France national rugby league team

Last updated
France
FFRXIII.png
Team information
NicknamesLes Bleus
Les Tricolores
The Chanticleers (for the Anglophone media)
Governing body Fédération Française de Rugby à XIII
Region Europe
Head coach Laurent Frayssinous
Captain Théo Fages
Most caps Puig Aubert (46)
Top try-scorer Raymond Contrastin (25)
Top point-scorer Puig Aubert (361)
IRL ranking 8th
Uniforms
Kit left arm France2017RLWC.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body France2017RLWC.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm France2017RLWC.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks whitetop.png
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Team results
First international
Flag of England.svg  England 32–21 France  Flag of France.svg
(Paris, France; 15 April 1934)
Biggest win
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 0–120 France  Flag of France.svg
(Beirut, Lebanon; 22 October 2003)
Biggest defeat
Flag of England.svg  England 84–4 France  Flag of France.svg
(Leigh, England; 24 October 2015)
World Cup
Appearances15 (first time in 1954 )
Best resultRunners-up, 1954; 1968

The France national rugby league team represent France in international rugby league matches. They are referred to as les Chanticleers or less commonly as les Tricolores. The team is run under the auspices of the Fédération Française de Rugby à XIII.

Contents

The French rugby league team first played in 1934 on a tour of England. They have taken part in all World Cups, 15 in total, with the first being held in 1954 in France. They have never won the title but finished runners-up in both 1954 and 1968. These are often considered the glory years of French rugby league as from the 1950s to the 1970s the team were strong and regularly beat Australia, New Zealand and Great Britain. Since those days, les Chanticleers have not done as well, not managing to win a single match in the 1995 World Cup, but doing slightly better in 2000 with wins over Tonga and South Africa before losing to eventual finalists, New Zealand.

In 2006, the Perpignan based team Catalans Dragons entered Super League, and have since produced a number of top-class French players. The team reached the quarter-finals of the 2013 World Cup where they were knocked out by England. [1] At the 2017 World Cup, the team failed to qualify for the quarter finals after being eliminated at the group stage.

Currently, France are ranked eighth in the world. In Europe alone they are ranked second, ahead of Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Lebanon, but behind their main rival, England.

History

1930s

The 1934 squad, captained by Jean Gallia (front row, fourth from left). Les Pionniers.jpg
The 1934 squad, captained by Jean Gallia (front row, fourth from left).

On New Year's Eve 1933, England and Australia played in Paris – the first game of rugby league football in France. The match was one-sided, with Australia winning 63-13 in front of a crowd of about 5,000, but the seed was sown. French rugby union players, disgruntled that France had been suspended from the Five Nations Championship, formed the "Ligue Francaise de Rugby à XIII" on 6 April 1934. Jean Galia, a former rugby union international and champion boxer, led France on a six-match tour of England in 1934 and they recorded their first win in Kingston upon Hull. The national team's first game was in Paris on 15 April 1934, losing 21-32 to England in front of a crowd of 20,000. By 1939, the French League had 225 clubs and the national side won the 1938–39 European Rugby League Championship where they became the first French team in any sport to beat England at home. [2]

1940s

The game of rugby league suffered in France during the Second World War, as administrators had rugby league banned. Some players and officials of the sport were punished (not reinstated in the French rugby union), whilst the total assets of the rugby league and its clubs were handed over to the union. After the war the French game was re-established and the French became one of rugby league's major powers, competing in the Rugby League World Cup and in major international series against Great Britain, Australia and New Zealand, despite continuing persecution (including remaining unable to call itself rugby until 1989, being called "jeu à XIII" (the game [played] in 13), which was an expression coined by Jean Gallia [3] ). In 1949, they became the first French sporting team to win at Wembley Stadium.

"The match between France and Great Britain lasted excessively for five minutes" Miroir print" ndeg130 29 November 1948 France-Angleterre novembre 1948.jpg
"The match between France and Great Britain lasted excessively for five minutes" Miroir print" n°130 29 November 1948

1950s

1951 team 1951 French national rugby league team.JPG
1951 team

In 1951 France embarked on their first ever tour of Australasia, coached by Robert Samatan and led by the legendary chain-smoking fullback, Puig Aubert. Their flamboyant style of unorthodox attacking rugby attracted huge crowds. When the two nations met for the first Test, the match became the first "all ticket" international to be staged at the Sydney Cricket Ground, and attracted a crowd of over 60,000. On Saturday 30 June 1951, Australia secured a hard-fought second Test victory over France in Brisbane by 23 points to 11. The third Test took place at Sydney Cricket Ground three weeks later before a crowd of 67,009. Late tries from Duncan Hall and Brian Davies could not prevent the Kangaroos from suffering an embarrassing 35-14 defeat. France played 28 matches during the three-month tour, winning 21 matches, drawing twice and losing just five times.

