Fortune Street

Last updated

Fortune Street
FortuneStreet.jpg
North American Wii series release
Genre(s) Board game
Developer(s) Square Enix
Publisher(s) Square Enix
Nintendo
Creator(s) Yuji Horii
Platform(s) Family Computer, Super Famicom, PlayStation, PlayStation 2, PlayStation Portable, Nintendo DS, Wii, iOS, Android, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita
First release Itadaki Street: Watashi no Omise ni Yottette
March 21, 1991
Latest release Itadaki Street: Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy 30th Anniversary
October 19, 2017

Fortune Street(いただきストリート,Itadaki Sutorīto, lit. Top Street) (also known as Boom Street in Europe and Australia) is a party video game series originally created by Dragon Quest designer Yuji Horii. The first game was released in Japan on Nintendo's Family Computer console in 1991. Since then, sequels have been released for the Super Famicom and Sony's PlayStation, PlayStation 2, PlayStation Portable and Nintendo DS. The series was exclusive to Japan prior to the Wii iteration.

Dragon Quest, published as Dragon Warrior in North America until 2005, is a series of Japanese role-playing video games created by Yuji Horii and his studio Armor Project. The games are published by Square Enix, with localized versions of later installments for the Nintendo DS and 3DS being published by Nintendo outside of Japan. With its first game published in 1986, there are eleven main-series games, along with numerous spin-off games. In addition, there have been numerous manga, anime and novels published under the franchise, with nearly every game in the main series having a related adaptation.

Yuji Horii Japanese video game designer

Yuji Horii is a Japanese video game designer and scenario writer best known as the creator of the Dragon Quest series of role-playing games, supervising and writing the scenario for Chrono Trigger, as well as the first visual novel adventure game Portopia Serial Murder Case.

Nintendo Japanese video game company

Nintendo Co., Ltd. is a Japanese multinational consumer electronics and video game company headquartered in Kyoto. Nintendo is one of the world's largest video game companies by market capitalization, creating some of the best-known and top-selling video game franchises, such as Mario, The Legend of Zelda, and Pokémon.

Contents

Development

The series originated as a minigame within Dragon Warrior III , and proved so popular it was decided that it should be released as an individual game. [1] Horii in a 1989 interview stated he was working on a board game with former Famitsu editor Yoshimitsu Shiozaki and that working in a "completely different genre" to the Dragon Quest games was worthwhile. [2] [3] While creating the first stage, a play test revealed the board was really hard, so a practice stage was constructed and was also too difficult, leading to stage one eventually becoming stage four. [3] In 2011, game creator Yuji Horii stated he had considered bringing Itadaki Street to international audiences. [4]

A minigame is a short video game often contained within another video game, and sometimes in application software or on a display of any form of hardware. A minigame contains different gameplay elements than the main game, may be optional, and is often smaller or more simplistic than the game in which it is contained. Minigames are sometimes also offered separately for free to promote the main game. For instance, the Pokémon Stadium minigames involve merely pressing a few buttons at specific intervals, with little complexity. Some minigames can also be bonus stages or secret levels.

<i>Famitsu</i> periodical literature

Famitsu, formerly Famicom Tsūshin, is a line of Japanese video game magazines published by Gzbrain, a subsidiary of Kadokawa. Famitsu is published in both weekly and monthly formats as well as in the form of special topical issues devoted to only one console, video game company, or other theme. Shūkan Famitsū, the original Famitsū publication, is considered the most widely read and respected video game news magazine in Japan. From October 28, 2011 the company began releasing the digital version of the magazine exclusively on BookWalker weekly.

Common elements

The games are similar to Monopoly : players roll one die to advance around a board, purchase unowned property they land on and earn money when opponents land on the player's property, and draw cards when they land on certain spaces. [5] The games differ from Monopoly in that players can buy and sell stocks of a block, affecting the value of the block's stock by buying or selling that block's stock or by developing a player-owned property of that block which increases the value per share of stock for that block. It is not necessary to own the entire block to develop a property, though controlling more than one property of a block allows the player to develop their properties to larger buildings and collect more from opponents. Players must collect a set of four suits to level up and collect additional gold when they pass the starting position/bank. In most versions, up to four players can compete to win each board. To win, a player must make it back to the bank with the board's required amount, which includes the total value of the player's stocks, property value, and gold on hand. Minigames and a stock market for more experienced players are also featured. [6]

<i>Monopoly</i> (game) Board game about property trading and management

Monopoly is a board game currently published by Hasbro. In the game, players roll two six-sided dice to move around the game board, buying and trading properties, and developing them with houses and hotels. Players collect rent from their opponents, with the goal being to drive them into bankruptcy. Money can also be gained or lost through Chance and Community Chest cards, and tax squares; players can end up in jail, which they cannot move from until they have met one of several conditions. The game has numerous house rules, and hundreds of different editions exist, as well as many spin-offs and related media. Monopoly has become a part of international popular culture, having been licensed locally in more than 103 countries and printed in more than 37 languages.

