Francis Robartes

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Francis Robartes FRS (c. 1649 – 3 February 1718) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1673 and 1718.

Fellow of the Royal Society Elected Fellow of the Royal Society, including Honorary, Foreign and Royal Fellows

Fellowship of the UK Royal Society is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of London judges to have made a 'substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science, and medical science'.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Contents

Early life

Robartes was the fourth son of John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor and his second wife Letitia Isabella Smythe (1630–1714). He was baptised at Lanhydrock in Cornwall on 6 January 1650. He was at school at Chelsea under Mr Cary and was admitted at Christ's College, Cambridge on 2 May 1663 aged 13. Robartes was known as a musical composer and a writer on the theory of sound. He became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1673. [1]

John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor 1st Earl of Radnor

John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor and Viscount Bodmin, known as The Lord Robartes between 1634 and 1679, was an English politician, who fought for the Parliamentary cause during the English Civil War. He retired from public life before the trial and execution of Charles I (1649) and did not take an active part in politics until after the Restoration (England) in 1660. During the reign of Charles II he opposed the Cavalier party. Towards the end of his life he opposed the more extreme Protestant groups, led by Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, who refused to accept the succession of James because he was a self-declared Catholic.

Lanhydrock civil parish in Cornwall, England

Lanhydrock is a civil parish centred on a country estate and mansion in Cornwall, United Kingdom. The parish lies south of the town of Bodmin and is bounded to the north by Bodmin parish, to the south by Lanlivery parish and to the west by Lanivet parish. The population was 171 in the 2001 census. This increased to 186 in the 2011 census. The Parish Council meets every two months in Lanhydrock Memorial Hall.

Cornwall County of England

Cornwall is a county in South West England, bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by Devon, the River Tamar forming the border between them. Cornwall is the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The southwesternmost point is Land's End and the southernmost Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 563,600 and an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). It is administered by Cornwall Council, apart from the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately. The county town is Truro, Cornwall's only city.

Political career

In 1673, Robartes was elected Member of Parliament for Bossiney in the Cavalier Parliament and sat until 1679. [2] He was elected MP for Cornwall in 1679 and sat until 1681. [2] He was elected for Cornwall again in 1685 and sat until 1687. In 1689 he was elected MP for Lostwithiel and sat until 1690 [2] when he was re-elected for Cornwall. He was elected MP for Tregony in 1695 and sat until 1702 [2] when he was elected MP for Bodmin. [2] He sat for Bodmin until 1708, for Lostwithiel again from 1709 to 1710 and for Bodmin from 1710 to 1718. He was a Teller of the Exchequer from 1704 to 1710.

Bossiney was a parliamentary constituency in Cornwall, one of a number of Cornish rotten boroughs, and returned two Members of Parliament to the British House of Commons from 1552 until 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Cavalier Parliament ruling body of 17th century England

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679. It was the longest English Parliament, enduring for nearly 18 years of the quarter-century reign of Charles II of England. Like its predecessor, the Convention Parliament, it was overwhelmingly Royalist and is also known as the Pensioner Parliament for the many pensions it granted to adherents of the King.

Cornwall is a former county constituency covering the county of Cornwall, in the South West of England. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of England then of the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Knights of the Shire, elected by the bloc vote system.

Later life

Robartes became a vice-president of the Royal Society. [3] He was the brother of Robert Robartes and Hender Robartes. [1] Robartes married firstly Penelope Pole, daughter of Sir Courtenay Pole, 2nd Baronet and Urith Shapcote, but had no issue. He married secondly Lady Anne Fitzgerald, daughter of Wentworth Fitzgerald, 17th Earl of Kildare and Lady Elizabeth Holles, and widow of Hugh Boscawen of Tregothnan, and their son, John, inherited the title of 4th Earl of Radnor.

Royal Society English learned society for science

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded on 28 November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society". It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world. The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement.

Robert Robartes, Viscount Bodmin was an cornish diplomat and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1660 and 1679. He was later ambassador to Denmark.

Hender Robartes was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1660 to 1687.

Robartes died at Chelsea, London, aged 68. [1]

Ancestry

John Robartes
Richard Robartes, 1st Baron Robartes
Philip Gaverigan
John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor
John Hender of Botreaux Castle
Frances Hender
Francis Robartes
Sir Thomas Smythe
Sir John Smythe
Sarah Blount
Isabella Smythe
Robert Rich, 1st Earl of Warwick
Isabella Rich
Penelope Devereux, Lady Rich

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Robartes, Francis (RBRS663F)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 History of Parliament Online - Robartes, Francis
  3. "Concerning the Proportion of Mathematical Points to Each Other. By the Honourable Francis Robartes Esq; Vice-President of the Royal Society". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. 27: 325–336, 470–472. 1710. doi:10.1098/rstl.1710.0050.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Robert Robartes
Richard Rous
Member of Parliament for Bossiney
1673–1679
With: Robert Robartes
Succeeded by
John Tregagle
William Coryton
Preceded by
Jonathan Trelawny
Sir John Coryton, Bt
Member of Parliament for Cornwall
1679–1681
With: Sir Richard Edgcumbe
Succeeded by
Lord Lansdown
Viscount Bodmin
Preceded by
Lord Lansdown
Viscount Bodmin
Member of Parliament for Cornwall
1685–1687
With: Lord Lansdown
Succeeded by
Sir John Carew, Bt
Hugh Boscawen
Preceded by
Sir Robert Southwell
Sir Matthias Vincent
Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel
1689 –1690
With: Walter Kendall
Succeeded by
Sir Bevil Granville
Walter Kendall
Preceded by
Sir John Carew, Bt
Hugh Boscawen
Member of Parliament for Cornwall
1690–1695
With: Hugh Boscawen
Succeeded by
John Speccot
Hugh Boscawen
Preceded by
The Earl of Kildare
Hugh Fortescue
Member of Parliament for Tregony
1695–1702
With: James Montagu 1695-1698
Philip Meadowes 1698-1701
Hugh Fortescue 1701-1702
Succeeded by
Hugh Boscawen
Joseph Sawle
Preceded by
John Grobham Howe
John Hoblyn
Member of Parliament for Bodmin
1702–1708
With: John Hoblyn 1702-1706
Thomas Herne 1706-1708
Succeeded by
John Trevanion
Russell Robartes
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
James Kendall
Joseph Addison
Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel
1709– 1710
With: Russell Robartes 1709
Horatio Walpole 1710
Succeeded by
John Hill
Hugh Fortescue
Preceded by
John Trevanion
Russell Robartes
Member of Parliament for Bodmin
1710–1718
With: Russell Robartes 1710-1713
Thomas Sclater 1713-1715
John Legh 1715-1718
Succeeded by
Charles Beauclerk
John Legh