France women's national football team

Last updated

France
France women's national football team.png
Nickname(s) Les Bleues (The Blues)
Association French Football Federation
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Corinne Diacre
Captain Amandine Henry
Most caps Sandrine Soubeyrand (198)
Top scorer Marinette Pichon (81)
FIFA code FRA
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First colours
Kit left arm fraw19a.png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 4 Steady2.svg(27 September 2019) [1]
Highest3 (December 2014 – June 2017, June 2018)
Lowest10 (September 2009)
First international
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg  France 2–0 England  Flag of England.svg
(Manchester, England; October 1920)
Biggest win
Flag of France.svg  France 14–0 Algeria  Flag of Algeria.svg
(Cesson-Sévigné, France; 14 May 1998)
Flag of France.svg  France 14–0 Bulgaria  Flag of Bulgaria.svg
(Le Mans, France; 28 November 2013)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 7–0 France  Flag of France.svg
(Bad Kreuznach, Germany; 2 September 1992) [2]
World Cup
Appearances4 (first in 2003 )
Best resultFourth place (2011)
European Championship
Appearances6 (first in 1997 )
Best resultQuarter-finals (2009, 2013, 2017)

The French women's national football team (French : Équipe de France féminine de football, sometimes shortened as Féminin A) is directed by the French Football Federation (FFF). The team competes as a member of UEFA in various international football tournaments such as the FIFA Women's World Cup, UEFA Women's Euro, the Summer Olympics, and the Algarve Cup.

French language Romance language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

French Football Federation governing body of association football in France

The French Football Federation (FFF) is the governing body of football in France. It also includes the overseas departments and the overseas collectivities and also in Monaco. It was formed in 1919 and is based in the capital, Paris. The FFF was a founding member of FIFA and is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the game of football in France, both professional and amateur. The French Football Federation is a founding member of UEFA and joined FIFA in 1907 after replacing the USFSA, who were founding members.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Contents

The France women's national team initially struggled on the international stage failing to qualify for three of the first FIFA Women's World Cups and the six straight UEFA European Championships before reaching the quarter-finals in the 1997 edition of the competition. However, since the beginning of the new millennium, France have become one of the most consistent teams in Europe, having qualified for their first-ever FIFA Women's World Cup in 2003 and reaching the quarter-finals in two of the three European Championships held since 2000. In 2011, France recorded a fourth-place finish at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup; its best finish overall at the competition. In the following year, the team captured the 2012 Cyprus Cup and the fourth place at Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

UEFA Womens Championship European association football tournament for womens national teams

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the ‘European Cup’, held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

The 1997 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1997 was a football tournament held in 1997 in Norway and Sweden. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

Corinne Diacre has been the manager of the national team since 30 August 2017. The current captain of the national team is midfielder Amandine Henry. [3]

Corinne Catherine Diacre is a French professional football coach and former football defender. She played throughout her career for ASJ Soyaux in Division 1 as well as the French national team from 1993 to 2005. In August 2014, she became the first woman to coach a men's professional football team in a competitive match in France. She is currently the head coach of the French women's national team.

Captain (sports) member of a sports team

In team sport, captain is a title given to a member of the team. The title is frequently honorary, but in some cases the captain may have significant responsibility for strategy and teamwork while the game is in progress on the field. In either case, it is a position that indicates honor and respect from one's teammates – recognition as a leader by one's peers. In association football and cricket, a captain is also known as a skipper.

Amandine Henry association football player

Amandine Chantal Henry is a French football player who plays as a defensive midfielder for Olympique Lyon and the French national team. A former women's youth international having played all levels, Henry made her senior international debut in 2009.

History

Early history

In 1919, a women's football championship was established in France by the Fédération des Sociétés Féminines Sportives de France (FSFSF). On 29 April 1920, a team led by French women's football pioneer Alice Milliat traveled to England and played its first international match against English team Dick, Kerr's Ladies. The match, held in Preston, attracted more than 25,000 spectators. France won the match 2–0 and ended its tour with two wins, one draw, and one defeat. The following year, a return match in France at the Stade Pershing in Vincennes, a suburb of Paris, took place in front of over 12,000 spectators. The match ended in a 1–1 draw. In May 1921, France returned to England for friendlies. The team won its first match 5–1, then suffered three consecutive defeats. In October 1921, the English team returned to France contesting matches in Paris and Le Havre with both matches ending in stalemates. Despite women's football in England being prohibited by The Football Association in December 1921, France continued to go there on tour for matches. A victory for the French in Plymouth was followed by 0–0 draws in Exeter and Falmouth. By 1932, the female game had been called to an end and the women's league formed in 1919 by the FSFSF was discontinued. The last match by the FSFSF international team was another scoreless draw against Belgium on 3 April 1932.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

Alice Milliat Pioneer of womens sport

Alice Milliat was a pioneer of women's sport in France and around the world. Her lobbying on behalf of female athletes forced the inclusion of women's events in the Olympic Games.

