Francisco Marroquín

Last updated
Most Reverend

Francisco Marroquín Hurtado
Bishop of Santiago de Guatemala
Francisco Marroquin Husrtado.jpg
Francisco Marroquín on a Guatemalan stamp
Church Catholic Church
Diocese Diocese of Santiago de Guatemala
In office1534–1563
PredecessorNone
Successor Bernardino de Villalpando
Orders
Consecration8 April 1537
by  Juan de Zumárraga
Personal details
Born1478
Santander, Spain
Died19 April 1563 (84-85 years old)
Guatemala City, Guatemala
NationalitySpanish

Francisco Marroquín (1499 – April 18, 1563) was the first bishop of Guatemala, [1] [2] translator of Central American languages and provisional Governor of Guatemala.

Guatemala Republic in Central America

Guatemala, officially the Republic of Guatemala, is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, Belize and the Caribbean to the northeast, Honduras to the east, El Salvador to the southeast and the Pacific Ocean to the south. With an estimated population of around 16.6 million, it is the most populated country in Central America. Guatemala is a representative democracy; its capital and largest city is Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, also known as Guatemala City.

Contents

Biography

Marroquín was born near Santander, Spain. He studied philosophy and theology in Osuna. [3] After entering the priesthood, Marroquín became a professor at the University of Osuna where he met Bishop García de Loaisa, an adviser to Emperor Charles V. [4] Marroquín became a priest in the Spanish royal court. [3] In 1528 the conquistador Pedro de Alvarado, Governor of Guatemala, was in Spain and met Marroquín; he convinced the priest to accompany him back to Guatemala. [5]

Spain Kingdom in Southwest Europe

Spain, officially the Kingdom of Spain, is a European country located in Southwestern Europe with some pockets of Spanish territory across the Strait of Gibraltar and the Atlantic Ocean. Its continental European territory is situated on the Iberian Peninsula. Its territory also includes two archipelagoes: the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa, and the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean Sea. The African enclaves of Ceuta, Melilla, and Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera make Spain the only European country to have a physical border with an African country (Morocco). Several small islands in the Alboran Sea are also part of Spanish territory. The country's mainland is bordered to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea except for a small land boundary with Gibraltar; to the north and northeast by France, Andorra, and the Bay of Biscay; and to the west and northwest by Portugal and the Atlantic Ocean.

Philosophy The rational investigation of the truths and principles of being, knowledge, or conduct.

Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental questions about existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. Such questions are often posed as problems to be studied or resolved. The term was probably coined by Pythagoras. Philosophical methods include questioning, critical discussion, rational argument, and systematic presentation. Classic philosophical questions include: Is it possible to know anything and to prove it? What is most real? Philosophers also pose more practical and concrete questions such as: Is there a best way to live? Is it better to be just or unjust? Do humans have free will?

Theology is the systematic study of the nature of the divine and, more broadly, of religious belief. It is taught as an academic discipline, typically in universities and seminaries. It occupies itself with the unique content of analyzing the supernatural, but also deals with religious epistemology, asks and seeks to answer the question of revelation. Revelation pertains to the acceptance of God, gods, or deities, as not only transcendent or above the natural world, but also willing and able to interact with the natural world and, in particular, to reveal themselves to humankind. While theology has turned into a secular field, religious adherents still consider theology to be a discipline that helps them live and understand concepts such as life and love and that helps them lead lives of obedience to the deities they follow or worship.

After first arriving in Mexico, he traveled onwards to Guatemala with Alvarado, in May 1528. On April 11, 1530, he was appointed parish priest of Guatemala. [6] On December 18, 1534, he was appointed during the papacy of Pope Paul III as Bishop of Santiago de Guatemala [7] and later provisional governor of Guatemala. [6] On April 8, 1537, he was consecrated bishop by Juan de Zumárraga, Archbishop of Mexico, with Juan Lopez de Zárate, Bishop of Antequera, Oaxaca serving as co-consecrator. [7] While bishop, he was the principal consecrator of Tomás Casillas, Bishop of Chiapas (1552) and principal co-consecrator of Antonio de Valdivieso, Bishop of Nicaragua (1544). [7]

Pope Paul III Pope

Pope Paul III, born Alessandro Farnese, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 13 October 1534 to his death in 1549.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santiago de Guatemala archdiocese

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santiago de Guatemala is a Latin Metropolitan archdiocese in Guatemala.

