Football at the 1996 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament

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Football at the 1996 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament
Tournament details
Host countryUnited States
DatesJuly 21 – August 1
Teams8 (from 4 confederations)
Venue(s)5 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of the United States.svg  United States [1] (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Third placeFlag of Norway.svg  Norway
Fourth placeFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored53 (3.31 per match)
Attendance691,762 (43,235 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes
Flag of Norway.svg Linda Medalen
Flag of Brazil.svg Pretinha (4 goals)
2000

The 1996 Summer Olympics—based in Atlanta, Georgia, United States—marked the first time that women participated in the Olympic association football tournament. [2] [3] The tournament featured eight women's national teams from four continental confederations. The teams were drawn into two groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament (which was held in Miami, Orlando, Birmingham and Washington, D.C.). At the end of the group stage, the top two teams advanced to the knockout stage (which was held at Sanford Stadium in Athens, Georgia), beginning with the semi-finals and culminating with the gold medal match on August 1, 1996.

1996 Summer Olympics Games of the XXVI Olympiad, in Atlanta

The 1996 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad, commonly known as Atlanta 1996, and also referred to as the Centennial Olympic Games, were an international multi-sport event that was held from July 19 to August 4, 1996, in Atlanta, USA. These Games, which were the fourth Summer Olympics to be hosted by the United States, marked the centenary of the 1896 Summer Olympics in Athens—the inaugural edition of the modern Olympic Games. They were also the first since 1924 to be held in a different year from a Winter Olympics, under a new IOC practice implemented in 1994 to hold the Summer and Winter Games in alternating, even-numbered years.

Atlanta Capital of Georgia, United States

Atlanta is the capital and most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia. With an estimated 2018 population of 498,044, it is also the 37th most-populous city in the United States. The city serves as the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, home to 5.9 million people and the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the nation. Atlanta is the seat of Fulton County, the most populous county in Georgia. Portions of the city extend eastward into neighboring DeKalb County.

Georgia (U.S. state) State of the United States of America

Georgia is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Georgia is the 24th largest and 8th-most populous of the 50 United States. Georgia is bordered to the north by Tennessee and North Carolina, to the northeast by South Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by Florida, and to the west by Alabama. The state's nicknames include the Peach State and the Empire State of the South. Atlanta, a "beta(+)" global city, is both the state's capital and largest city. The Atlanta metropolitan area, with an estimated population of 5,949,951 in 2018, is the 9th most populous metropolitan area in the United States and contains about 60% of the entire state population.

Contents

Competition schedule

GGroup stage½SemifinalsB3rd place play-offFFinal
Sun 21Mon 22Tue 23Wed 24Thu 25Fri 26Sat 27Sun 28Mon 29Tue 30Wed 31Thu 1
GGG½BF

Qualification

The following eight teams qualified for the 1996 Olympics football tournament:

Venues

The tournament was held in five venues across five cities:

Sanford Stadium American football stadium at the University of Georgia

Sanford Stadium is the on-campus playing venue for football at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia, United States. The 92,746-seat stadium is the tenth-largest stadium in the NCAA. Architecturally, the stadium is known for its numerous expansions over the years that have been carefully planned to fit with the existing "look" of the stadium. The view of Georgia's campus and rolling hills from the open west end-zone has led many to refer to Sanford Stadium as college football's "most beautiful on-campus stadium", while the surrounding pageantry has made it noteworthy as one of college football's "best, loudest, and most intimidating atmospheres". Games played there are said to be played "Between the Hedges" due to the field being surrounded by privet hedges, which have been a part of the design of the stadium since it opened in 1929. The current hedges were planted in 1996 after the originals were taken out to accommodate soccer for the 1996 Summer Olympics.

Athens, Georgia Consolidated city–county in Georgia, United States

Athens, officially Athens–Clarke County, is a consolidated city–county and college town in the U.S. state of Georgia. Athens lies about 70 mi (113 km) northeast of downtown Atlanta, a global city. The University of Georgia, the state's flagship public university and an R1 research institution, is in Athens and contributed to its initial growth. In 1991, after a vote the preceding year, the original City of Athens abandoned its charter to form a unified government with Clarke County, referred to jointly as Athens–Clarke County. As of 2017, the U.S. Census Bureau's estimated population of the consolidated city-county was 125,691; the entire county including Winterville and Bogart had a population of 127,064. Athens is the sixth-largest city in Georgia, and the principal city of the Athens metropolitan area, which had a 2017 estimated population of 209,271, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Metropolitan Athens is a component of the larger Atlanta–Athens–Clarke County–Sandy Springs Combined Statistical Area, a trading area.The city is dominated by a pervasive student culture and music scene centered on downtown Athens, next to the University of Georgia's North Campus. Major music acts associated with Athens include numerous alternative rock bands such as R.E.M., the B-52's, Widespread Panic, and Neutral Milk Hotel. The city is also known as a recording site for such groups as the Atlanta-based Indigo Girls.

