Francis Goodwin (architect)

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Francis Goodwin
Born(17-05-02)2 May 17
Kings Lynn, Norfolk, England
Died 30 August 1835(1835-08-30) (aged 51)
near Portman Square, London
Resting place Kensal Green Cemetery
Nationality English
Occupation Architect

Francis Goodwin (23 May 1784 – 30 August 1835) was an English architect.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Architect person trained to plan and design buildings, and oversee their construction

An architect is a person who plans, designs and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings that have human occupancy or use as their principal purpose. Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek, i.e., chief builder.

Contents

Biography

He was born in Kings Lynn, Norfolk, the eldest son of William Goodwin, who was a carpenter. He was trained as an architect by J. Coxedge in Kensington, London. In 1806 he exhibited a view of a chapel in Kings Lynn at the Royal Academy. He married twice, in 1808 to Mary Stort, and in 1818 to Elizabeth Reynolds. From the marriages he had at least five sons. [1]

Norfolk County of England

Norfolk is a county in East Anglia in England. It borders Lincolnshire to the northwest, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and, to the north-west, The Wash. The county town is Norwich. With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile. Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King's Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000).

Kensington district within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in central London

Kensington is a district in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, West London, England.

Goodwin started his architectural career with work on two churches in Kings Lynn, His big opportunity came with the passing of the Church Building Act of 1818 which granted £1 million (equivalent to £61 million in 2016) [2] for the building of what became known as Commissioners' churches. Nine of the churches he designed for the commissioners were accepted and completed. He designed new churches for other clients, and also rebuilt or remodelled churches. Goodwin received commissions for civic buildings, in particular town halls for Manchester and Macclesfield, markets for Leeds and Salford, and for Derby Gaol. Most of the designs for churches were in Gothic Revival style, while those for the civic buildings were mainly Neoclassical. Later in his career he became involved with domestic architecture, in particular in designing Lissadell House in County Sligo, Ireland, for Sir Robert Gore-Booth. [1] In 1833 Goodwin self-published his work entitled Domestic Architecture, being a series of designs for mansions, villas ... in the Grecian, Italian, and old English style of architecture. [3]

Commissioners church type of Anglican church

A Commissioners' church, also known as a Waterloo church and Million Act church, is an Anglican church in the United Kingdom built with money voted by Parliament as a result of the Church Building Acts of 1818 and 1824. The 1818 Act supplied a grant of money and established the Church Building Commission to direct its use, and in 1824 made a further grant of money. In addition to paying for the building of churches, the Commission had powers to divide and subdivide parishes, and to provide endowments. The Commission continued to function as a separate body until the end of 1856, when it was absorbed into the Ecclesiastical Commission. In some cases the Commissioners provided the full cost of the new church; in other cases they provided a partial grant and the balance was raised locally. In total 612 new churches were provided, mainly in expanding industrial towns and cities.

Gothic Revival architecture Architectural movement

Gothic Revival is an architectural movement popular in the Western World that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time. Gothic Revival draws features from the original Gothic style, including decorative patterns, finials, lancet windows, hood moulds and label stops.

Neoclassical architecture is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century. In its purest form, it is a style principally derived from the architecture of classical antiquity, the Vitruvian principles, and the work of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio.

In 1830 Goodwin prepared and published a stunning Classical design for a ‘Grand National Cemetery’ to be laid out probably at Primrose Hill ‘intended for the prevention of the Danger and Inconvenience of Burying the Dead within the Metropolis: Proposed to be erected by a Capital of 400,000 l. [i.e. £] in 16,000 shares at 25 l. each’. A copy of the prospectus is in the Guildhall Library. The Grand National Cemetery was not completed.[ citation needed ]

Goodwin worked from an office near Bedford Square, London. According to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography he used highly competitive measures to acquire commissions, and used employees to "chase commissions" in the Midlands and northern England using "the stagecoach system". He "inundated committees" with designs, and undercut his rivals' estimates. He also created unaccepted designs for a number of major buildings, including for King's College, Cambridge, Birmingham grammar school, and the new Houses of Parliament. Goodman died suddenly from "apoplexy" in 1835 at his home near Portman Square, London, and was buried in Kensal Green Cemetery. [1]

Bedford Square garden square in the Borough of Camden in London, England

Bedford Square is a garden square in the Bloomsbury district of the Borough of Camden in London, England.

Stagecoach type of covered wagon

A stagecoach is a four-wheeled public coach used to carry paying passengers and light packages on journeys long enough to need a change of horses. It is strongly sprung and generally drawn by four horses.

Kings College, Cambridge college of the University of Cambridge

King's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England. Formally The King's College of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge, the college lies beside the River Cam and faces out onto King's Parade in the centre of the city.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Port, M H (2004), "Goodwin, Francis (1784–1835)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography , Oxford University Press , retrieved 19 December 2011(subscription or UK public library membership required)
  2. UK Retail Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Clark, Gregory (2017). "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  3. Domestic Architecture, Google Books, retrieved 18 December 2011