Preston, Lancashire city and the administrative centre of Lancashire, England

Preston is a city and the administrative centre of Lancashire, England, on the north bank of the River Ribble.

Throughout the late 1960s in France, particularly in Reims, local players worked hard to promote awareness and the acceptance of women's football. A year before getting officially sanctioned, France took part in a makeshift European Cup against England, Denmark, and Italy. The tournament was won by the Italians. The Federal Council of the French Football Federation officially reinstated women's football in 1970 and France played its first official international match on 17 April 1971 against the Netherlands in Hazebrouck. [4] That same year, France took part in the unofficial 1971 Women's World Cup, held in Mexico. The ladies continued the pirate games, which just made it into the margins of FIFA's records, until FIFA began overseeing the competition in 1991. Since 1982, UEFA has governed the European games.

Reims Subprefecture and commune in Grand Est, France

Reims is the most populous city in the Marne department, in the Grand Est region of France. Its population in 2013 was of 182,592 in the city proper (commune) and 317,611 in the metropolitan area. The city lies 129 km (80 mi) east-northeast of Paris. Its primary river, the Vesle, is a tributary of the Aisne.

England womens national football team womens national association football team representing England

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

Denmark womens national football team womens national association football team representing Denmark

The Denmark women's national football team represents Denmark in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Danish Football Association (DBU).

Reinstatement

In 1975, the women's football league was officially reinstated, this time with backing from the French Football Federation, the governing body of football in France. Stade Reims was the best team in the country throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, thus constituted much of the French national squad. For the non-official World Cup in 1978 in Taiwan, the team included the entire Reims squad. The team shared the title with Finland, who never actually played the final. Due to receiving minimal support from the French Football Federation, who ultimately looked at women's football as not being highly regarded, France struggled in international competition failing to advance past the first round of qualification in both the 1984 and 1987 UEFA Women's Championship. Francis Coché, who managed the team during these failures, was later replaced by Aimé Mignot. Mignot helped the team finally get past the first round, however, in the quarterfinals, they lost to Italy, which meant they wouldn't appear at the 1989 UEFA Women's Championship. Despite the initial positives, Mignot failed to continue his success with France failing to qualify for both the 1991 and 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup and losing in the first round of qualification in three straight UEFA Women's Championships. After almost a decade in charge, Mignot was replaced by former women's international Élisabeth Loisel.

Taiwan Country in East Asia

Taiwan, officially the Republic of China (ROC), is a state in East Asia. Neighbouring states include the People's Republic of China (PRC) to the west, Japan to the north-east, and the Philippines to the south. The island of Taiwan has an area of 35,808 square kilometres (13,826 sq mi), with mountain ranges dominating the eastern two-thirds and plains in the western third, where its highly urbanised population is concentrated. Taipei is the capital and largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include Kaohsiung, Taichung, Tainan and Taoyuan. With 23.7 million inhabitants, Taiwan is among the most densely populated states, and is the most populous state and largest economy that is not a member of the United Nations (UN).

Finland womens national football team womens national association football team representing Finland

The Finland women's national football team represents Finland in international women's football. The team, controlled by the Football Association of Finland (SPL/FBF), reached the semi-finals of the 2005 European Championship, surprising the female football world having drawn with Sweden and beaten Denmark. Finland hosted the 2009 EC finals.

The qualification for the 1987 European Competition for Women's Football was held between September 26, 1984 & October 12, 1986. The first-placed teams qualified.

