Francis Walsingham

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  1. Occasionally, the year of his birth is erroneously given as 1536, but he is named in his father's will of 1 March 1534. [1]
  2. Discourse Touching the Pretended Match Between the Duke of Norfolk and the Queen of Scots: some biographers [22] think he was the writer, but others [23] do not.
  3. The nickname "Moor" perhaps derived from his complexion [60] or his preference for plain black clothes. [61]
  4. Walsingham's spy signed his reports "Henry Fagot". In 1991, Professor John Bossy of the University of York argued in his work Giordano Bruno and the Embassy Affair that Fagot was Bruno. Some biographers [88] accept Bossy's identification, but critics of Bossy [89] think his case is circumstantial.
  5. William Camden wrote, "the Papists accused him as a cunning workman in complotting his business and alluring men into dangers, whilst he diligently searched out their hidden practices against religion, his prince and country." [148]

Citations

  1. Hutchinson, p. 295
  2. Cooper, p. 5; Hutchinson, p. 295
  3. Hasler
  4. 1 2 3 Hutchinson, p. 28
  5. Cooper, p. 7; Hutchinson, p. 26; Wilson, p. 6
  6. Hutchinson, p. 26; Wilson, pp. 7–12
  7. Cooper, p. 12; Hutchinson, p. 296; Wilson, pp. 5–6
  8. Cooper, p. 42; Hutchinson, pp. 30, 296; Wilson, pp. 12–13
  9. "Walsingham, Francis (WLSN548F)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  10. Adams et al.; Cooper, pp. 19–20; Hutchinson, p. 28; Wilson, pp. 17–18
  11. Cooper, pp. 26–28
  12. Cooper, p. 27; Hutchinson, p. 29; Wilson, p. 31
  13. Adams et al.; Cooper, p. 39; Wilson, p. 35
  14. Cooper, p. 42; Wilson, p. 39
  15. Wilson, p. 39
  16. Cooper, p. 45; Hutchinson, p. 30
  17. Adams et al.; Cooper, p. 45; Hutchinson, pp. 30–31
  18. Cooper, p. 46; Hutchinson, p. 31
  19. Hutchinson, p. 31
  20. Hutchinson p. 34; Wilson, pp. 41–49
  21. Hutchinson, pp. 39–42; Wilson, pp. 61–72
  22. e.g. Hutchinson, p. 39 and Conyers Read quoted in Adams et al.
  23. e.g. Wilson, p. 66
  24. Cooper, pp. 57–58; Hutchinson, p. 42; Wilson, pp. 68–69
  25. Hutchinson, pp. 43–44
  26. Cooper, pp. 65–71; Hutchinson, pp. 46–47; Wilson, pp. 75–76
  27. Hutchinson, p. 48
  28. Cooper, p. 112; Hutchinson, p. 48
  29. Wilson, p. 76
  30. Cooper, p. 74
  31. Cooper, pp. 77–79; Hutchinson, pp. 48–50
  32. Hutchinson, pp. 33, 51
  33. Hutchinson, p. 53
  34. Wilson, pp. 83–84
  35. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Adams et al.
  36. Cooper, pp. 87–88
  37. Adams et al.; Wilson, p. 156
  38. Adams et al.; Hutchinson, p. 243; Wilson, p. 127
  39. Adams et al.; Hutchinson, pp. 244, 348
  40. Adams et al.; Hutchinson, pp. 243–244
  41. Wilson, p. 92
  42. Cooper, pp. 87–96; Wilson, pp. 92–96
  43. Cooper, p. 237; Wilson, p. 241
  44. Cooper, pp. 260, 263–265; Hutchinson, p. 246
  45. Cooper, p. 265; Hutchinson, p. 246
  46. Wilson, pp. 144–145
