Frank Eyton

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Frank Eyton (30 August 1894 – 11 November 1962) was an English popular music lyricist best known for co-writing the lyrics of Johnny Green's "Body and Soul" (1930) with Edward Heyman and Robert Sour. [1]

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Popular music is music with wide appeal that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training. It stands in contrast to both art music and traditional or "folk" music. Art music was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings. Traditional music forms such as early blues songs or hymns were passed along orally, or to smaller, local audiences.

A lyricist or lyrist is a person who writes lyrics—words for songs—as opposed to a composer, who writes the song's melody.

Most of Eyton's work was collaborations with Noel Gay and Billy Mayerl in London-based musical theatre. With Mayerl as composer, Eyton co-wrote with Desmond Carter the lyrics for the celebrated sequence "Side by Side" from Over She Goes (filmed 1938). His most successful play was the 1948 musical farce, Bob's Your Uncle, written in collaboration with Gay. [2]

Noel Gay British composer

Noel Gay was born Reginald Moxon Armitage. He also used the name Stanley Hill professionally. He was a successful British composer of popular music of the 1930s and 1940s whose output comprised 45 songs as well as the music for 28 films and 26 London shows. Sheridan Morley has commented that he was "the closest Britain ever came to a local Irving Berlin".

William Joseph Mayerl was an English pianist and composer who built a career in music hall and musical theatre and became an acknowledged master of light music. Best known for his syncopated novelty piano solos, he wrote over 300 piano pieces, many of which were named after flowers and trees, including his best-known composition, Marigold (1927). He also ran the successful School of Syncopation for whose members he published hundreds of his own arrangements of popular songs.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of both England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

With Gay, Eyton wrote the popular song "All Over The Place" for the 1940 film Sailors Three and the songs for the 1942 film Let the People Sing. He was also one of the soundtrack writers of Body and Soul , a successful boxing film from 1947. [2]

Sailors Three is a 1940 British war comedy film directed by Walter Forde and starring Tommy Trinder, Claude Hulbert and Carla Lehmann. This was cockney music hall comedian Trinder's debut for Ealing, the studio with which he was to become most closely associated. It concerns three British sailors who accidentally find themselves aboard a German ship during the Second World War.

<i>Body and Soul</i> (1947 film) 1947 film noir directed by Robert Rossen

Body and Soul is a 1947 American film noir sports drama directed by Robert Rossen, and features John Garfield, Lilli Palmer, Hazel Brooks, Anne Revere and William Conrad. The film, written by Abraham Polonsky with cinematography by James Wong Howe, is considered by some to be high among the best films about boxing, it's also a cautionary tale about the lure of money—and how it can derail even a strong common man in his pursuit of success.

Notes

  1. Frank Eyton biography at Allmusic - retrieved on 18 May 2009
  2. 1 2 Frank Eyton at jazzbiographies.com - retrieved on 18 May 2009
Internet Broadway Database online database of Broadway theatre productions and their personnel

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