Juan de Zumárraga Archbishop of Mexico

Don Juan de Zumárraga y Arrazola was a Spanish Basque Franciscan prelate and first bishop of Mexico. He wrote Doctrina breve, the first book published in the Western hemisphere, printed in Mexico City in 1539.

Marroquín founded the School of Saint Thomas in 1559 (now the University of San Carlos of Guatemala) as part of his efforts to educate the native people. He became a scholar of the K'iche' language and published the first catechism in that language. [8]

Catechism A summary or exposition of doctrine

A catechism is a summary or exposition of doctrine and serves as a learning introduction to the Sacraments traditionally used in catechesis, or Christian religious teaching of children and adult converts. Catechisms are doctrinal manuals – often in the form of questions followed by answers to be memorised – a format that has been used in non-religious or secular contexts as well. According to Norman DeWitt, the early Christians appropriated this practice from the Epicureans, a school whose founder Epicurus had instructed to keep summaries of the teachings for easy learning. The term catechumen refers to the designated recipient of the catechetical work or instruction. In the Catholic Church, catechumens are those who are preparing to receive the Sacrament of Baptism. Traditionally, they would be placed separately during Holy Mass from those who had been baptized, and would be dismissed from the liturgical assembly before the Profession of Faith (Creed) and General Intercessions.

The Universidad Francisco Marroquín in Guatemala City is named for him.

Universidad Francisco Marroquín university in Guatemala

Francisco Marroquín University, also known by the abbreviation UFM, is a private, secular university in Guatemala City, Guatemala. It describes its mission as "to teach and disseminate the ethical, legal, and overall economic principles of a society of free and responsible persons."

Guatemala City Capital City in Guatemala, Guatemala

Guatemala City, locally known as Guatemala or Guate, officially Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, is the capital and largest city of Guatemala, and the most populous city in Central America. The city is located in the south-central part of the country, nestled in a mountain valley called Valle de la Ermita. It is estimated that its population is about 1 million. Guatemala City is also the capital of the Municipality of Guatemala and of the Guatemala Department.

Notes

  1. Recinos 1952, 1986, p. 127. n. 75.
  2. Eubel, Konrad (1923). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. III (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. p. 207.(in Latin)
  3. 1 2 Recinos 1952, 1986, p. 127.
  4. Pérez de Antón, Francisco (January 13, 1992). "In Praise of Francisco Marroquín" (PDF). Universidad Francisco Marroquín, Guatemala City.
  5. Recinos 1952, 1986, pp. 126–127.
  6. 1 2 "Francisco Marroquín (1499–1563)" (PDF). Religion & Liberty. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty. 12 (5). September and October 2002. Archived from the original (pdf) on June 27, 2009. Retrieved 2008-10-14.Check date values in: |date= (help)
  7. 1 2 3 Cheney, David M. "Bishop Francisco Marroquín Hurtado". Catholic-Hierarchy.org . Retrieved June 16, 2018. [self-published]
  8. "Francisco Marroquin (1478–1563)" (Spanish). Genesis Megaprogramas, SA. Retrieved 2008-10-14.

Catholic-Hierarchy.org is an online database of bishops and dioceses of the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Catholic Churches. The website is not officially sanctioned by the Church. It is run as a private project by David M. Cheney in Kansas City.

Adrián Recinos Guatemalan scholar and diplomat

Adrián Recinos (1886–1962) was a Guatemalan historian, essayist, Mayanist scholar and translator, and diplomat. Recinos was a great student of national history, mainly of the Maya civilization and the ancient history of the K'iche' and Kaqchikel people.

OCLC global library cooperative

OCLC, Inc., d/b/a OCLC is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs". It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center, then became the Online Computer Library Center as it expanded. OCLC and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world. OCLC is funded mainly by the fees that libraries have to pay for its services. OCLC also maintains the Dewey Decimal Classification system.


Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
None
Bishop of Santiago de Guatemala
1534-1563
Succeeded by
Bernardino de Villalpando

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