  47. Adams et al.; Cooper, p. 269; Wilson, p. 241
  48. Cooper, pp. 103–104
  49. Cooper, pp. 106–107
  50. Adams et al.; Cooper, p. 107; Wilson, p. 136
  51. Hutchinson, p. 347
  52. Cooper, pp. 115–116
  53. Wilson, pp. 147–148
  54. Cooper, pp. 115–121
  55. Cooper, pp. 117–118; Wilson, pp. 135, 139
  56. Wilson, p. 139
  57. Wilson, pp. 98–99, 127
  58. Wilson, p. 148
  59. "Cecil Papers: July 1581", Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, volume 2: 1572–1582. (1888), pp. 395–404; Cooper, p. 125
  60. 1 2 Hutchinson, p. 244
  61. Cooper, p. 125
  62. Cooper, pp. 173, 307; Hutchinson, p. 224; Parker pp. 193, 221–223
  63. Cooper, p. 174; Hutchinson, p. 225
  64. Wilson, p. 120
  65. Wilson, p. 121
  66. Hutchinson, p. 239; Wilson, p. 169
  67. Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol. 6 (London, 1910), pp. 603, 609; Wilson, p. 170
  68. Thomas Thomson (ed.), James Melville: Memoirs of his own life (Edinburgh, 1827), p. 311.
  69. Wilson, p. 207
  70. Cooper, pp. 238, 255
  71. Cooper, p. 238
  72. Cooper, pp. 253–254
  73. Cooper, p. 257
  74. Cooper, p. 46; Hutchinson, p. 347
  75. Hutchinson, pp. 239–240; Wilson, p. 171
  76. Hutchinson, p. 240
  77. Adams et al.; Hutchinson, pp. 241–242; Wilson, pp. 216–217
  78. Cooper, p. 321; Hutchinson, pp. 172, 242; Wilson, p. 217
  79. Hutchinson, p. 61
  80. Cooper, pp. 190–191; Hutchinson, pp. 72–74
  81. Hutchinson, pp. 71–72
  82. Hutchinson, pp. 51–52; Wilson, p. 154
  83. Cooper, p. 80
  84. Hutchinson, pp. 80–82
  85. Hutchinson, p. 98
  86. Hutchinson, pp. 98–99
  87. Hutchinson, pp. 101–103
  88. e.g. Hutchinson, p. 103 and Wilson, pp. 168–169
  89. e.g. Greengrass, M. (1993). "Giordano Bruno and the Embassy Affair by John Bossy". Journal of Ecclesiastical History. 44 (4): 756. doi:10.1017/S0022046900013981. S2CID   162359864 ; Gleason, Elizabeth G. (1993). "Giordano Bruno and the Embassy Affair by John Bossy". Journal of Modern History. 65 (4): 816–818. doi:10.1086/244728. JSTOR   2124544.
  90. Hutchinson, p. 104
  91. Hutchinson, pp. 73–74, 105; Wilson, pp. 173–175
  92. Hutchinson, p. 106; Wilson, p. 175
  93. Cooper, pp. 158–161; Hutchinson, pp. 105–106
  94. Hutchinson, pp. 103–104; Wilson, pp. 176–177
  95. Adams et al.; Cooper, p. 291
  96. Cooper, p. 194; Hutchinson, pp. 107, 116; Wilson, pp. 179–180
  97. Hutchinson, pp. 117–118
  98. Hutchinson, p. 118
  99. Cooper, p. 207; Fraser, p. 479; Hutchinson, p. 120
  100. Hutchinson, pp. 118–119
  101. Adams et al.; Cooper, pp. 209–211; Fraser, pp. 482–483; Hutchinson, p. 121; Wilson, p. 210
  102. Adams et al.; Cooper, pp. 216–217; Fraser, p. 487; Hutchinson, pp. 127–129; Wilson, pp. 210–211
  103. Adams et al.; Cooper, pp. 217–218; Fraser, p. 488; Hutchinson, pp. 130–133; Wilson, p. 211
  104. Cooper, pp. 219–221; Hutchinson, pp. 144–145
  105. Fraser, pp. 509–517; Hutchinson, pp. 153–163
  106. Hutchinson, p. 164
  107. Fraser, p. 513; Hutchinson, p. 165
