Frank Broyles

Last updated
Frank Broyles
Coach Broyles.jpg
Coach Broyles in 2007
Biographical details
Born(1924-12-26)December 26, 1924
Decatur, Georgia
DiedAugust 14, 2017(2017-08-14) (aged 92)
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Playing career
1943–1944, 1946 Georgia Tech
Position(s) Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1950 Florida (assistant)
1951–1956 Georgia Tech (OC)
1957 Missouri
1958–1976 Arkansas
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1974–2007 Arkansas
Head coaching record
Overall149–62–6
Bowls4–6
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 National (1964)
7 SWC (1959–1961, 1964–1965, 1968, 1975)
Awards
AFCA Coach of the Year (1964)
Sporting News College Football COY (1964)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1983 (profile)

John Franklin Broyles (December 26, 1924 – August 14, 2017) was an American football player and coach, athletics administrator, and broadcaster. He served as the head football coach at the University of Missouri in 1957 and at the University of Arkansas from 1958 to 1976. Broyles also was Arkansas' athletic director from 1974 until his retirement on December 31, 2007. [1]

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

University of Missouri American public state university

The University of Missouri is a public, land-grant research university in Columbia, Missouri. It was founded in 1839 as the first public institution of higher education west of the Mississippi River. The state's largest university, it enrolled 30,870 students in 2017 and offered over 300 degree programs in 21 academic divisions. It is the flagship campus of the University of Missouri System, which also has campuses in Kansas City, Rolla, and St. Louis. There are more than 300,000 MU alumni living worldwide with over one half residing in Missouri.

University of Arkansas Public research university in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA

The University of Arkansas is a public land-grant, research university in Fayetteville, Arkansas. It is the flagship campus of the University of Arkansas System and the largest, best-known university in the state. Founded as Arkansas Industrial University in 1871, its present name was adopted in 1899 and classes were first held on January 22, 1872. It is noted for its strong architecture, agriculture, business, communication disorders, creative writing, history, law, and Middle Eastern studies programs.

Contents

As a head football coach, Broyles compiled a record of 149–62–6. His mark of 144–58–5 in 19 seasons is the most wins and the most games of any head coach in Arkansas Razorbacks football history. With Arkansas, Broyles won seven Southwest Conference titles and his 1964 team was named a national champion by a number of selectors including the Football Writers Association of America. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983.

Arkansas Razorbacks football

The Arkansas Razorbacks football program represents the University of Arkansas, located in Fayetteville, Arkansas, in the sport of American football. The Razorbacks compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The program has 1 claimed national championship awarded by the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) and Helms Athletic Foundation (HAF) in 1964, 1 unclaimed national championship awarded by the Foundation for the Analysis of Competitions and Tournaments (FACT) in 1977, 13 conference championships, 45 All-Americans, and an all-time record of 701–475–40. The Razorbacks are the 23rd-ranked team in college football history by total number of wins. Home games are played at locations on or near the two largest campuses of the University of Arkansas System: Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, and War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock.

Southwest Conference former NCAA athletic conference

The Southwest Conference (SWC) was an NCAA Division I college athletic conference in the United States that existed from 1914 to 1996. Composed primarily of schools from Texas, at various times the conference included schools from Oklahoma and Arkansas as well.

The 1964 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas in the Southwest Conference (SWC) during the 1964 college football season. In their seventh year under head coach Frank Broyles, the Razorbacks compiled an undefeated 11–0 record, won the SWC championship, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 231 to 64. The Razorbacks were ranked #2 in both the final AP Poll and the final UPI Coaches Poll. They were selected as national champion by Billingsley, Football Research, Football Writers Association of America, Helms, National Championship Foundation, Poling System, Sagarin, and Sagarin (ELO-Chess).

Playing career

After his graduation from Decatur Boys High School, Broyles studied at Georgia Tech, where he was a quarterback from 1944 to 1946. He graduated from Georgia Tech with a degree in Industrial Management. He led the Georgia Tech football team to four bowl appearances. He was named Southeastern Conference Player of the Year in 1944. Until Michigan quarterback Tom Brady broke his record in 2000, Broyles held the Orange Bowl record for most passing yards in a game and is a member of the Orange Bowl, Gator Bowl, and Cotton Bowl Classic Halls of Fame and the Georgia Tech Hall of Fame. [2] Broyles was later drafted by the Chicago Bears in the third round of the 1946 NFL Draft. [3]

Decatur High School (Georgia)

Decatur High School (DHS) is a high school in Decatur, Georgia, United States. It is the sole high school in the Decatur City School District and was established in 1912.