In November 1951, France met "Other Nationalities" in an International Championship match at the Boulevard, Hull which became known as the "Battle of the Boulevard". Other Nationalities won 17-14 but the match centred on the behaviour of Edouard Ponsinet, who was involved in most of the violence that happened at the game. The Other Nationalities were down to eleven players at one stage, with Arthur Clues being the most serious casualty, hospitalised with head injuries. Eventually Ponsinet was sent off, ten minutes from time after breaking the nose of Jeff Burke. [4] Despite this defeat France went on to retain the title with home victories over England and Wales.

In the 1954 World Cup, which was the first of either rugby code and was instigated by France, Les Tricolores defeated both Australia and New Zealand, and drew with Great Britain to reach the final. This was the closest they went to getting their hands on the World Cup, going down narrowly, 16-12, to Great Britain in the final in Parc des Princes. France donated the original World Cup trophy, but they have never won it.

France repeated the success of their 1951 tour in 1955, with even bigger attendances greeting the team. Puig Aubert had broken his arm just prior to the touring party leaving and did not tour. Despite this, France played splendidly to win the second test in Brisbane (in a spectacular game 29-28 before 45,000 fans at the Brisbane Cricket Ground) and the third test at the SCG. The 1951 and 1955 French sides that toured Australia are still regarded as two of the strongest sides ever to tour that country.

In the 1957 World Cup, held in Australia, the winner was decided by finishing top of the table with no final being played. France finished last, winning one match against New Zealand. History was made when the returning French and British squads visited South Africa and played a series of exhibition matches in Benoni, Durban and East London, all of which were won by the British.

1960s

In the 1960 Rugby League World Cup France failed to win a match, and finished last for the second consecutive time.

On Sunday 8 December 1963, France defeated the Australians in the first Test of a three Test series during the Kangaroo tour of Europe. The match was held in Bordeaux.

France regained strength as the decade went on - defeating Australia quite comprehensively in the 1967-1968 series played in France, winning two games and drawing one.

The French reached the final of the 1968 Rugby League World Cup, the last time they have achieved that feat. They beat both Great Britain and New Zealand to qualify, but lost to Australia in Sydney, and so finished runners-up again.

1970s

The French captain, Georges Ailleres, carried on his teammates' shoulders after a win against England in 1970. 15.03.70 G. Aillieres porte en triomphe a France-Angleterre (1970) - 53Fi549.jpg
The French captain, Georges Ailleres, carried on his teammates' shoulders after a win against England in 1970.

France managed one victory in the 1970 Rugby League World Cup, a narrow win over Australia, who went on to win the Cup in the final. In 1972 France hosted the sixth World Cup and again only got the one win, in the opening match against New Zealand. The trend of underperforming in the World Cup continued for the French in the expanded 1975 tournament in which they got a lone win over Wales and a draw against New Zealand. Two years later in the 1977 World Cup they did not win a single match. But then on the 1978 Kangaroo tour, France beat Australia 13-10 and 11-10. This was Australia's last defeat in an international series or competition until the 2005 Tri-Nations.

1980s

Rugby league in France went through a riotous period at the beginning of the 1980s. The turbulent period was steadied by the influence of French Rugby League guru Jean-François Bouchet, however poor results followed. [5] From 1985 to 1987 the team were beaten by New Zealand in Perpignan, drew with Great Britain in Avignon and were thrashed 52-0 in Carcassonne by Australia. Away from home they suffered a large defeat against Great Britain in Leeds. The team reached a low point when they were forced to forfeit away World Cup games against Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea in the 1985-88 edition because of lack of funds. Their only World Cup win was against Papua New Guinea in front of 3,500 people in Carcassonne.

1990s

In 1990, a Great Britain team including Shaun Edwards, Garry Schofield, Martin Offiah and Denis Betts were embarrassed by a 25-18 loss, France's first victory on English soil for 23 years and their last win over Great Britain/England. The team then met Papua New Guinea on Sunday 30 June 1991 in Rabaul, where they were beaten 28-24. On Sunday 7 July 1991, the two sides met again for a World Cup encounter at Danny Leahy Oval, Goroka. The heat and humidity caused France all kinds of problems, but Les Tricolores squeezed home 20-18.

