Francis I, Duke of Brittany

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Francis I
Franta1.jpg
Duke of Brittany; Count of Montfort
Reign29 August 1442 – 17 July 1450
Predecessor John V
Successor Peter II
Born11 May 1414
Vannes
Died17 July 1450(1450-07-17) (aged 36)
Château de l'Hermine, Vannes.
Burial
SpouseYolande of Anjou
Isabella of Scotland
IssueRenaud, Count of Montfort
Margaret, Duchess of Brittany
Marie, Viscountess of Rohan
House Montfort
Father John V, Duke of Brittany
Mother Joan of France
Religion Roman Catholicism

Francis I (in Breton Fransez I, in French François I) (11 May 1414 – 17 July 1450), was Duke of Brittany , Count of Montfort and titular Earl of Richmond , from 29 August 1442 to his death. He was born in Vannes, the son of John V, Duke of Brittany and Joan of France, the daughter of King Charles VI of France.

Contents

Family

Francis I was originally engaged to Bonne of Savoy, the daughter of Amadeus VIII, Duke of Savoy and his wife Mary of Burgundy, Duchess of Savoy. She died just before their marriage in 1430, at the age of 15. [1]

Francis I's first marriage was to Yolande of Anjou, daughter of Louis II, Duke of Anjou and Yolande of Aragon; they were married in Nantes in August 1431. [2] Francis and Yolande had a son, Renaud, Count of Montfort. His son Renaud died young and his wife Yolande died in 1440. [3]

His second marriage was to Isabel of Scotland (daughter of James I, King of Scots and Joan Beaufort); he married Isabel at the Château d'Auray on 30 October 1442. Francis and Isabel had two daughters:

Succession

Francis I died on 17 July 1450 at the Château de l'Hermine, being only 36 years of age. Because he had no surviving male heirs at the time of his death, he was succeeded as Duke of Brittany by his younger brother, Peter II of Brittany.

During his time, the residences of the Dukes of Brittany consisted of: the Château de l'Hermine; the Château de Nantes; the Château de Clisson; and the Château de Suscinio.

Ancestry

See also

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References

  1. Chaubet, Daniel (1984). "Une enquête historique en Savoie au XVe siècle". Journal des Savants (in French). 1 (1): 112, n. 45. doi:10.3406/jds.1984.1477.
  2. "Genealogy of François I on the site Medieval Lands".
  3. Meuret, F.C. (1837). Annales de Nantes (in French). Suireau. p. 262.
Francis I, Duke of Brittany
Regnal titles
Preceded by Duke of Brittany
Count of Montfort

1442–1450
Succeeded by
Peerage of England
Preceded by TITULAR 
Earl of Richmond
1442–1450
Succeeded by