Georgia Institute of Technology public research university in Atlanta, Georgia, United States

The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly referred to as Georgia Tech, is a public research university and institute of technology in Atlanta, Georgia. It is part of the University System of Georgia and has satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia; Metz, France; Athlone, Ireland; Shenzhen, China; and Singapore.

Quarterback position in gridiron football

A quarterback, colloquially known as the "signal caller", is a position in American and Canadian football. Quarterbacks are members of the offensive team and line up directly behind the offensive line. In modern American football, the quarterback is usually considered the leader of the offensive team, and is often responsible for calling the play in the huddle. The quarterback also touches the ball on almost every offensive play, and is the offensive player that almost always throws forward passes.

Coaching career

Broyles entered coaching in 1947 as an assistant coach under head coach Bob Woodruff at Baylor University. In 1950, Broyles followed Woodruff when the latter took the head coach position at the University of Florida. In 1951, he left Florida and returned to Georgia Tech as an offensive coordinator under coach Bobby Dodd. Broyles sought the head coaching position at Northwestern University in 1954, [4] and ultimately left Georgia Tech in 1957 when he was offered the position of head coach at the University of Missouri. Broyles stayed at Missouri only one season when he was offered the head coaching job at Arkansas. During his nineteen years as head coach there, he was offered other major coaching and leadership positions, but remained at Arkansas.

Bob Woodruff (American football) American college football player, college football coach, college athletic director

George Robert Woodruff was an American college football player, coach, and sports administrator. Woodruff was a native of Georgia and an alumnus of the University of Tennessee, where he played college football. He was best known as the head coach of the Baylor University and University of Florida football teams, and later, as the athletic director at the University of Tennessee.

Baylor University private university in Waco, Texas, United States

Baylor University (BU) is a private Christian university in Waco, Texas. Chartered in 1845 by the last Congress of the Republic of Texas, it is one of the oldest continuously operating universities in Texas and one of the first educational institutions west of the Mississippi River in the United States. Located on the banks of the Brazos River next to I-35, between the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex and Austin, the university's 1,000-acre campus is the largest Baptist university campus in the world. Baylor University's athletic teams, known as the Bears, participate in 19 intercollegiate sports. The university is a member of the Big 12 Conference in the NCAA Division I. It is affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas.

University of Florida Public research university in Gainesville, Florida, United States

The University of Florida is an American public land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant research university in Gainesville, Florida. It is a senior member of the State University System of Florida. The university traces its origins to 1853 and has operated continuously on its Gainesville campus since September 1906.

During his tenure at Arkansas, Broyles coached the Razorbacks to seven Southwest Conference championships, and two Cotton Bowl Classic wins. His 1964 team was proclaimed national champions by the Football Writers Association of America, as well as the Helms Foundation, and to date is the last Razorback team to go undefeated and untied in a season. If the wire service polls had not given out their national championships prior to the bowl games during that era of college football, Arkansas positively would have won both the AP and the UPI national titles as well, since Alabama (winner of both) lost to Texas (a team Arkansas beat in Austin in 1964) in the Orange Bowl. He still holds the record for most wins by a head coach in the history of Arkansas football, with 144. During the 1960s and 1970s, one of college football's most intense rivalries was between Broyles' Razorbacks and the University of Texas Longhorns under legendary coach Darrell Royal.

Cotton Bowl Classic American college football tournament

The Cotton Bowl Classic, also simply known as the Cotton Bowl, is an American college football bowl game that has been held annually in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex since January 1, 1937. The game was originally played at its namesake stadium in Dallas before moving to AT&T Stadium in nearby Arlington in 2010. Since 2014, the game has been sponsored by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company and officially known as the Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic. It has been previously sponsored by Southwestern Bell Corporation/SBC Communications/AT&T (1997–2014) and Mobil (1989–1995)

Football Writers Association of America

The Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) is one of the organizations whose College Football All-America Team is recognized by the NCAA. The organization also selects the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year, the Bronko Nagurski Trophy winner, the Outland Trophy winner, the Grantland Rice Trophy winner, a freshman All-America team, and weekly defensive player of the week, as well as developing scholarship programs and surveys for better working conditions. Since 1954, the association has awarded the Grantland Rice Trophy to the college football team they choose to be the National Champion.

University of Texas at Austin public research university in Austin, Texas, United States

The University of Texas at Austin is a public research university in Austin, Texas. It was founded in 1883 and is the flagship institution of the University of Texas System. The University of Texas was inducted into the Association of American Universities in 1929, becoming only the third university in the American South to be elected. The institution has the nation's eighth-largest single-campus enrollment, with over 50,000 undergraduate and graduate students and over 24,000 faculty and staff.