On Sunday 27 October 1991, the first ever Test match involving the Soviet Union took place at the Stade Georges Lyvet, Villeurbanne, near Lyon, France. The Bears were beaten 26-6 by France. The Papua New Guinea national team wound up their 1991 tour of Europe with a World Cup rated Test match against France, which was played on Sunday 24 November at the Stade Albert Domec, Carcassonne. France defeated their visitors 28-14. In the 1995 World Cup France had to play the Samoans three days after taking a physical pounding from the Welsh in Cardiff.

John Kear was briefly in charge of Les Tricolores in 1997.

France took on Italy at the Parc des Sports, Avignon in November 1999. France needed a draw to win the Mediterranean Cup. The Italians, registered a memorable 14-10 victory, which handed the cup to the Lebanon.

2000s

France traveled to Pretoria for a match against South Africa on Saturday 3 November 2001. The French were too good for a young and inexperienced South African side. They scored four tries in each half, and won 44-6 after leading 24-0 at half-time.

In 2002, France lost to Lebanon 36–6 in front of 9,713 spectators at Tripoli in the Mediterranean Cup final. [6]

France playing against Australia in Toulouse. Fraus04rugby13.jpg
France playing against Australia in Toulouse.

In 2004 the French returned to form with a narrow 20-24 loss to New Zealand and a losing but creditable performance against Australia. In 2005, Les Tricolores played Australia again in Perpignan, suffering a 12-44 defeat. [7] Unlike their last match against Australia, this game was played under normal rules and is considered a regular test match. This was their best performance in an official test match against Australia since 1990.

The French team lining up before their match against New Zealand in the 2009 Four Nations tournament. French rugby league team 2009.JPG
The French team lining up before their match against New Zealand in the 2009 Four Nations tournament.

Papua New Guinea toured France in the winter of 2007, with France winning both matches. After the tour, a match in Paris was scheduled against New Zealand, who were on their way home from a 3-0 test series defeat by Great Britain. A last minute try secured a 22-14 New Zealand win in front of a decent crowd despite Paris rail strikes. [8] France participated in the 2008 World Cup after being granted automatic qualification. They were drawn in Group B with Scotland and Fiji. Winning only one game and losing two, France finished the tournament in last place.

France participated in the first 2009 Four Nations tournament against England, New Zealand and Australia. The following year, the tournament was held in Australia and New Zealand, with France's place being taken by a Pacific qualifier.

2010s

With the Four Nations returning to Europe in 2011, France needed to qualify by winning the 2010 European Cup, but failed to do so, with Wales qualifying instead. In 2011 the English team, rather than playing their annual test against France, instead arranged the inaugural 2011 International Origin match.

France participated in the 2013 Rugby League World Cup and hosted some games. They reached the quarter-finals where they were knocked out by England.

In 2014, France played in the 2014 European Cup. They came second in the tournament on points difference, by only 3 points, finishing behind Scotland therefore failing to qualify for the 2016 Four Nations.

In May 2015, France were set to take on South Africa However, the Africans had to withdraw due to the concerns of national contingencies. Therefore, France announced they'd play Serbia in Saint-Esteve on the 22 May. The French, who were labelled as France 'A' due to not being a full-strength side, went on to hammer the Serbs by 68 points to 8.

In October 2015, France played in the 2015 European Cup. During the tournament in November, after already confirming before the tournament's details were announced, France took on England in Leigh. The match was a warm-up game for England before their end-of-year test-series against New Zealand. The French were hammered by a record 80-point margin. [9]

In August 2016 Richard Agar, who began coaching France at the 2013 World Cup, left the national team. It is believed he left because new Fédération Française de Rugby à XIII president Marc Palanques wants a Frenchman to coach the national team. [10] Aurelien Cologni, who had a temporary spell from 2011-2012, became the new coach.

At the 2017 Rugby League World Cup, France were placed in a strong group, pitted against the likes of England, Lebanon and defending champions Australia. France got off to the worst possible start, suffering a shock loss to Lebanon 29-18 in Canberra. The following two games did not get any better for the French as they were thumped 52-6 by Australia and then suffered another big defeat to their old foes England 36-6 in Perth. [11] [12] [13] They thus failed to move beyond the group stage and were eliminated from the World Cup.

