Fran Nagle

Last updated
Fran Nagle
Biographical details
BornJuly 1, 1924
DiedAugust 15, 2014(2014-08-15) (aged 90)
Playing career
1949–1950 Nebraska
Position(s) Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1953–1954 Doane
Head coaching record
Overall6–10–2

Francis Joseph Nagle [1] (July 1, 1924 August 15, 2014) [2] was an American football player and coach.

Contents

Playing career

Nagle graduated from high school in West Lynn, Massachusetts before playing at the University of Nebraska. As a quarterback at Nebraska, Nagle was the statistical leader for passing yards from 1949 and 1950. [3] He holds a career Nebraska top 25 passing record at 1,289 yards in 190 attempts with 41.6% completions and 13 touchdowns. [3] Nagle was the 43rd pick in the fourth round National Football League draft pick as a back for the Philadelphia Eagles in 1951. [4] In 1952, he was signed by the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League but a training camp injury ended his career.

Honors

In 1950, Nagle was chosen as a Big Seven Conference All-Conference selection. [5] In 1951, Nagle played in the Senior Bowl, the College All-Star game, and the East-West Shrine Game. Nagle was inducted into the Nebraska Football Hall of Fame in 1992. [6]

Coaching career

Nagle was the 25th head football coach at Doane College in Crete, Nebraska and he held that position for two seasons, from 1953 and 1954. His coaching record at Doane was 6–10–2. [7]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Doane Tigers (Nebraska College Conference)(1953–1954)
1953 Doane4–3–23–2–2T–4th
1954 Doane2–72–56th
Doane:6–10–25–7–2
Total:6–10–2

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References

  1. Fran Nagle's obituary
  2. 1 2 Nebraska NCAA Record Holders
  3. Pro-Football-Reference.com, 1951 NFL Draft
  4. "Nebraska Media Guide" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-12. Retrieved 2008-11-11.
  5. Nebraska Football Hall of Fame
  6. Doane College coaching records Archived May 25, 2011, at the Wayback Machine