Among Broyles's most memorable victories while coaching the Razorbacks, was the 14-13 win over #1 Texas in 1964 in Austin, the 1965 Cotton Bowl victory over Nebraska to complete an undefeated season, the 1969 Sugar Bowl victory over Georgia, beating #2 Texas A&M in the 1975 season finale to win a share of the SWC championship, and then beating Georgia in the 1976 Cotton Bowl.

The 1969 Sugar Bowl featured the fourth-ranked Georgia Bulldogs, and the ninth-ranked Arkansas Razorbacks. Chuck Dicus was named Sugar Bowl MVP after catching 12 passes.

The two most painful losses in his tenure at Arkansas, included the 1966 Cotton Bowl loss to LSU that snapped Arkansas' 22 game winning streak, and, most famously, the 1969 Game of the Century that saw #1 Texas come from behind to beat #2 Arkansas, 15-14.

Broadcasting career

After his retirement from coaching, but concurrent with the early part of his tenure as men's athletic director at Arkansas, Broyles served as the primary color commentator for ABC Sports television coverage of college football, normally alongside top play-by-play man Keith Jackson. Broyles' time as a broadcaster at ABC lasted from 1977 to 1985. Broyles was often assigned games involving Southeastern Conference or Southwest Conference teams, but if the primary game of a particular week involved the Razorbacks, Broyles was paired with another play-by-play man, many times Al Michaels or Chris Schenkel, while Jackson called the game with another color commentator, many times Ara Parseghian. Broyles' commentary was normally focused on play calling and coaching strategy, and while paired with Jackson, resulted in an all-Georgian booth (Jackson is a native of Roopville).

As a member of Augusta National Golf Club, Broyles from 1972 to 1977 co-hosted (with tournament chairmen Clifford Roberts and William Lane) the Green jacket presentation ceremony at the end of the Masters Tournament from Butler Cabin televised on CBS.

Athletic director

In 1974 Broyles was appointed Men's Athletic Director of the University of Arkansas. (Arkansas had a completely separate women's athletics department from 1971 until the men's and women's programs were merged in 2008.) Broyles continued as head football coach for three years. Since stepping down as head coach, the University of Arkansas men's athletic programs, under his leadership as athletic director, have won 43 national championships. The Razorbacks have won 57 Southwest Conference championships and 47 Southeastern Conference championships while he has been men's athletic director. As athletic Director of Arkansas Broyles cancelled the men's swimming and diving program to satisfy new regulations from the SEC of having two more women's sports than men's sports.

In 1976, Broyles was initiated into the University of Arkansas' chapter of Sigma Pi fraternity. [5]

On February 17, 2007, Broyles announced his plans to retire as Men's Athletic Director, effective December 31, 2007, ending his half-century association with Arkansas. [1]

Criticism

As Athletic Director, Broyles was known for being very hands-on with the football program. Indeed, at least one head coach, Ken Hatfield, left the school because he couldn't abide Broyles' meddling. After Hatfield left, at least one booster doubted whether the Razorbacks would ever attract a top-tier head coach as long as Broyles was athletic director. [6]

In 2000, following an expansion of Razorback Stadium, Broyles announced that one home game would move from War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock to Fayetteville, and that, in the near future, all home games might be played on campus. This move, known in Arkansas as the "Great Stadium Debate," drew heavy fire from politicians in Little Rock, as well as businessmen and Razorback boosters Warren Stephens (Stephens, Inc.) and Joe Ford (CEO of Alltel). Broyles held meetings in Little Rock to try to persuade his case, and the University Board of Trustees even took student responses to the Great Stadium Debate on the Fayetteville campus. In the end, a long term agreement was reached to keep 2-3 games in Little Rock, while the rest would be played in Fayetteville. [7]

Broyles' relationship with Ted Herrod, a wealthy booster in Dallas, came under fire after Herrod was accused of overcompensating Razorback athletes who worked part-time jobs at his trucking company. A lengthy NCAA investigation followed, and the University was placed on probation by the NCAA. [8]

Legacy

Broyles (center) with Reps. Vic Snyder (left) and Mike Ross (right) Frank Broyles, Vic Snyder and Mike Ross.jpg
Broyles (center) with Reps. Vic Snyder (left) and Mike Ross (right)

Over thirty of his former players have also become college or professional football coaches. Broyles is known for producing high quality coaches and the prestigious Broyles Award, the annual award for best assistant coach, is named after him. Barry Switzer, Johnny Majors, Joe Gibbs, Hayden Fry, and Jimmy Johnson all served under Broyles and have combined to win five collegiate national championships and six Super Bowls. Broyles' assistants have won more than 40 conference titles. Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones played on Broyles' 1964 Championship team.