With Loisel in charge, the FFF, along with then France national football team manager Aimé Jacquet, moved the women's national team to Clairefontaine, which had quickly become a high-level training facility for male football players. As a result of the move, younger women were afforded the same benefits from the facilities offered by Clairefontaine as the men. The success of female training led to the formation of the Centre National de Formation et d'Entraînement de Clairefontaine, which is now referred to as the female section of the Clairefontaine academy. Under the tutelage of Loisel, the first results appeared encouraging. They reached their first-ever Women's World Cup qualifying for the 2003 edition after defeating England over two legs in a play-off game in London and again at the Stade Geoffroy-Guichard. The match in Saint-Étienne attracted more than 23,000 spectators and was broadcast by the popular French broadcasting company Canal Plus. Loisel's squad later qualified for the 2005 European Championship, where they were knocked out in the group stage. She was eventually sacked after failing to qualify for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Team under Bruno Bini

Loisel was replaced by former football player and now coach Bruno Bini. Bini had been in charge of several France female international youth sides before accepting the role and was tasked with the job of qualifying for UEFA Women's Euro 2009. Due to the success of the Clairefontaine project and the surprising emergence of the French women's first division, Division 1 Féminine, Bini inherited a team full of emerging, young, and influential talent, which included the likes of Camille Abily, Sonia Bompastor, Louisa Necib, Élise Bussaglia, Laura Georges, and Corine Franco. Bini was also provided with leadership from captain Sandrine Soubeyrand. Early results under Bini were extremely positive with France finishing first in their Euro qualifying group only conceded two goals. France also performed well in friendly tournaments, such as the Nordic Cup and Cyprus Cup. At UEFA Women's Euro 2009, France were inserted into the group of death, which consisted of themselves, world powerhouse Germany, no. 7 ranked Norway, and an underrated Iceland. France finished the group with 4 points, alongside Norway, with Germany leading the group. As a result of the competition's rules, all three nations qualified for the quarterfinals. In the knockout rounds, France suffered defeat to the Netherlands losing 5–4 on penalties after no goals were scored in regular time and extra time. [5]

2011 Women's World Cup

The French team at the 2011 Women's World Cup prior to the 2-4 first round loss to Germany on 5 July 2011. FFWM2011 FRA-GER 20110705 imBorussiapark030.jpg
The French team at the 2011 Women's World Cup prior to the 2–4 first round loss to Germany on 5 July 2011.

Bini's next task was to qualify for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup after the disappointment of four years earlier. In the team's qualifying group, France finished the campaign scoring 50 goals and conceded none over the course of ten matches (all wins). On 16 September 2010, France qualified for the World Cup following the team's 3–2 aggregate victory over Italy.

At the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany, France qualified to the knockout stage by finishing in second place in its group after wins over Nigeria and Canada, and a loss to the host team. The team went on to beat England on penalty kicks in the quarterfinals, but lost to the United States in the semi-finals. France finished the competition in fourth place and earned qualification to the Olympic football tournament at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London; it was the nation's first appearance in the competition. Striker Marie-Laure Delie was the only multiple goal scorer for France in the tournament, while defenders Sonia Bompastor and Laura Georges as well as midfielder Louisa Necib were selected to the All-Star Team.

Golden era

France has entered one of the most successful eras in the country's women's football history. In the UEFA Women's Euro 2013 held in Sweden, France stood top of the group, beating Spain, England and Russia to earn its ticket to the quarter-finals. However, Bergeroo's side lost to Denmark in a penalty shootout, thus failing to advance to the semi-finals.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup

In the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup held in Canada, France was listed to Pot 1, and was a favorite to become champions. France was named to Group F, alongside England, Mexico and Colombia. In the opening match against England, a goal from Eugénie Le Sommer gave France a 1–0 victory. However, France was shocked by Colombia in a 2–0 loss, making Colombia only the second Latin American team to win a Women's World Cup match. Therefore, France's third and final group stage match against Mexico was a must-win. France went on to beat Mexico 5–0 to qualify to the knockout round as top of the group.

In the knockout round, France eased past South Korea in a 3–0 win in Montreal to remain at the same location awaiting the quarter-final match against Germany. In the quarter-final match against Germany, despite dominating the majority of the match, France were unable to capitalize on their chances, which ultimately cost them the game. France were finally able to score in the 64th minute through Louisa Nécib, but failed to keep the lead as Célia Šašić scored on an 83rd-minute penalty kick. The score was 1–1 after 120 minutes, resulting in the match to be decided in a penalty shootout, where France's 5th penalty taken by Claire Lavogez was denied by Nadine Angerer, in which France were eliminated from the tournament losing 4–5 on penalty kicks.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017

France won all matches at the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying Group 3. The home matches had sizable crowds, with 7,761 spectators attending the Romania match at the MMArena in Le Mans, 15,028 spectators at the Ukraine match at the Stade du Hainaut in Valenciennes, 24,835 spectators at the Greece match at Roazhon Park in Rennes, and 7,521 spectators at the Albania at Stade Jean-Bouin in Paris. The team scored a win and two draws at the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Group C, and was defeated by England in quarter-finals.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

In March 2015, France was selected to host the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup of the tournament. Having automatically qualified as hosts, France was considered a favorite to win the tournament, along with the United States. The team opened the tournament with four consecutive victories, winning its group and defeating Brazil 2–1 in the round of 16, before falling to the United States in the quarterfinal, 2–1.