Legion Field Stadium in Birmingham, Alabama, United States

Legion Field is an outdoor stadium in the southeastern United States in Birmingham, Alabama, primarily designed to be used as a venue for American football, but occasionally used for other large outdoor events. Opened 92 years ago in 1927, it is named in honor of the American Legion, a U.S. organization of military veterans.

Squads

Match officials

Preliminary round

Group E

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 321071+67 Semi-finals
2Flag of the United States.svg  United States (H)321051+47
3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 31024513
4Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 300321190
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host.
United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–0Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Venturini Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Hamm Soccerball shade.svg 41'
Milbrett Soccerball shade.svg 49'
Report (FIFA)
Citrus Bowl, Orlando
Attendance: 25,303 [4]
Referee: Cláudia de Vasconcellos (Brazil)
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg0–2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Report (FIFA) Shi Guihong Soccerball shade.svg 31'
Zhao Lihong Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Orange Bowl, Miami
Attendance: 46,724 [5]
Referee: Gamal Al-Ghandour (Egypt)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg2–1Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Venturini Soccerball shade.svg 15'
MacMillan Soccerball shade.svg 62'
Report (FIFA) Overbeck Soccerball shade.svg 64' (o.g.)
Citrus Bowl, Orlando
Attendance: 28,000 [6]
Referee: Bente Ovedie Skogvang (Norway)
Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg1–5Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Madsen Soccerball shade.svg 55' Report (FIFA) Shi Guihong Soccerball shade.svg 10'
Liu Ailing Soccerball shade.svg 49'
Sun Qingmei Soccerball shade.svg 29', 59'
Fan Yunjie Soccerball shade.svg 36'
Orange Bowl, Miami
Attendance: 34,871 [7]
Referee: Benito Archundia (Mexico)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg0–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
Report (FIFA)
Orange Bowl, Miami
Attendance: 55,650 [8]
Referee: Pierluigi Collina (Italy)
Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg1–3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Jensen Soccerball shade.svg 90' Report (FIFA) Swedberg Soccerball shade.svg 62', 68'
Videkull Soccerball shade.svg 76'
Citrus Bowl, Orlando
Attendance: 17,020 [9]
Referee: Cláudia de Vasconcellos (Brazil)

Group F

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 321094+57 Semi-finals
2Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 312053+25
3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 31116604
4Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 30032970
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg3–2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 5'
Tomei Soccerball shade.svg 29' (o.g.)
Mohr Soccerball shade.svg 52'
Report (FIFA) Kioka Soccerball shade.svg 18'
Noda Soccerball shade.svg 33'
Legion Field, Birmingham
Attendance: 44,211 [10]
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg2–2Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Report (FIFA) Pretinha Soccerball shade.svg 57', 89'

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg2–0Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Kátia Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Pretinha Soccerball shade.svg 78'
Report (FIFA)
Legion Field, Birmingham
Attendance: 26,111 [12]
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg3–2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 5'
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 34'
Riise Soccerball shade.svg 65'
Report (FIFA) Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Prinz Soccerball shade.svg 62'

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg1–1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Sissi Soccerball shade.svg 53' Report (FIFA) Wunderlich Soccerball shade.svg 4'
Legion Field, Birmingham
Attendance: 28,319 [14]
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg4–0Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Pettersen Soccerball shade.svg 25', 86'
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 60'
Tangeraas Soccerball shade.svg 74'
Report (FIFA)

Knockout stage

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
July 28 – Athens, Georgia
 
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 3
 
August 1 – Athens
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 1
 
July 28 – Athens, Georgia
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1
 
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States (AET )2
 
Third place
 
 
August 1 – Athens
 
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0
 
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2

Semi finals

China  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg3–2Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Qingmei Soccerball shade.svg 5'
Haiying Soccerball shade.svg 83', 90'
Report Roseli Soccerball shade.svg 67'
Pretinha Soccerball shade.svg 72'
Sanford Stadium, Athens, Georgia
Attendance: 64,196
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg1–2 (a.e.t)Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 18' Report Akers Soccerball shade.svg 76' (pen)
MacMillan Soccerball shade gold.svg 100'
Sanford Stadium, Athens, Georgia
Attendance: 64,196
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Bronze medal match

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg0–2Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Report Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 21', 25'
Sanford Stadium, Athens, Georgia
Attendance: 76,489
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)

Gold medal match

China  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg1–2Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Wen Soccerball shade.svg 32' Report MacMillan Soccerball shade.svg 19'
Milbrett Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Sanford Stadium, Athens, Georgia
Attendance: 76,489
Referee: Bente Ovedie Skogvang (Norway)

FIFA Fair play award

Goalscorers

With four goals, Pretinha of Brazil, Ann Kristin Aarønes and Linda Medalen of Norway are the top scorers in the tournament. In total, 53 goals were scored by 33 different players, with two of them credited as own goals.

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

Own goals

Final ranking

RankTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)541093+613
2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China  (CHN)5311115+610
3Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)5311126+610
4Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil  (BRA)512278–15
5Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)31116604
6Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)310245–13
7Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan  (JPN)300329–70
8Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark  (DEN)3003211–90

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