Dice throwable object with multiple resting positions, used for generating random outcomes

Dice are small throwable objects that can rest in multiple positions, used for generating random numbers. Dice are commonly used in tabletop games—including dice games, board games, and role-playing games—and for gambling.

Stock market public entity for the trading of company stocks and shares

A stock market, equity market or share market is the aggregation of buyers and sellers of stocks, which represent ownership claims on businesses; these may include securities listed on a public stock exchange, as well as stock that is only traded privately. Examples of the latter include shares of private companies which are sold to investors through equity crowdfunding platforms. Stock exchanges list shares of common equity as well as other security types, e.g. corporate bonds and convertible bonds.

Games

TitleYearPlatformNotes
Itadaki Street: Watashi no Omise ni Yottette
Famicom Itadaki Street: Watashi no Omise ni Yottette was developed by Loginsoft and released on the Famicom on March 21, 1991. It was published by ASCII.
Itadaki Street 2: Neon Sign wa Bara Iro ni
Super Famicom Itadaki Street 2: Neon Sign wa Bara Iro ni operates like a junior version of Super Okuman Chouja Game . Instead of the players making purchases and sales completely on their own, the game offers advice for important situations. There are many themes including modern, futuristic, and the map of the world. Players that are controlled by the game's artificial intelligence range from teenagers to senior citizens. Players can move from 1 to 9 squares and must allow collect symbols from playing cards in order to get money from the bank. Casino gambling is also available and it includes Bingo and slot machines. Like in Tower Dream , the game instantly ends if the only human player gets bankrupt in a game involving 3 AI-controlled players and 1 human-controlled player.
Itadaki Street: Gorgeous King
PlayStation Itadaki Street: Gorgeous King was released on the PlayStation in 1998. It was published by Enix. As of December 2004, the game has sold over 281,000 copies.
Itadaki Street 3 Okumanchouja ni Shite Ageru: Kateikyoushi Tsuki
PlayStation 2 Itadaki Street 3 Okumanchouja ni Shite Ageru: Kateikyoushi Tsuki was developed by Tamsoft/Crea-Tech and released on the PlayStation 2 in 2002. It was published by Enix. In release, the game was sold 163,659 copies in 2002, and Famitsu magazine scored the game a 32 out of 40. [7]
Dragon Quest & Final Fantasy in Itadaki Street Special
PlayStation 2 Dragon Quest & Final Fantasy in Itadaki Street Special was released on December 22, 2004 by Square Enix for the PlayStation 2. One to four players can play at the same time which makes this game different from its predecessors. The game features characters from Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy . As of August 31, 2005, the game has sold 380,000 units in Japan.
Dragon Quest & Final Fantasy in Itadaki Street Portable
PlayStation Portable Dragon Quest & Final Fantasy in Itadaki Street Portable includes characters from Square Enix's Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy video game series, though some reviewers said the franchises did not add much to the game. [8]
Itadaki Street DS
Nintendo DS Itadaki Street DS includes characters from Square Enix's Dragon Quest series and Nintendo's Super Mario franchises, many of which were redrawn to look younger. [9] The game was the second crossover between Nintendo and Square Enix characters. [10] Characters come from a variety of games, and even lesser known character are included such as Yangus the heroic thief from Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King . [11] The games website featured a character creator mixing Mario and Dragon Quest franchises. [12] The Japanese magazine Famitsu gave the game 36/40 points. [13] The game sold 430,000 copies as of August 2008. [14]
Itadaki Street Mobile
Mobile phonesItadaki Street Mobile included no branded characters from any video game franchise. [15] The game was a simplified version of the series, and before release a demo was made available that included Shell Island, one of the beginners boards. [15]
Dragon Quest & Final Fantasy in Itadaki Street Mobile
Mobile phonesDragon Quest & Final Fantasy in Itadaki Street Mobile features Final Fantasy characters from many different Final Fantasy games including Lightning from Final Fantasy XIII in a chibi art style. [16]
Fortune Street

Released in Japan as Itadaki Street Wii(いただきストリートWii) [17] and in Europe as Boom Street

  • JP: 2011-12-01
  • NA: 2011-12-05
  • EU: 2011-12-23 / 2012-01-06
  • AU: 2012-01-05
Wii Fortune Street was revealed by Nintendo at E3 2011 for the Wii, released on December 1, 2011 in Japan, December 5 in North America, December 23 in Europe (or January 6 for another part), and January 5 in Australia. It was the first game in the series to be published outside Japan. [6] The game includes characters from the Dragon Quest series and the Mario series. [18]
Fortune Street Smart

Released in Japan as Itadaki Street for Smartphone(いただきストリート for SMARTPHONE) and in Europe as Boom Street Smart

  • JP: 2012
  • WW: 2012
iOS Fortune Street Smart is an entry in the series developed for smartphones. In Japan, the game was released for Android devices on January 23, 2012 through the Square Enix Market, and for Apple iOS on March 22, 2012 through the App Store. The game was released overseas for iOS on May 31, 2012 through the App Store. It does not feature licensed characters from other series such as Dragon Quest , Final Fantasy and Mario .
Itadaki Street: Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy 30th AnniversaryJP: 2017 [19] PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita Developed by Tose and released in Japan on October 19, 2017.