Competitive record

For single-match results of the women's national team, see French football single-season articles.

World Cup

YearResultPositionPldWD*LGFGA
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did not qualify
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995
Flag of the United States.svg 1999
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Group stage9th311123
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Did not qualify
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Fourth place4th62131010
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Quarter-finals5th5311103
Flag of France.svg 2019 Quarter-finals5401104
Total4/80 Titles1910363220

Olympic Games

YearResultPositionGPWDLGFGA
Flag of the United States.svg 1996 Did not qualify
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2000
Flag of Greece.svg 2004
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012 Fourth place4th6303118
Flag of Brazil.svg 2016 Quarterfinals6th420272
Flag of Japan.svg 2020 Did not qualify
Flag of France.svg 2024 Qualified as host
Total3/70 Titles105051810

European Championship

YearResultPositionGPWD*LGSGA
1984 Did not qualify
Flag of Norway.svg 1987
Flag of Germany.svg 1989
Flag of Denmark.svg 1991
Flag of Italy.svg 1993
Flag of England.svg Flag of Germany.svg Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Sweden.svg 1995
Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Sweden.svg 1997 Group stage6th311145
Flag of Germany.svg 2001 Group stage7th310257
Flag of England.svg 2005 Group stage6th311145
Flag of Finland.svg 2009 Quarter-final8th412157
Flag of Sweden.svg 2013 Quarter-final5th431082
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2017 Quarter-final6th412133
Total6/120 Titles218762929
*Draws include knockout matches decided by penalty shootout.
**Gold background colour indicates that the tournament was won. Red border colour indicates tournament was held on home soil.

Invitational trophies

Recent schedule and results

The following is a list of matches in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled. [7] [8]

2018

2019

2020

18 September 2020 2021 UEFA Women's EQ GG Serbia  Flag of Serbia.svgvFlag of France.svg  France Serbia

Team

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the squad for the friendly against Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland on 4 October 2019 and the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifier against Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan on 8 October 2019. [9]

Head coach: Corinne Diacre

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
1 GK Sarah Bouhaddi (1986-10-17) 17 October 1986 (age 32)1430 Flag of France.svg Lyon
1 GK Solène Durand (1994-11-20) 20 November 1994 (age 24)00 Flag of France.svg Guingamp
1 GK Pauline Peyraud-Magnin (1992-03-17) 17 March 1992 (age 27)20 Flag of England.svg Arsenal

2 DF Élisa de Almeida (1998-01-11) 11 January 1998 (age 21)00 Flag of France.svg Montpellier
2 DF Julie Debever (1988-04-18) 18 April 1988 (age 31)30 Flag of Italy.svg Internazionale
2 DF Sakina Karchaoui (1996-01-26) 26 January 1996 (age 23)260 Flag of France.svg Montpellier
2 DF Griedge Mbock Bathy (1995-02-26) 26 February 1995 (age 24)535 Flag of France.svg Lyon
2 DF Perle Morroni (1997-10-15) 15 October 1997 (age 21)00 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain
2 DF Wendie Renard (1990-07-20) 20 July 1990 (age 29)11222 Flag of France.svg Lyon
2 DF Marion Torrent (1992-04-17) 17 April 1992 (age 27)250 Flag of France.svg Montpellier
2 DF Aïssatou Tounkara (1995-03-16) 16 March 1995 (age 24)120 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid

3 MF Charlotte Bilbault (1990-06-05) 5 June 1990 (age 29)171 Flag of France.svg Paris FC
3 MF Maéva Clemaron (1992-11-10) 10 November 1992 (age 26)41 Flag of England.svg Everton
3 MF Kenza Dali (1991-07-31) 31 July 1991 (age 28)224 Flag of England.svg West Ham United
3 MF Grace Geyoro (1997-07-02) 2 July 1997 (age 22)231 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain
3 MF Amel Majri (1993-01-25) 25 January 1993 (age 26)494 Flag of France.svg Lyon
3 MF Gaëtane Thiney (1985-10-28) 28 October 1985 (age 33)15958 Flag of France.svg Paris FC

