Francis Seymour, 5th Duke of Somerset

Last updated
His Grace
The Duke of Somerset
Tenure1675–1678
Predecessor John Seymour
Successor Charles Seymour
Titles and styles
BornFrancis Seymour
(1658-01-17)17 January 1658
Died20 April 1678(1678-04-20) (aged 20)
Father Charles Seymour
MotherElizabeth Alington

Francis Seymour, 5th Duke of Somerset (17 January 1658 20 April 1678), known as 3rd Baron Seymour of Trowbridge between 1665 and 1675, was an English peer.

He was the son of Charles Seymour, 2nd Baron Seymour of Trowbridge and Elizabeth Alington (1635–1692). The dukedom came to him because his grandfather, Sir Francis Seymour, was a younger brother of the 2nd Duke of Somerset. He died aged 20, unmarried and childless, having been shot dead by Horatio Botti (a Genoese gentleman), whose wife Seymour was said to have insulted at Lerici. He was succeeded by his brother Charles Seymour. [1]

Charles Seymour, 2nd Baron Seymour of Trowbridge was the son of Francis Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Trowbridge, whom he succeeded in the barony in 1664. Francis had been a younger brother of William Seymour, 2nd Duke of Somerset.

Francis Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Trowbridge English politician

Francis Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Trowbridge, of Marlborough Castle and Savernake Park in Wiltshire, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1621 and 1641 when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Seymour of Trowbridge. He supported the Royalist cause during the English Civil War.

William Seymour, 2nd Duke of Somerset Duke of Somerset

William Seymour, 2nd Duke of Somerset, KG was an English nobleman and Royalist commander in the English Civil War.

Ancestry

Peerage of England
Preceded by
John Seymour
Duke of Somerset
1675–1678
Succeeded by
Charles Seymour
Preceded by
Charles Seymour
Baron Seymour of Trowbridge
1665–1678

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References

  1. Wikisource-logo.svg One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Somerset, Earls and Dukes of". Encyclopædia Britannica . 25 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 385.