Reception

IGN gave the series' first localization in America, called "Fortune Street", a "Good" rating, for its deep board game gameplay but saying it could have been more interactive. [20] Siliconera noted that the introduction of established franchise characters from Final Fantasy , Dragon Quest , and the Mario games' has greatly increased the games popularity and mindshare. [21] Fortune Street, the series' first international release, was greeted with mixed reviews, praising the character selection and deep gameplay, but slighting its lengthy time commitment. [22]

<i>IGN</i> American entertainment website

IGN is an American video game and entertainment media website operated by IGN Entertainment Inc., a subsidiary of Ziff Davis, itself wholly owned by j2 Global. The company is located in San Francisco's SOMA district and is headed by its former editor-in-chief, Peer Schneider. The IGN website was the brainchild of media entrepreneur Chris Anderson and launched on September 29, 1996. It focuses on games, films, television, comics, technology, and other media. Originally a network of desktop websites, IGN is now also distributed on mobile platforms, console programs on the Xbox and PlayStation, FireTV, Roku, and via YouTube, Twitch, Hulu, and Snapchat.

Final Fantasy is a Japanese science fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix. The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs/JRPGs). The first game in the series was released in 1987, with 14 other main-numbered entries being released since then. The franchise has since branched into other video game genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm, as well as branching into other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels.

Mario fictional character from Nintendos Mario franchise,

Mario is a fictional character in the Mario video game franchise, owned by Nintendo and created by Japanese video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. Serving as the company's mascot and the eponymous protagonist of the series, Mario has appeared in over 200 video games since his creation. Depicted as a short, pudgy, Italian plumber who resides in the Mushroom Kingdom, his adventures generally center upon rescuing Princess Peach from the Koopa villain Bowser. His younger brother and sidekick is Luigi.

See also

Related Research Articles

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The Slime series is a spinoff series of games from Dragon Quest featuring its Slime character. Three games have been released, the second of which, Dragon Quest Heroes: Rocket Slime, has been released in North America.

<i>Dragon Quest VII</i> role-playing video game

Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past is a Japanese role-playing video game developed by Heartbeat and ArtePiazza, and published by Enix for the PlayStation in 2000. It was released in North America in 2001 under the title Dragon Warrior VII. The game received a remake on the Nintendo 3DS on February 7, 2013 in Japan, which was released in North America and Europe for the Nintendo 3DS under the title Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past in 2016. A version of the game for Android and iOS was also released in Japan on September 17, 2015.

<i>Dragon Quest IV</i> role-playing video game

Dragon Quest IV: Chapters of the Chosen, titled Dragon Warrior IV when initially localized to North America, is a role-playing video game, the fourth installment of the Dragon Quest video game series developed by Chunsoft and published by Enix, and the first of the Zenithian Trilogy. It was originally released for the Famicom on 11 February 1990 in Japan. A North American NES version followed in October 1992, and would be the last Dragon Quest game localized and published by Enix's Enix America Corporation subsidiary prior to its closure in November 1995, as well as the last Dragon Quest game to be localized into English prior to the localization of Dragon Warrior Monsters in December 1999. The game was remade by Heartbeat for the PlayStation, which eventually was available as an Ultimate Hits title. This was followed with a second remake developed by ArtePiazza for the Nintendo DS, released in Japan on 22 November 2007. This remake was released in Australia on 11 September 2008, in Europe on 12 September 2008 and in North America on September 16, 2008. A version based on the Nintendo DS remake for Android and iOS was released in 2014.

<i>Dragon Quest III</i> role-playing video game

Dragon Quest III: The Seeds of Salvation, titled Dragon Warrior III when initially localized to North America, is a role-playing video game developed by Chunsoft and published by Enix. It is the third installment in the Dragon Quest series and was first released for the Family Computer (Famicom) in Japan and later for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in North America. The game saw an enhanced remake for the Super Famicom in 1996 and the Game Boy Color in 2001, and a port to mobile phones and the Wii in 2009 and 2011. A version of the game for Android and iOS was released in Japan on September 25, 2014, and worldwide as Dragon Quest III: The Seeds of Salvation on December 4, 2014. It was the first time the game was given an official English subtitle.

<i>Dragon Quest VIII</i> role-playing video game

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<i>Dragon Warrior Monsters</i> video game

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<i>Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 2</i> video game

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<i>Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 3</i> Video game for the Nintendo 3DS

Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 3 is a role-playing video game developed by Square Enix and Tose and published by Square Enix for the Nintendo 3DS. It is the sequel to Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 2, and is the sixth game in the Dragon Quest Monsters series. It was released in Japan on March 24, 2016.

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