4 FW Viviane Asseyi (1993-11-20) 20 November 1993 (age 25)335 Flag of France.svg Bordeaux
4 FW Delphine Cascarino (1997-02-05) 5 February 1997 (age 22)163 Flag of France.svg Lyon
4 FW Kadidiatou Diani (1995-04-01) 1 April 1995 (age 24)5010 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain
4 FW Valérie Gauvin (1996-06-01) 1 June 1996 (age 23)2212 Flag of France.svg Montpellier
4 FW Marie-Antoinette Katoto (1998-11-01) 1 November 1998 (age 20)41 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain
4 FW Eugénie Le Sommer (vice-captain) (1989-05-18) 18 May 1989 (age 30)16276 Flag of France.svg Lyon

Recent call-ups

The following players were named to a squad in the last 12 months.

Caps and goals may be incorrect.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Justine Lerond (2000-02-29) 29 February 2000 (age 19)00 Flag of France.svg FC Metz v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 31 August 2019
GK Karima Benameur (1989-04-13) 13 April 1989 (age 30)50 Flag of England.svg Manchester City v. Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil, 10 November 2018

DF Ève Périsset (1994-12-24) 24 December 1994 (age 24)170 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
DF Estelle Cascarino (1997-02-05) 5 February 1997 (age 22)10 Flag of France.svg Paris FC v. Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay, 4 March 2019
DF Hawa Cissoko (1997-04-10) 10 April 1997 (age 22)20 Flag of France.svg ASJ Soyaux v. Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay, 4 March 2019
DF Charlotte Lorgere (1994-08-25) 25 August 1994 (age 25)10 Flag of France.svg Guingamp v. Flag of the United States.svg  United States, 19 January 2019

MF Amandine Henry (captain) (1989-09-28) 28 September 1989 (age 30)8613 Flag of France.svg Lyon v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 31 August 2019
MF Léa Khelifi (1999-05-12) 12 May 1999 (age 20)00 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 31 August 2019
MF Élise Bussaglia (1985-09-24) 24 September 1985 (age 34)19130 Flag of France.svg Dijon 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
MF Kheira Hamraoui (1990-01-13) 13 January 1990 (age 29)343 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona v. Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark, 8 April 2019

FW Emelyne Laurent (1998-11-04) 4 November 1998 (age 20)50 Flag of France.svg Lyon v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 31 August 2019
FW Ouleymata Sarr (1995-10-08) 8 October 1995 (age 24)102 Flag of France.svg Lille v. Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay, 4 March 2019
FW Daphné Corboz (1993-06-13) 13 June 1993 (age 26)00 Flag of France.svg FC Fleury 91 v. Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil, 10 November 2018

Previous squads

Statistics

Most capped French players

#NameCareerCapsGoals
1 Sandrine Soubeyrand 1997–201319817
2 Élise Bussaglia 2003–present19130
3 Laura Georges 2001–20181887
4 Camille Abily 2001–201718337
5 Eugénie Le Sommer 2009–present16276
6 Gaëtane Thiney 2007–15958
7 Sonia Bompastor 2000–201215619
8 Louisa Nécib 2005–201614536
9 Sarah Bouhaddi 2004–present1430
10 Élodie Thomis 2005–201714132
*Active players in bold, statistics as of 23 June 2019. [10]

Top France goalscorers

#PlayerCareerGoalsCapsAverage
1 Marinette Pichon 1994–2008811120.72
2 Eugénie Le Sommer 2009–present761620.47
3 Marie-Laure Delie 2009–present651230.53
4 Gaëtane Thiney 2007–present581590.36
5 Camille Abily 2001–2017371830.20
6 Louisa Nécib 2005–2016361450.25
7 Élodie Thomis 2005–2017321410.23
8 Hoda Lattaf 1997–2007311110.28
9 Élise Bussaglia 2003–present301910.16
10 Wendie Renard 2011–present221120.20

Coaching staff

As of 10 October 2017. [11]
PositionNameNationality
Manager Corinne Diacre Flag of France.svg  French
Assistant managerPhilippe JolyFlag of France.svg  French
Goalkeeper coachMichel EttorreFlag of France.svg  French
Fitness TrainerAnthony Grech-AngeliniFlag of France.svg  French
Medical DoctorVincent DetailleFlag of France.svg  French
PhysiotherapistArmelle O'BrienFlag of France.svg  French
PhysiotherapistMaxime GasparFlag of France.svg  French
Press SecretaryJérôme MillagouFlag of France.svg  French
Logistics managerJules WolgustFlag of France.svg  French
Delegation ChiefBrigitte HenriquesFlag of France.svg  French

