Francis Scott, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch

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Francis Scott, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch, KT, FRS (11 January 1695 – 22 April 1751) was a Scottish nobleman.

Order of the Thistle order of chivalry associated with Scotland

The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle is an order of chivalry associated with Scotland. The current version of the Order was founded in 1687 by King James VII of Scotland who asserted that he was reviving an earlier Order. The Order consists of the Sovereign and sixteen Knights and Ladies, as well as certain "extra" knights. The Sovereign alone grants membership of the Order; he or she is not advised by the Government, as occurs with most other Orders.

Fellow of the Royal Society Elected Fellow of the Royal Society, including Honorary, Foreign and Royal Fellows

Fellowship of the Royal Society is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of London judges to have made a 'substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science, and medical science'.

The Peerage of Scotland is the section of the Peerage of the British Isles for those peers created by the King of Scots before 1707. Following that year's Treaty of Union, the Kingdom of Scots and the Kingdom of England were combined under the name of Great Britain, and a new Peerage of Great Britain was introduced in which subsequent titles were created.

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Family background

Buccleuch was the son of Sir James Scott, Earl of Dalkeith (son of James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth and Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch) and Lady Henrietta Hyde, daughter of Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester. Through his father, Charles II of England was his great-grandfather. Scott was baptised on 20 January 1695 in St. James's Church, Westminster. [1] [2]

James Scott, Earl of Dalkeith Scottish noble

Sir James Scott, Earl of Dalkeith KT was an English nobleman and politician. He was the son of James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth and Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch. He was also the grandson of Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland. On 2 January 1693/94 he married Lady Henrietta Hyde, daughter of Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester and Henrietta Hyde, Countess of Rochester. They had six children:

  1. Francis Scott, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch married (1) Lady Jane Douglas (2) Alice Powell
  2. Anne
  3. Charlotte
  4. Charles
  5. (name unknown)
  6. Henry
James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth English nobleman and soldier

James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch, KG, PC was a Dutch-born English nobleman. Originally called James Crofts or James Fitzroy, he was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and his mistress Lucy Walter.

Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch Scottish peeress

Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch was a wealthy Scottish peer.

Following the death of his father in 1705, he was styled the Earl of Dalkeith, until he succeeded to the dukedom of Buccleuch, 6 February 1732, on the death of his grandmother, who was Duchess of Buccleuch in her own right. At the same time, other titles in the Scottish peerage came his way: Earl of Dalkeith and Baron Scott of Whitchester and Eskdale.

His grandfather, the Duke of Monmouth, was the illegitimate son of Charles II who raised a rebellion upon James II and VII's accession to the English, Scottish and Irish thrones, and was beheaded for it. Monmouth's noble titles were consequently forfeit, but in March 1743 two of those titles were restored to his progeny when the House of Lords passed a bill making Buccleuch the 2nd Earl of Doncaster, as well as 2nd Baron Scott of Tindall, both in the English peerage (conferred 22 March 1743). [3]

Career

In his youth he attended Eton College. Throughout his adult life Buccleuch associated himself with institutions that promoted learning. He was a freemason, member of the Grand Lodge at a period when scientific interests figured prominently in its pursuits. [4] From 24 June 1723 to 24 June 1724 he held the office of Grand Master of Freemasons. [5] He was invested as a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) on 12 March 1724. He was closely associated with the Spalding Gentlemen's Society, a learned society of antiquaries, and he was the first to hold its office of Patron, inaugurated in 1734. [6] On 18 April 1745 he was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of the Civil Law by Oxford University.

Premier Grand Lodge of England masonic organization

The organisation known as the Premier Grand Lodge of England was founded on 24 June 1717 as the 'Grand Lodge of London and Westminster'. Originally concerned with the practice of Freemasonry in London and Westminster, it soon became known as the Grand Lodge of England. Because it was the first Masonic Grand Lodge to be created, convention calls it the Premier Grand Lodge of England in order to distinguish it from the Most Ancient and Honourable Society of Free and Accepted Masons according to the Old Constitutions, more usually referred to as the Ancient Grand Lodge of England, and the Grand Lodge of All England Meeting at York. It existed until 1813, when it united with the Ancient Grand Lodge of England to create the United Grand Lodge of England.

The Spalding Gentlemen's Society is a learned society in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England. It was founded in 1710 by Maurice Johnson, (1688–1755), of Ayscoughfee Hall, and is still active.

His interest at the court of George I was sufficient for him to be invested as a Knight of the Thistle on 2 February 1725. In 1734 he entered the House of Lords when he was elected a Scottish representative peer. In 1740 and 1741, however, he signed protests produced by the opposition, including the November 1741 protest calling for the removal of Sir Robert Walpole from office. [7] It is no surprise that Buccleuch in turn lost the support of the administration at the Scottish peers election of 1741 and consequently failed to be re-elected. He would, nonetheless, return to the House of Lords when he became Earl of Doncaster in 1743.