2020s

As the winner of the 2018 Rugby League European Championship, France Qualified for the 2021 Rugby League World Cup, their 16th appearance in the competition.

Identity

Jersey

Kit left arm francerl30s.png
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1931-1940
Kit left arm francerl54.png
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1950-1969
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1970-1975
Kit left arm francerl78.png
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1970s alternate home
Kit left arm francerl77.png
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1975-1981
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1975-1981 Away
Kit left arm francerl80s.png
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1982-1988
Kit left arm whiteborder.png
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Kit socks long.svg
1987 (vs Australia, vs Great Britain)
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1989 (vs Great Britain)
Kit left arm whiteborder.png
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1991 (vs Great Britain)
Kit left arm francerl80s.png
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1989
Kit left arm francerl87.png
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Kit shorts frarlclassic.png
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Kit socks whitetop.png
Kit socks long.svg
1991 (vs Great Britain)
Kit left arm francerl80s.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body francerl89.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm francerl80s.png
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Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks whitetop.png
Kit socks long.svg
1991 (vs New Zealand)
Kit left arm FranceRL1994.png
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1994 Oceania Tour
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1990 (vs Australia), 1995 World Cup
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2000 World Cup
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2008 World Cup
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2013 World Cup Home
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2013 World Cup Away
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2014
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2016
Kit left arm France2017RLWC.png
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2017 World Cup

Traditionally, France wears a blue jersey usually complemented by a red and white chevron on the chest, white shorts and red socks, with the team being nicknamed Les Tricolores. The uniforms feature the Gallic rooster embroidered on the chest, much like their union counterpart. The use of the rooster as badge influenced Eastern Suburbs RLFC, which had uniforms similar to France, to use the rooster as symbol since 1967, being known as Sydney Roosters. Sometimes, France also wears a white jersey in case a colour clash arises.

Kit suppliers and sponsors

PeriodManufacturersSponsors
1970-1977 Le Coq Sportif none
1977-1981 Adidas
1982-1988 O'Neills
1985-86 Nike [14] [15]
1989-1990 Halbro Jiffi Condoms [16]
1990-1991Valpronone
1991-1992MSportCassegrain
1993-1994Power League Peugeot
1995-1996 Coverland
1997-1999 Puma none
2000-2003 Enterasys Networks
2004 Sport+
2005-2006 Canterbury
2007-2008none
2009-2010Rugby ApprovedMutuelles du Rempart
2011-2013 Puma
2014-2016 Erreà
2016Groupe Nicollin
2017Classic Bet
2018-presentMister Marcel

Current squad

Squad selected for the 2021 Rugby League World Cup qualifiers; [17]

Pos.PlayerAgeCapsPointsClub
Fullback Tony Gigot 27 December 1990 (age 30)1256 New Zealand Kiwis colours.svg Toronto Wolfpack
Fullback Hakim Miloudi 26 June 1993 (age 28)24 New Zealand Kiwis colours.svg Toronto Wolfpack
Fullback Tony Maurel 21 April 1993 (age 28)28 ToulouseRLcolours.png Toulouse Olympique
Fullback Morgan Escare 18 October 1991 (age 29)1136 Wigancolours.svg Wigan Warriors
Wing Illias Bergal 6 April 1996 (age 25)30 ToulouseRLcolours.png Toulouse Olympique
Wing Paul Marcon 10 July 1995 (age 26)412 ToulouseRLcolours.png Toulouse Olympique
Wing Gavin Marguerite 12 August 1995 (age 25)00 Catalanscolours.svg Catalans Dragons
Centre Arthur Romano 17 August 1997 (age 23)00 Catalanscolours.svg Catalans Dragons
Centre Bastien Ader 6 June 1991 (age 30)516 ToulouseRLcolours.png Toulouse Olympique
Stand-off Anthony Marion 12 January 1994 (age 27)10 ToulouseRLcolours.png Toulouse Olympique
Stand-off Theo Fages 23 August 1994 (age 26)1212 Saintscolours.svg St. Helens
Scrum-half William Barthau 30 January 1990 (age 31)123 ToulouseRLcolours.png Toulouse Olympique
Scrum-half Lucas Albert 4 July 1998 (age 23)34 Catalanscolours.svg Catalans Dragons
Scrum-half Stanislas Robin 21 October 1990 (age 30)58 ToulouseRLcolours.png Toulouse Olympique
Prop Lambert Belmas 11 August 1997 (age 23)20 Catalanscolours.svg Catalans Dragons
Prop Bastien Canet 26 June 1993 (age 28)10 CarcassonneRLcolours.PNG AS Carcassonne
Prop Maxime Puech 16 March 1994 (age 27)00 ToulouseRLcolours.png Toulouse Olympique
Prop Romain Navarrete 30 June 1994 (age 27)34 Wcatscolours.svg Wakefield Trinity
Hooker Alrix Da Costa 2 October 1997 (age 23)38 Catalanscolours.svg Catalans Dragons
Hooker Charles Bouzinac 10 January 1994 (age 27)11 LezignanRLcolours.PNG Lézignan Sangliers
Second-row Mickael Goudemand 9 April 1996 (age 25)20 Catalanscolours.svg Catalans Dragons
Second-row Benjamin Jullien 1 April 1995 (age 26)60 Catalanscolours.svg Catalans Dragons
Second-row Rhys Curran 7 July 1989 (age 32)34 Broncoscolours.png London Broncos
Loose forward Jason Baitieri 2 July 1989 (age 32)198 Catalanscolours.svg Catalans Dragons