Overall competition record

CompetitionStageResultOpponentPositionTop scorer
1984 European Championship qualification

1st Stage

1–0 0–3
0–0 2–0
1–1 0–0
Flag of Italy.svg Italy
Flag of Portugal.svg Portugal
Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland
2 / 4 Musset
Musset, Wolf
Musset
1987 European Championship qualification

1st Stage

0–1 3–5
1–3 3–1
0–4 0–1
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgium
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
2 / 4 Constantin, Musset, Romagnoli
?
Flag of Italy.svg 1988 Mundialito
1st Stage
1–1
1–1
Flag of England.svg England
Flag of Italy.svg Italy B
2 / 3 Musset
Bernard
Semifinals0–3 Flag of Italy.svg Italy
Third place0–1 Flag of the United States.svg United States
1989 European Championship qualification


1st Stage


2–0 0–0
5–0 2–0
3–1 0–0
2–2 0–0
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgium
Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg Bulgaria
Flag of Spain.svg Spain
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czechoslovakia
1 / 5 Musset, Puentes
Baracat, Breton, Mismacq, Musset, Puentes
Musset 2, Loisel
Loisel, Romagnoli
Quarterfinals1–2 0–2 Flag of Italy.svg Italy Musset
1991 European Championship qualification
1st Stage
3–1 2–0
0–2 1–4
Flag of Poland.svg Poland
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
2 / 3 Mismacq 2, Le Boulch, Jézéquel, Musset
Jézéquel
1993 European Championship qualification
1st Stage
1–4 0–4
1–1 5–1
Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark
Flag of Finland.svg Finland
2 / 3 Jézéquel
Fusier 2, Bernauer, Cassauba, Locatelli, Petit
1995 European Championship qualification

1st Stage

0–2 1–1
1–0 3–0
1–0 3–0
Flag of Italy.svg Italy
Flag of Portugal.svg Portugal
Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland
2 / 4 Sykora
Sykora 2, Gout, Richoux
Béghé, Guitti, Hillion, Pichon
1997 European Championship qualification

1st Stage

3–3 3–0
0–0 0–1
1–1 2–1
Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland
Flag of Russia.svg Russia
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands
2 / 4 Pichon 4, Sykora + 1 o.g.

Gout, Olive, Pichon
Repechage2–0 3–0 Flag of Finland.svg Finland Pichon 2, Diacre, Roujas, Woock
Flag of Norway.svg / Flag of Sweden.svg 1997 European Championship

1st Stage

1–1
3–1
0–3
Flag of Spain.svg Spain
Flag of Russia.svg Russia
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
3 / 4 Roujas
Roujas 3
1999 World Cup qualification

1st Stage (Class A)

2–1 3–0
2–2 0–1
0–0 2–3
Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland
Flag of Finland.svg Finland
Flag of Italy.svg Italy
3 / 4 Lattaf 2, Lagrevol, Roujas + 1 o.g.
Lagrevol, Pichon
Pichon, Soubeyrand
2001 European Championship qualification

1st Stage (Class A)

2–2 2–0
1–1 2–1
1–0 2–1
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands
Flag of Spain.svg Spain
1 / 4 Jézéquel 2, Herbert, Zenoni
Diacre 2, Lattaf
Béghé 2, Diacre
Flag of Germany.svg 2001 European Championship

1st Stage

0–3
3–4
2–0
Flag of Norway.svg Norway
Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark
Flag of Italy.svg Italy
4 / 4
Béghé, Blouet, Pichon
Jézéquel, Pichon
2003 World Cup qualification

1st Stage (Class A)

0–3 1–3
2–0 2–1
2–1 4–1
Flag of Norway.svg Norway
Flag of Ukraine.svg Ukraine
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Czech Republic
2 / 4 Pichon
Pichon 3, Soubeyrand
Pichon 3, Béghé, Blouin, Soubeyrand
Repechage1–0 1–0 Flag of England.svg England Diacre, Pichon
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 World Cup

1st Stage

0–2
1–0
1–1
Flag of Norway.svg Norway
Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
Flag of Brazil.svg Brazil
3 / 4
Pichon
Pichon
2005 European Championship qualification


