Retrieved 2014-02-07.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. Hershel Edelheit, "History of the Holocaust: a handbook and dictionary", Westview Press, 1994, pg. 377,
  4. "Dina Blond".