Frances Howard, Countess of Surrey

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Frances Howard, by Hans Holbein the Younger, c. 1535 Hans Holbein the Younger - Frances, Countess of Surrey RL 12214.jpg
Frances Howard, by Hans Holbein the Younger, c. 1535

Frances Howard, (néede Vere), Countess of Surrey (c. 1517 [1] – 30 June 1577) was the daughter of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford, and Elizabeth Trussell. She married firstly, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, [1] son of Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, and his wife Elizabeth Stafford, by whom she had two sons and three daughters:

Late in 1546, while Frances was expecting her fifth child (Katherine), her husband was accused of treason and he was subsequently executed in January 1547. [2]

She married secondly Thomas Staynings, by whom she had two children, a son Henry and a daughter Mary. Mary married Charles Seckford. [3]

She died at Earl Soham, Suffolk and was buried at Framlingham Church in Suffolk. In 1614 her first husband was later reburied next to her.

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References

  1. 1 2 David M. Head (1 January 1995). The Ebbs and Flows of Fortune: The Life of Thomas Howard, Third Duke of Norfolk. University of Georgia Press. pp. 249–. ISBN   978-0-8203-1683-3.
  2. William A. Sessions (2003). Henry Howard, the Poet Earl of Surrey: A Life. Oxford University Press. pp. 202–. ISBN   978-0-19-818625-0.
  3. "SECKFORD, Charles (1551-92), of Great Bealings, Suff. - History of Parliament Online". Historyofparliamentonline.org. Retrieved 17 March 2019.

Further reading