Francis P. Wall

Last updated
Francis P. Wall
Playing career
1915 Boston College
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1917 NYU
Head coaching record
Overall2–2–3

Francis P. Wall was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at New York University (NYU) for one season in 1917, compiling a record of 2–2–3. Wall played college football at Boston College. [1]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
NYU Violets (Independent)(1917)
1917 NYU 2–2–3
NYU:2–2–3
Total:2–2–3

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References

  1. "N. Y. U. Has New Coach; F. P. Wall Take Charge of Eleven and Hold Indoor Drill" (PDF). The New York Times . October 10, 1917. Retrieved February 8, 2014.