Frank Frost Abbott

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Frank Frost Abbott (March 27, 1860 July 23, 1924) was an American classical scholar.

Contents

Life

Born in Redding, Connecticut, he taught at the University of Chicago, [1] then moved to Princeton University in 1907. He died in Montreux, Switzerland.

Works

He also translated Alberico Gentili's Hispanicae Advocationis Libri Dvo ("Two Books of Advocacy in the Service of Spain").

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References

  1. Leonard, John William; Marquis, Albert Nelson, eds. (1908), Who's who in America, 5, Chicago: Marquis Who's Who, Incorporated, p. 4.