Folsom Peak

Last updated
Folsom Peak
USA Wyoming location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Folsom Peak
Yellowstone National Park, Park County, Wyoming
Highest point
Elevation 9,334 ft (2,845 m) [1]
Coordinates 44°52′22″N110°32′51″W / 44.87278°N 110.54750°W / 44.87278; -110.54750 (Folsom Peak) Coordinates: 44°52′22″N110°32′51″W / 44.87278°N 110.54750°W / 44.87278; -110.54750 (Folsom Peak) [1]
Geography
Location Yellowstone National Park, Park County, Wyoming
Parent range Washburn Range
Topo map Cook Peak

Folsom Peak el. 9,334 feet (2,845 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range of Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named in 1895 by geologist Arnold Hague to honor David E. Folsom, [2] a member of the Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition of 1869. Folsom, Peterson and Cook were some of the 1st explorers of the Yellowstone region to publish their exploration. [3]

Yellowstone National Park first national park in the world, located in the US states Wyoming, Montana and Idaho

Yellowstone National Park is an American national park located in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. It was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on March 1, 1872. Yellowstone was the first national park in the U.S. and is also widely held to be the first national park in the world. The park is known for its wildlife and its many geothermal features, especially Old Faithful geyser, one of its most popular features. It has many types of ecosystems, but the subalpine forest is the most abundant. It is part of the South Central Rockies forests ecoregion.

Arnold Hague American geologist

Arnold Hague was a United States geologist who did many geological surveys in the U.S., of which the best known was that for Yellowstone National Park. He also had assignments in China and Guatemala. He became a member of the U. S. Geological Survey in 1879 when it was first organized.

Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition research expedition

The Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition of 1869 was the first organized expedition to explore the region that became Yellowstone National Park. The privately financed expedition was carried out by David E. Folsom, Charles W. Cook and William Peterson of Diamond City, Montana, a gold camp in the Confederate Gulch area of the Big Belt Mountains east of Helena, Montana. The journals kept by Cook and Folsom, as well as their personal accounts to friends were of significant inspirational value to spur the organization of the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition which visited Yellowstone in 1870.

Folsom Peak's namesake, David E. Folsom D.E.Folsum.jpg
Folsom Peak's namesake, David E. Folsom

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Folsom Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey.
  2. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 128.
  3. Whittlesey, Lee (1996). Yellowstone Place Names. Gardiner, MT: Wonderland Publishing Company. p. 108. ISBN   1-59971-716-6.

Related Research Articles

Absaroka Range mountain range

The Absaroka Range is a sub-range of the Rocky Mountains in the United States. The range stretches about 150 mi (240 km) across the Montana-Wyoming border, and 75 miles at its widest, forming the eastern boundary of Yellowstone National Park along Paradise Valley (Montana), and the western side of the Bighorn Basin. The range borders the Beartooth Mountains to the north and the Wind River Range to the south. The northern edge of the range rests along I-90 and Livingston, Montana. The highest peak in the range is Francs Peak, located in Wyoming at 13,153 ft (4,009 m). There are 46 other peaks over 12,000 ft (3,700 m).

Lamar River river in the United States of America

The Lamar River is a tributary of the Yellowstone River, approximately 40 miles (48 km) long, in northwestern Wyoming in the United States. The river is located entirely within Yellowstone National Park.

Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition research expedition

The Washburn Expedition of 1870 explored the region of northwestern Wyoming that two years later became Yellowstone National Park. Led by Henry Washburn and Nathaniel P. Langford, and with a U.S. Army escort headed by Lt. Gustavus C. Doane, the expedition followed the general course of the Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition made the previous year.

Trails of Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park has over 1,100 miles (1,800 km) of blazed and mapped hiking trails, including some that have been in use for hundreds of years. Several of these trails were the sites of historical events. Yellowstone's trails are noted for various geysers, hot springs, and other geothermal features, and for viewing of bald eagles, ospreys, grizzly bears, black bears, wolves, coyotes, bighorn sheep, pronghorns, and free-ranging herds of bison and elk.

Eagle Peak (Wyoming) mountain

Eagle Peak is a mountain in the Absaroka Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming and at 11,372 feet (3,466 m) is the highest point in Yellowstone National Park. It is located about 6 miles (9.7 km) east of the southeast arm of Yellowstone Lake.

Gardner River river in the United States of America

The Gardner River is a tributary of the Yellowstone River, approximately 25 miles (40 km) long, in northwestern Wyoming and south central Montana in the United States. The entire river is located within Yellowstone National Park. It rises on the slope of Joseph Peak, Gallatin Range in the northwestern part of the park, and winds southeast through Gardner's Hole, a broad subalpine basin which is a popular trout fishing location. Angling on the Gardner is governed by Yellowstone National Park fishing regulations. After merging with Panther Creek, Indian Creek and Obsidian Creek, it then turns north and flows through a steep canyon where it cuts through a basaltic flow from approximately 500,000 years ago known as Sheepeater Cliffs. Below Sheepeater, Glen Creek out of Golden Gate Canyon and Lava Creek out of Lava Creek Canyon join the Gardner near Mammoth Hot Springs. The river crosses the 45th parallel in Gardner Canyon and is also home to a popular hot spring known as The Boiling River. The river continues north through Gardner Canyon and empties into the Yellowstone near Gardiner, Montana.