  108. Hutchinson, p. 169
  109. Hutchinson, p. 172
  110. Hutchinson, p. 181
  111. Fraser, p. 529; Hutchinson, p. 182
  112. Hutchinson, pp. 183–194; Wilson, pp. 221–222
  113. Hutchinson, pp. 196–202; Wilson, pp. 223–228
  114. Hutchinson, pp. 201, 328; Wilson, p. 226
  115. Hutchinson, pp. 205–208, 215, 217; Wilson, pp. 231–233
  116. Cooper, p. 297; Hutchinson, pp. 217–218; Wilson, pp. 233–234
  117. Cooper, pp. 301–303
  118. Cooper, pp. 176–177; Hutchinson, pp. 203–205
  119. Hutchinson, pp. 210–212
  120. Hutchinson, pp. 231–233
  121. Wilson, p. 237
  122. Quoted in Cooper, p. 317
  123. 1 2 Cooper, p. 175; Hutchinson, p. 89
  124. Wilson, pp. 94, 100–101, 142
  125. Hutchinson, pp. 84–87; Wilson, p. 142
  126. Cooper, p. 179; Hutchinson, p. 111
  127. Cooper, p. 179
  128. Hutchinson, p. 248
  129. Hutchinson, pp. 248–251
  130. Hutchinson, p. 250
  131. Adams et al.; Wilson, p. 128
  132. Cooper, pp. 71, 107; Hutchinson, p. 251
  133. Cooper, p. 71
  134. Adams et al.; Hutchinson, p. 253; Wilson, p. 239
  135. Hutchinson, p. 254
  136. Adams et al.; Cooper, p. 324; Hutchinson, p. 254
  137. 1 2 Hutchinson, p. 253
  138. 1 2 Hutchinson, p. 257
  139. Cooper, p. 310; Hutchinson, pp. 47–48, 101, 264; Wilson, pp. 101, 188
  140. Hutchinson, pp. 61, 348
  141. Cooper, p. 310
  142. Hutchinson, pp. 265–266
  143. Thomas Watson quoted in Hutchinson, p. 261
  144. Wilson, p. 242
  145. William F. Friedman; Elizabeth S. Friedman (2011). The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined: An Analysis of Cryptographic Systems Used as Evidence that Some Author Other Than William Shakespeare Wrote the Plays Commonly Attributed to Him. Cambridge University Press. p. 96. ISBN   978-0-521-14139-0.
  146. Thomas Watson. "Thomas Watson: An Eglogue upon the Death of Sir Francis Walsingham". Spenserians.cath.vt.edu. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  147. Hutchinson, p. 63
  148. Quoted in Hutchinson, p. 260
  149. Cooper, pp. 130–131
  150. Hutchinson, pp. 261–264
  151. Adams et al.; Cooper, p. 44
  152. Cooper, p. 189; Wilson, p. 93
  153. Rozett, pp. 72–74
  154. Adams et al.; Spielvogel, p. 409
  155. Spielvogel, p. 409
  156. Latham, pp. 203, 240

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References

Further reading

Sir
Francis Walsingham
Sir Francis Walsingham by John De Critz the Elder.jpg
Portrait c.1585, attributed to John de Critz
Secretary of State
In office
1573–1590
Political offices
Preceded by English Ambassador to France
1570–1573
Succeeded by
Preceded by Secretary of State
1573–1590
With: Sir Thomas Smith 1573–1576
Thomas Wilson 1577–1581
William Davison 1586–1587
Succeeded byas acting secretary
Preceded by Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1587–1590
Succeeded by
Honorary titles
Preceded by Custos rotulorum of Hampshire
1577–1590
Succeeded by
Preceded by Chancellor of the Order of the Garter
1578–1587
Succeeded by