Broyles' tenure as men's athletic director has seen the construction of world-class facilities for basketball, football, track and field (indoor and outdoor), golf, and baseball at Arkansas. Broyles was selected as the 20th century's most influential Arkansas sports figure. Broyles will be remembered as the only SEC athletic director that had to drop a men's sport bringing into questions the health of the athletic department under his leadership.

Broyles was known as a fierce competitor both as a head coach and athletic director. Broyles led Arkansas out of the Southwest Conference and into the Southeastern Conference.

In 1983 Broyles was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, and in 1996, the Broyles Award was established to recognize the top assistant coaches in college football. He was a member of the Augusta National Golf Club. [9]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
Missouri Tigers (Big Seven Conference)(1957)
1957 Missouri 5–4–13–3T–3rd
Missouri:5–4–13–3
Arkansas Razorbacks (Southwest Conference)(1958–1976)
1958 Arkansas 4–62–4T–5th
1959 Arkansas 9–25–1T–1stW Gator 99
1960 Arkansas 8–36–11stL Cotton 77
1961 Arkansas 8–36–11stL Sugar 89
1962 Arkansas 9–26–12ndL Sugar 66
1963 Arkansas 5–53–44th
1964 Arkansas 11–07–01stW Cotton 22
1965 Arkansas 10–17–01stL Cotton 23
1966 Arkansas 8–25–2T–2nd13
1967 Arkansas 4–5–13–3–15th
1968 Arkansas 10–16–1T–1stW Sugar 96
1969 Arkansas 9–26–12ndL Sugar 37
1970 Arkansas 9–26–12nd1211
1971 Arkansas 8–3–15–1–12ndL Liberty 2016
1972 Arkansas 6–53–4T–4th
1973 Arkansas 5–5–13–3–1T–4th
1974 Arkansas 6–4–13–3–1T–4th
1975 Arkansas 10–26–1T–1stW Cotton 67
1976 Arkansas 5–5–13–4–16th
Arkansas:144–58–591–35–5
Total:149–62–6
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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The 1960 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas in the Southwest Conference (SWC) during the 1960 NCAA University Division football season. In their third year under head coach Frank Broyles, the Razorbacks compiled an 8–3 record, won the SWC championship, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 185 to 87. The Razorbacks' only losses during the regular season came against Baylor by a 28–14 score and to Mississippi by a 10–7 score. The team was ranked #7 in both the final AP Poll and the final UPI Coaches Poll and went on to lose to Duke in the 1960 Cotton Bowl Classic by a 23–14 score.

The 1955 Cotton Bowl Classic was a post-season college football bowl game between the Southwest Conference champion Arkansas Razorbacks and the champions of the SEC, the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. Georgia Tech defeated Arkansas, 14-6, in front of 75,550 spectators. Arkansas would get their revenge in the 1960 Gator Bowl, a 14-7 Hog win.

The 1960 Gator Bowl was a college football bowl game between the Southwest Conference (SWC) co-champion Arkansas Razorbacks and the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets representing the Southeastern Conference (SEC). Arkansas defeated Georgia Tech, 14–7, in front of 45,104 spectators. There were two players named Most Valuable Player: Jim Mooty of Arkansas and Maxie Baughan of Georgia Tech.

The 1991 Independence Bowl was a post-season college football bowl game between the Arkansas Razorbacks and the Georgia Bulldogs. Georgia defeated Arkansas, 24–15.

References

  1. 1 2 "Arkansas AD Frank Broyles will resign at end of year". USA Today. February 18, 2007. Retrieved March 22, 2007.
  2. "Frank Broyles". Hog Nation. Hog Nation. Archived from the original on October 29, 2012. Retrieved February 15, 2013.
  3. Mayer, Larry (April 25, 2013). "These Bears draft picks gained fame in other areas". Chicago Bears . Retrieved April 25, 2013.
  4. "Keeping the Faith". Northwestern. Retrieved July 20, 2007.
  5. "Alumni in the News" (PDF). The Emerald of Sigma Pi. Vol. 64 no. 1. Spring 1976. p. 5.
  6. Murphy, Austin. Not exactly Hog Heaven. Sports Illustrated , September 21, 1992.
  7. "Were We Robbed of the Razorbacks?:UA announces that more games will be played in Fayetteville". February 15, 2000.
  8. "Arkansas Responds To Inquiries". The New York Times. December 24, 2002.
  9. Augusta National Golf Club members list, USA Today