Frank Hockly

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Frank Hockly in 1922 Frank Franklin Hockly, 1922.jpg
Frank Hockly in 1922

Frank Franklin Hockly (1865 – 7 October 1936) was a Reform Party Member of Parliament in New Zealand.

Contents

Biography

New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1919 1922 20th Rotorua Reform
1922 1925 21st Rotorua Reform
1925 1928 22nd Rotorua Reform

Born in Orrell near Litherland, Lancashire, England, in 1865, Hockly emigrated to New Zealand in 1884. [1]

Arthur Remington of the Liberal Party had held the Rangitikei electorate, but he died on 17 August 1909. [2] The resulting 1909 by-election was contested by five candidates, with Hockly as one of the opposition candidates leading Robert William Smith for the government by 1548 votes to 1055. [3] [4] At the time, the Second Ballot Act 1908 applied and since Hockly had not achieved an absolute majority, a second ballot between the two leading contenders was required. [5] In the second contest, Smith had a majority of 400 votes over Hockly and was thus declared elected. [6]

In the 1911 election, three candidates contested the new Waimarino electorate: Smith for the Liberal government, Hockly as the opposition candidate, and Joseph Ivess as an Independent Liberal. [7] Smith and Hockly progressed to the second ballot, [8] which was won by Smith with a 480 votes majority. [9] [10]

Hockly was elected to the Rotorua electorate in the 1919 general election, but was defeated in 1928. [11] He was Chairman of Committees from 1926 to 1928. [12]

In 1935, he was awarded the King George V Silver Jubilee Medal. [13] He died in Auckland in 1936 [1] and was buried in Waikumete Cemetery. [14]

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Ex-M.P.'s death". New Zealand Herald. 8 October 1936. p. 13. Retrieved 11 November 2014.
  2. Wilson 1985, p. 229.
  3. "Final Returns". Taranaki Herald . LV (14012). 17 September 1909. p. 3. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  4. "The Rangitikei Seat". Otago Daily Times (14624). 9 September 1909. p. 7. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  5. Foster 1966.
  6. "Rangitikei Seat". The Evening Post . LXXVIII (74). 24 September 1909. p. 3. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  7. "Political Notes". Manawatu Standard. XLI (9632). 5 October 1911. p. 5. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  8. "Wellington Province". Poverty Bay Herald. XXXVIII (12632). 8 December 1911. p. 5. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  9. "The General Election, 1911". National Library. 1912. p. 3. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  10. Wilson 1985, p. 235.
  11. Wilson 1985, p. 205.
  12. Wilson 1985, p. 252.
  13. "Official jubilee medals". Evening Post. 6 May 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
  14. "Cemetery search details". Auckland Council. Retrieved 11 November 2014.

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References

Political offices
Preceded by
Chairman of Committees of the House of Representatives
19261928
Succeeded by
New Zealand Parliament
New constituency Member of Parliament for Rotorua
19191928
Succeeded by