1st Stage (Class A)


4–0 6–0
2–0 3–0
7–1 5–1
3–0 2–5
Flag of Hungary.svg Hungary
Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland
Flag of Poland.svg Poland
Flag of Russia.svg Russia
1 / 5 Pichon 5, Lattaf 2, Béghé, Bompastor, Tonazzi
Lattaf 2, Tonazzi 2, Béghé
Pichon 6, Diacre, Diguelman, Herbert, Lattaf, Tonazzi, Woock
Lattaf 2, Pichon 2, Tonazzi
Flag of England.svg 2005 European Championship

1st Stage

3–1
1–1
0–3
Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Italy
Flag of Norway.svg Norway
Flag of Germany.svg Germany
3 / 4 Pichon 2, Lattaf
Béghé
2007 World Cup qualification


1st Stage (Class A)


0–1 2–0
3–1 2–1
2–0 5–0
0–0 1–1
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands
Flag of Austria.svg Austria
Flag of Hungary.svg Hungary
Flag of England.svg England
2 / 5 Soubeyrand 2
Bussaglia 2, Soubeyrand 2, Pichon
Pichon 2, Soubeyrand 2, Bompastor, Lattaf, Tonazzi
Diguelman
2009 European Championship qualification


1st Stage


6–0 5–0
6–0 2–0
0–1 2–1
8–0 2–0
Flag of Greece.svg Greece
Flag of Slovenia.svg Slovenia
Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland
Flag of Serbia.svg Serbia
1 / 5 Abily 3, Soubeyrand 2, Lattaf, Nécib, Franco, Herbert, Thomis
Bussaglia 2, Lattaf 2, Abily, Thiney, Thomis + 1 o.g.
Herbert, Soubeyrand
Brétigny 3, Thomis 2, Abily, Bussaglia, Nécib, Thiney, Traïkia
Flag of Finland.svg 2009 European Championship

1st Stage

3–1
1–5
1–1
Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland
Flag of Germany.svg Germany
Flag of Norway.svg Norway
3 / 4 Abily, Bompastor, Nécib
Thiney
Abily
Quarterfinals0–0 (PSO: 4–5) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands Soccerball shad check.svg: 1 Soubeyrand, 2 Abily, 3 Henry, 4 Le Sommer Soccerball shade cross.svg: 5 Franco, 6 Meilleroux, 7 Herbert
2011 World Cup qualification



1st Stage



7–0 3–0
2–0 1–0
12–0 6–0
2–0 7–0
6–0 4–0
Flag of Croatia.svg Croatia
Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland
Flag of Estonia.svg Estonia
Flag of Serbia.svg Serbia
Ulster Banner.svg Northern Ireland
1 / 6 Delie 2, Franco 2, Le Sommer 2, Abily, Soubeyrand, Thiney, Thomis
Thiney 2, Thomis
Delie 4, Thiney 4, Herbert 2, Thomis 2, Abily, Bussaglia, Franco, Nécib, Le Sommer + 1 o.g.
Thiney 4, Abily 2, Bussaglia, Delie, Thomis
Bompastor 2, Delie 2, Le Sommer 2, Abily, Franco, Nécib + 1 o.g.
Direct qualification0–0 3–2 Flag of Italy.svg Italy Bussaglia, Thiney, Bompastor
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 World Cup

1st Stage

1–0
4–0
2–4
Flag of Nigeria.svg Nigeria
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Canada
Flag of Germany.svg Germany
2 / 4 Delie
Thiney 2, Abily, Thomis
Delie, Georges
Quarterfinals1–1 (PSO: 4–3) Flag of England.svg England BussagliaSoccerball shad check.svg: 2 Bussaglia, 3 Thiney, 4. Bompastor, 5 Le Sommer Soccerball shade cross.svg: 1 Abily
Semifinals1–3 Flag of the United States.svg United States Bompastor
Third place1–2 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden Thomis
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012 Summer Olympics

1st Stage

2–4
5–0
1–0
Flag of the United States.svg United States
Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
Flag of Colombia.svg Colombia
2 / 4 Delie, Thiney
Catala, Delie, Georges, Renard, Thomis
Thomis
Quarterfinals2–1 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden Georges, Renard
Semifinals1–2 Flag of Japan.svg Japan Le Sommer
Bronze match0–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Canada
2013 European Championship qualification