Outline of Yellowstone National Park Wikimedia list article

The following articles relate to the history, geography, geology, flora, fauna, structures and recreation in Yellowstone National Park.

Shoshone Lake Lake in Teton County, Wyoming, USA

Shoshone Lake is a U.S. backcountry lake with the area of 8,050 acres elevated at 7,795 feet (2,376 m) in the southwest section of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. It lies at the headwaters of the Lewis River a tributary of the Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service believes that Shoshone Lake is the largest backcountry lake in the lower 48 states that cannot be reached by a road.

Mount Hornaday mountain in United States of America

Mount Hornaday el. 10,003 feet (3,049 m) is a mountain peak in the northeast section of Yellowstone National Park in the Absaroka Range, Wyoming. The peak was named in 1938 for naturalist William Temple Hornaday, a former director of the New York Zoological Gardens who championed the cause of saving the American Bison from extinction.

Abiathar Peak mountain in United States of America

Abiathar Peak el. 10,928 feet (3,331 m) is a mountain peak in the northeastern section of Yellowstone National Park of Absaroka Range. The peak was named by members of the 1885 Hague Geological Survey to honor Charles Abiathar White, a geologist and paleontologist who had participated in early western geological surveys. White never visited Yellowstone.

Factory Hill mountain in United States of America

Factory Hill el. 9,527 feet (2,904 m) is a mountain peak in the Red Mountains of Yellowstone National Park. It is directly north of Mount Sheridan and west of the Heart Lake Geyser Basin. Early in the history of Yellowstone, this peak was call Red Mountain by the Hayden surveys, a name later transferred to the range in which it resides. In 1885, the Hague Geological Survey gave the peak its present name based on the following passage by Nathaniel P. Langford in his 1871 Scribner's account of the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition. Langford's party was camped near the south arm of Yellowstone Lake at the time.

Mount Norris mountain in United States of America

Mount Norris el. 9,842 feet (3,000 m) is a mountain peak in the northeast section of Yellowstone National Park in the Absaroka Range. In 1875, the peak was named for and named by Philetus Norris, the second park superintendent (1877–1882). Norris was on a visit to the park with several mountain guides, including Collins Jack Yellowstone Jack Baronette. They ascended the peak at the head of the Lamar Valley and presumed they were the first white men to do so, thus naming it Mount Norris.

Cook Peak mountain in Wyoming, USA

Cook Peak el. 9,754 feet (2,973 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range of Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named in 1922 by then superintendent Horace Albright to honor of Charles W. Cook, a member of the 1869 Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition which explored the Yellowstone park region. 1922 was the 50th anniversary of the park's creation, and Charles Cook, still living in Montana, attended ceremonies in the park. Prior to 1922, the peak had been named Thompson Peak by Philetus Norris in 1880 and Storm Peak by members of the Arnold Hague Geological Surveys in 1885.

Hedges Peak mountain in United States of America

Hedges Peak el. 9,669 feet (2,947 m) is a mountain peak in the Washburn Range in Yellowstone National Park. The peak was named in 1895 by geologist Arnold Hague to honor Cornelius Hedges (1837–1907), a member of the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition of 1871 and prominent Montana lawyer. Hedges accounts of the expedition in Helena Daily Herald newspaper contributed to the campaign to create Yellowstone National Park. Prior to 1895 the peak had been named Surprise Peak by geologist J.P. Iddings in 1883.

Terrace Mountain mountain in Wyoming, United States of America

Terrace Mountain is a mountain peak in the Gallatin Range in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, United States. The mountain is located 2.2 miles (3.5 km) southwest of Mammoth Hot Springs. Terrace Mountain was named by the 1878 Hayden Geological Survey because of its proximity to the travertine terraces at Mammoth and because it too is an ancient travertine terrace. The mountain has also been known as "Soda Mountain" and "White Mountain".

Mount Hancock (Wyoming) mountain in United States of America

Mount Hancock el. 10,223 feet (3,116 m) is an isolated mountain peak on Big Game Ridge in Yellowstone National Park. Captain John W. Barlow named the peak in honor of General Winfield Scott Hancock during the Barlow-Heap Exploration of Yellowstone in 1871. General Hancock is noted for issuing the orders that established the military escort led by Lt. Gustavus Cheyney Doane for the Washburn–Langford–Doane Expedition of 1870.

Joseph Peak mountain in United States of America

Joseph Peak el. 10,420 feet (3,180 m) is a mountain peak in the southern section of the Gallatin Range in Yellowstone National Park. It was named for Chief Joseph.

Echo Peak (Wyoming) mountain in Wyoming, USA

Echo Peak el. 9,570 feet (2,920 m) is a mountain peak in the southern section of the Gallatin Range in Yellowstone National Park.

Overhanging Cliff

Overhanging Cliff is a cliff of vertical basalt that overhangs the Grand Loop Road just north of Tower Fall on the north rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone in Yellowstone National Park. The point was most likely named by a member of the Cook–Folsom–Peterson Expedition, David Folsum in 1869.