Competitive history

IRL World Rankings
Official Men's Rankings as of July 2021
RankChange*TeamPts%
1Increase2.svg 2Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
2Decrease2.svg 1Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
3Decrease2.svg 1Flag of England.svg  England
4Steady2.svgFlag of Tonga.svg  Tonga
5Steady2.svgFlag of Fiji.svg  Fiji
6Increase2.svg 4Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea
7Steady2.svgFlag of Samoa.svg  Samoa
8Decrease2.svg 2Flag of France.svg  France
9Decrease2.svg 1Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
10Decrease2.svg 1Flag of Lebanon.svg  Lebanon
11Increase2.svg 5Flag of Greece.svg  Greece
12Steady2.svgFour Provinces Flag.svg  Ireland
13Increase2.svg 1Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
14Decrease2.svg 3Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
15Increase2.svg 4Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia
16Increase2.svg 1Flag of Malta.svg  Malta
17Increase2.svg 1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
18Decrease2.svg 3Flag of the United States.svg  United States
19Increase2.svg 4Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
20Decrease2.svg 7Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
21Decrease2.svg 1Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
22Increase2.svg 3Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic
23Increase2.svg 5Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands
24Increase2.svg 7Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey
25Decrease2.svg 1Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
26Increase2.svg 4Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
27Decrease2.svg 6Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
28New.pngFlag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
29Decrease2.svg 2Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg  Solomon Islands
30Increase2.svg 10Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
31Increase2.svg 4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
32Increase2.svg 1Flag of Chile.svg  Chile
33New.pngFlag of Ghana.svg  Ghana
34Increase2.svg 16Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco
35Decrease2.svg 3Flag of Vanuatu.svg  Vanuatu
36Steady2.svgFlag of South Africa.svg  South Africa
37Decrease2.svg 8Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
38New.pngFlag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon
39Decrease2.svg 2Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
40Increase2.svg 1Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia
41Increase2.svg 4Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
42Steady2.svgFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
43Increase2.svg 4Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
44Increase2.svg 4Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria
45Increase2.svg 4Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia
*Change from July 2019

Overall

Below are the France international XIII results up until 24 December 2020. [18]

OpponentPlayedWonDrawnLost% WonForAgaDiff
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 611424522.95%5471476–929
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg British Empire XIII 210150%2325–2
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1100100%7232+40
Dominion XIII 2101100%11110
Flag of England.svg  England 48723914.58%4921256–764
Flag of England.svg England Knights 710614.29%109208–99
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 2002%1862–44
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia 1100100%600+60
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 751945225.33%7961762–966
Four Provinces Flag.svg  Ireland 971177.78%295172+123
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1001%1014–4
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 1100100%3412+22
Flag of Lebanon.svg  Lebanon 410325%80115–35
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 2200100%1528+144
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 561653528.57%5921065–473
Tino Rangatiratanga Maori sovereignty movement flag.svg  Māori 420250%6052+8
Other Nationalities 620433.33%7799–22
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 1491464.29%281249+32
Rest of the World1100100%2120+1
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 8800100%37154+317
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 410325%54126–72
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1190281.82%326198+128
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 2200100%1888+180
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2200100%8623+63
Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 210150%3856–18
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2101100%4922+27
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 432501858.14%713643+70
Total3711351522136.39%55557768–2213