1st Stage


5–0 5–0
3–1 4–0
4–1 4–0
2–0 5–0
Flag of Israel.svg Israel
Flag of Ireland.svg Ireland
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Wales
Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland
1 / 5 Thiney 3, Abily, Bompastor, Delie, Franco, Rubio, Le Sommer + 1 o.g.
Le Sommer 3, Delie, Morel, Nécib, Thomis
Thomis 3, Thiney 2, Abily, Delie, Le Sommer
Delie 2, Le Sommer 2, Nécib, Renard + 1 o.g.
Flag of Sweden.svg 2013 European Championship

1st Stage

3–1
1–0
3–0
Flag of Russia.svg Russia
Flag of Spain.svg Spain
Flag of England.svg England
1 / 4 Delie 2, Le Sommer
Renard
Le Sommer, Necib, Renard
Quarterfinals1–1 (PSO: 2–4) Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark NecibSoccerball shad check.svg: 2 Thiney, 3 Le Sommer Soccerball shade cross.svg: 1 Necib, 4 Delannoy
2015 World Cup qualification



1st Stage



4–0 7–0
3–1 3–1
10–0 14–0
4–0 4–0
2–0 3–1
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg Kazakhstan
Flag of Austria.svg Austria
Flag of Bulgaria.svg Bulgaria
Flag of Hungary.svg Hungary
Flag of Finland.svg Finland
1 / 6 Thiney 4, Delie 3, Abily 2, Delannoy, Thomis
Bussaglia, Delie, Henry, Necib, Renard, Thomis
Thiney 8, Le Sommer 5, Renard 4, Delie 3, Abily, Bussaglia, Georges, Necib
Le Sommer 2, Abily, Delie, Majri, Thiney, Thomis + 1 o.g.
Necib 2, Bussaglia, Delie, Thiney
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 World Cup

1st Stage

1–0
0–2
5–0
Flag of England.svg England
Flag of Colombia.svg Colombia
Flag of Mexico.svg Mexico
1 / 4 Le Sommer

Le Sommer 2, Delie, Henry + 1 o.g.
Round of 163–0 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea Delie 2, Thomis
Quarterfinals1–1 (PSO: 4–5) Flag of Germany.svg Germany NecibSoccerball shad check.svg: 1 Thiney, 2 Abily, 3 Necib, 4 Renard Soccerball shade cross.svg: 5 Lavogez
2017 European Championship qualification


1st Stage


6–0
3–0 1–0
3–0 1–0
3–0 4–0
Flag of Albania.svg  Albania
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
1 / 5 Houara 2, Le Sommer 2, Le Bihan 2
Le Sommer 2, Bilbault, Le Bihan
Le Sommer 2, Delie, Bussaglia
Majri 2, Delie, Bussaglia, Hamraoui, Abily + 1 o.g.
Flag of Brazil.svg 2016 Summer Olympics

1st Stage

4–0
0–1
3–0
Flag of Colombia.svg Colombia
Flag of the United States.svg United States
Flag of New Zealand.svg New Zealand
2 / 4 Le Sommer, Abily, Majri + 1 o.g.

Le Sommer, Cadamuro 2
Quarterfinals0–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Canada

Media coverage

France women's matches broadcasting rights from 2014 until 2018 belong to Canal+ Group channels D8 and D17. [12]

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

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  2. "Tous les matchs – FFF". Fff.fr. Retrieved 24 September 2016.
  3. Equipe de France [@equipedefrance] (24 October 2017). "Corinne Diacre l'a annoncé après le match #FRAGHA, @amandinehenry6 est la nouvelle capitaine des Bleues ! ©️🇫🇷" (Tweet) via Twitter.
  4. Longman, Jeré (25 June 2019). "In Women's World Cup Origin Story, Fact and Fiction Blur". The New York Times . p. B10. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  5. "Bini: The truth is on the pitch". FIFA.com. 10 May 2012. Archived from the original on 20 July 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  6. Cyprus Cup
  7. France Games
  8. France – Calendar
  9. https://www.fff.fr/actualites/186027-la-liste-devoilee-le-jeudi-26-septembre?themePath=equipes-de-france-1/
  10. "Toutes les sélectionnées" (in French). Footofeminin. Retrieved 23 November 2014.
  11. "STAFF DE LA SÉLECTION". Fff.fr. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  12. "TV Rights: Women national team on D8 and D17, the League on Eurosport and France4". Foot d'Elles (in French). Eurosport. 31 January 2014.