Personal life

Dalkeith Palace Dalkeith Palace.jpg
Dalkeith Palace
Bowhill House Bowhill House - geograph.org.uk - 982777.jpg
Bowhill House

Buccleuch married, firstly, Lady Jane Douglas, daughter of James Douglas, 2nd Duke of Queensberry, and Mary Boyle, on 5 April 1720 in Earl of Rochester's House, Privy Gardens, Whitehall. They had two sons (Francis and Charles) and three daughters. [8] Lady Jane died in 1729 and is buried at Dalkeith Castle. He married, secondly, Alice Powell, daughter of Joseph Powell, on 4 September 1744 in St. George's Chapel, Mayfair, London, England. Both his sons predeceased him, so he was succeeded by his grandson Henry Scott, 3rd Duke of Buccleuch, the son of Francis. According to his will, he had six other children by Sarah Atkinson. He also appears to have had a son and three daughters by Elizabeth Jenkins.

Jane Scott, Countess of Dalkeith, formerly Lady Jane Douglas, was the first wife of Francis Scott, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch, but died prior to him succeeding in the dukedom.

James Douglas, 2nd Duke of Queensberry 17th/18th-century Scottish duke and politician

James Douglas, 2nd Duke of Queensberry and 1st Duke of Dover was a Scottish nobleman.

Dalkeith Palace historic house in Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland

Dalkeith Palace in Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland, is a historic house and the former seat of the Duke of Buccleuch. The present house was built in 1702 on the site of an earlier castle.

He possessed several estates, some in Scotland and others in England. These included, in Scotland, Dalkeith Palace and Bowhill House (which he bought for his son Charles in 1747), and in England, Spalding in Lincolnshire, Langley in Berkshire and Hall Place at Hurley.

Buccleuch was buried on 26 April 1751 in Eton College Chapel. Lady Louisa Stuart called him "a man of mean understanding and meaner habits", and added that after his first wife's death "he plunged into such low amours, and lived so entirely with the lowest company, that his person was scarcely known to his equals, and his character fell into utter contempt." Though a distant kinswoman by marriage and therefore privy to family remembrances of Buccleuch, Stuart's judgment must be treated with caution; she had no first-hand knowledge of the man, having not yet been born at the time of his death.

Ancestry

Related Research Articles

Duke of Buccleuch Scottish title of nobility

The title Duke of Buccleuch, formerly also spelt Duke of Buccleugh, is a title in the Peerage of Scotland created twice on 20 April 1663, first for James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth and second suo jure for his wife Anne Scott, 4th Countess of Buccleuch. Monmouth, the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II was attainted after his 1685 rebellion, but his wife's title was unaffected and passed on to their descendants, who have successively borne the surnames Scott, Montagu-Scott, Montagu Douglas Scott and Scott again. In 1810, the 3rd Duke of Buccleuch inherited the Dukedom of Queensberry, also in the Peerage of Scotland, thus separating that title from the Marquessate of Queensberry.

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References

  1. Thepeerage.com. Accessed 16 March 2008.
  2. Doyle, James William Edmund. The Official Baronage of England, Showing the Succession, Dignities, and Offices of Every Peer from 1066 to 1885, with Sixteen Hundred Illustrations. (p. 602) London: Longmans, Green, 1886. Googlebooks Accessed 16 March 2008.
  3. Journals of the House of Lords, vol. 26.
  4. Carpenter, Audrey T. John Theophilus Desaguliers: A Natural Philosopher, Engineer and Freemason in Newtonian England. London: Continuum International, 2011.
  5. "Freemasons and the Royal Society: Alphabetical List of Fellows of the Royal Society who were Freemasons." The Library and Museum of Freemasonry. Library and Museum Charitable Trust of the United Grand Lodge of England, 2014. Web. 6 July 2014.
  6. Green, Everard. "The Life, Worth, and Work of Maurice Johnson the Antiquary." Lincolnshire Notes & Queries 2 (1891): 206. Googlebooks. Web. 7 July 2014.
  7. Cobbett, William. The Parliamentary History of England, 1066-1803. Vols. IX and XI. London: Hansard, 1811. Oxford Digital Library. Oxford University Library Services, n.d. Web.
  8. "Buccleuch, Duke of." Cracroft's Peerage. Heraldic, n.d. Web. 7 July 2014.
Masonic offices
Preceded by
The Duke of Wharton
Grand Master of the Premier
Grand Lodge of England

1723–1724
Succeeded by
The Duke of Richmond and Lennox
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
Anne Scott
Duke of Buccleuch
2nd creation
1732–1751
Member of the House of Lords
(1734–1741)
Succeeded by
Henry Scott
Peerage of England
Vacant
Forfeit
Title last held by
James Scott
Earl of Doncaster
1742/1743–1751
Succeeded by
Henry Scott