François Sébastien Letourneux

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François Sébastien Letourneux
Born 1752
Saint-Julien-de-Concelles, Loire-Inférieure, France
Died 1814
Saint-Julien-de-Concelles, Loire-Inférieure, France
Nationality French
Occupation Lawyer, politician
Known for Minister of the Interior

François Sébastien Letourneux (17521814) was a French lawyer and politician who was Minister of the Interior under the Directory.

French Directory Executive power of the French Constitution of 1795-1799

The Directory or Directorate was a five-member committee that governed France from 2 November 1795, when it replaced the Committee of Public Safety, until 9 November 1799, when it was overthrown by Napoleon Bonaparte in the Coup of 18 Brumaire, and replaced by the French Consulate. It gave its name to the final four years of the French Revolution.

Contents

Life

François Sébastien Letourneux was born in Saint-Julien-de-Concelles, Brittany, in 1752. He practiced as an advocate before the French Revolution. He was appointed Attorney for the Loire-Inférieure department in 1791. [1] On 23 Fructidor year V (14 September 1797) he was named Minister of the Interior. He replaced François de Neufchâteau, who had been appointed a member of the Directory. He held this position until 30 Messidor year VI (17 June 1798), when Neufchâteau returned to his position as Minister of the Interior on 2 Thermidor year VI. [2] [1]

Saint-Julien-de-Concelles Commune in Pays de la Loire, France

Saint-Julien-de-Concelles is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France.

French Revolution social and political revolution in France and its colonies occurring from 1789 to 1798

The French Revolution was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies beginning in 1789. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies. Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history.

François de Neufchâteau French statesman, poet, and scientist

Nicolas-Louis François de Neufchâteau was a French statesman, poet, and agricultural scientist.

Letourneux, who was inexperienced in national politics, was responsible for enforcing the new republican calendar, with its ten-day weeks. This included finding ways to ensure the calendar was adopted, while holding back over-zealous local officials who wanted, for example, to close churches on the old Sundays and religious holidays. Such church closures would be in conflict with the principle of tolerance of all religions. [3] Under Letourneux's administration the Directory issued the decree of 27 Brumaire Year VI in support of public education, and the decree of 17 Pluviôse year VI requiring special supervision of private educational establishments. [1]

In year VII Letourneux was elected to the Council of Ancients. After 18 Brumaire he entered the judiciary. He died as a judge in 1814. [1]

Council of Ancients the upper house of the French Directory, a.k.a. Council of Elders

The Council of Ancients or Council of Elders was the upper house of French legislature under the Constitution of the Year III, during the period commonly known as the Directory, from 22 August 1795 until 9 November 1799, roughly the second half of the period generally referred to as the French Revolution.

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References

Citations

  1. 1 2 3 4 Letourneux, IFÉ.
  2. Muel 1891, p. 47.
  3. Shusterman 2010, p. 178.

Sources

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.