World Cup

World Cup Record
YearRoundPositionPldWinDrawLoss
Flag of France.svg 1954 Second place2/44211
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 1957 Fourth place4/43120
Flag of England.svg 1960 Fourth place4/43030
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Flag of New Zealand.svg 1968 Second place2/44220
Flag of England.svg 1970 Third place3/43120
Flag of France.svg 1972 Third place3/43120
1975 Fifth place5/58161
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Flag of New Zealand.svg 1977 Fourth place4/43030
1985–88 Fifth place5/55131
1989–92 Fourth place4/58260
Flag of England.svg 1995 Group stage9/102020
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Flag of France.svg 2000 Quarter-finals5/164220
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2008 Group stage10/102110
Flag of England.svg Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg 2013 Quarter-finals6/144130
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Flag of New Zealand.svg Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg 2017 Group stage12/143030
Flag of England.svg 2021 000
Total0 Titles15/155915413

Four Nations

Four Nations Record
YearRoundPositionPldWinDrawLoss
Flag of England.svg Flag of France.svg 2009 Fourth place4/43030
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Flag of New Zealand.svg 2010 Not Invited
Flag of England.svg Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg 2011 Did not qualify
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Flag of New Zealand.svg 2014 Not Invited
Flag of England.svg 2016 Did not qualify
Total0 Titles1/53030

European Championship

European Championship Record
YearRoundPositionPldWinDrawLoss
1935 Second place2/32110
1935-36 Third place3/32002
1936-37 Third place3/32002
1938 Third place3/32002
1938-39 Champions1/32200
1945-46 Second place2/32110
1946-47 Third place2/34103
1947-48 Second place2/34202
1948-49 Champions2/34301
1949-50 Fourth place4/43102
1950-51 Champions1/43201
1951-52 Champions1/43201
1952-53 Fourth place4/43003
1953-54 Third place3/43102
1955-56 Second place2/32101
1969-70 Second place2/34210
1975 Third place3/32002
1977 Champions1/32200
1978 Third place3/32002
1979 Second place2/32101
1980 Second place2/32101
1981 Champions1/32200
1935 Third place3/32002
1996 Third place3/32002
2003 Second place2/63120
2004 Group Stage3/62110
2005 Champions1/63300
2009 Not Invited
2010 Second place2/43210
2012 Not Invited
2014 Second place2/43210
2015 Second place2/43210
2018 Champions1/43300
Total8 Titles7/9201460

Honours

Major:
World Cup :
Runners-up (2): 1954, 1968

Regional:
European Championship :
Winners (8): 1938-39, 1948-49, 1950-51, 1951-52, 1977, 1981, 2005, 2011, 2018
Runners-up (11): 1935, 1945-46, 1947-48, 1955-56, 1969-70, 1979, 1980, 2003, 2010, 2014, 2015

National coaches

ManagerFrance careerPWDLWin %
Flag of France.svg Jean Galia 1937-1949
Flag of France.svg Robert Samatan 1951-1954
Flag of France.svg René Duffort
Flag of France.svg Jean Duhau
1954-19607214028.6
Flag of France.svg Jep Lacoste 19684202050.0
Flag of France.svg Puig Aubert 1975
Flag of France.svg Antoine Jimenez 19751001000.0
Flag of France.svg Yves Bégou 19773003000.0
Flag of France.svg Roger Garrigue 1978-19812002000.0
Flag of France.svg Michel Maïque 1982-19831001000.0
Flag of France.svg Louis Bonnery 19842002000.0
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Tas Baitieri 1984-19872011000.0
Flag of France.svg Jacques Jorda 1987-19915104020.0
Flag of France.svg Michel Mazaré 19912002000.0
Flag of France.svg Jean-Christophe Vergeynst 19943003000.0
Flag of France.svg Ivan Grésèque 1994-1996141310007.1
Flag of England.svg John Kear 1997-19985410080.0
Flag of France.svg Patrick Pedrazzani 1998-19995203040.0
Flag of France.svg Gilles Dumas 1999-20042410014041.7
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Mick Aldous 2004-20057304042.9
Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Monie 2005-20097106014.3
Flag of England.svg Bobbie Goulding 2009-201111407036.4
Flag of France.svg Aurelien Cologni 2011-20124202050.0
Flag of England.svg Richard Agar 2013-20159405044.4
Flag of France.svg Renaud Guigue 20151100100.0
Flag of France.svg Aurélien Cologni 2016-20219405044.4
Flag of France.svg Laurent Frayssinous 2021-present0000!

Notable players

See also

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