Frank Myler

Last updated

Frank Myler
Personal information
Full nameFrancis Myler
Born(1938-12-04)4 December 1938
Widnes, England
Died27 March 2020(2020-03-27) (aged 81)
Playing information
Position Stand-off
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1955–67 Widnes 367144714474
1967–71 St. Helens 1444624150
1972–73 Rochdale Hornets 5090027
Total561199918651
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1960–70 Great Britain 245000
1962 England 10000
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
197174 Rochdale Hornets 1447656353
197578 Widnes 1348844266
198081 Swinton 442421855
198187 Oldham 2901261541043
199192 Widnes 0000
Total61231416513351
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
197374 Great Britain 1150645
1978 England 1100100
Source: [1] [2] [3] [4]

Frank Myler (4 December 1938 – 27 March 2020) was an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1970s and 1980s. A Great Britain and England national representative centre or stand-off, he played at club level for Widnes and St. Helens, and also captained and coached Great Britain. [5]

Contents

Playing career

Myler played left-centre and scored a try in Widnes' 13–5 victory over Hull Kingston Rovers in the 1963–64 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 9 May 1964, in front of a crowd of 84,488. Myler played left-centre in St. Helens' 30–2 victory over Oldham in the 1968–69 Lancashire Cup Final at Central Park, Wigan on Friday 25 October 1968. Myler played at left-centre in St. Helens' 4–7 defeat by Wigan in the 1968 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final at Central Park, Wigan on Tuesday 17 December 1968. [6]

In the 1969–70 Northern Rugby Football League season's Championship Final Myler was voted man of the match winning the Harry Sunderland Trophy in St. Helens 24–12 victory over Leeds. In 1970, he captained the Lions squad. Following a heavy defeat in the first Test the Lions under Myler did not lose another game on the whole tour. Myler remains the last British captain to lift the Ashes trophy in Australia. He played stand-off in the 4–7 defeat by Leigh in the 1970–71 Lancashire Cup Final at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 28 November 1970. Myler left St. Helens in 1971 to take up the position of player-coach with the Rochdale Hornets from May 1971 until October 1974. [7]

Coaching career

After three seasons at Rochdale where he took the team to the Players No 6 trophy final, although they lost 27–16 to Warrington, Myler succeeded Vince Karalius as Widnes coach in May 1975. In May 1978 he was succeeded as Widnes coach by Doug Laughton. [8] After periods coaching at Oldham and Swinton Myler was appointed Great Britain coach in 1983 but after some early successes the team lost all six test matches to Australia and New Zealand during the 1984 Great Brian Lions tour and despite a win over Papua New Guinea in the last test of the tour Myler was not reappointed as coach. Thereafter, he returned to club coaching with Oldham and a second spell at Widnes. [7]

Myler coached England for one fixture beating Wales 60-13 on 28 May 1978.

Myler was one of the original thirteen former Widnes players inducted into the Widnes Hall of Fame in 1992. [9]

Myler died on 27 March 2020 after a long illness, aged 81. [10]

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References

  1. "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 13 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 13 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. RL Record Keeper's Club
  6. "1968-1968 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  7. 1 2 "Special Obituary Tribut: Frank Myler". Rugby League Journal. No. 71. 2020. pp. 24–25.
  8. "Coaching Register - Since 1972". rugby.widnes.tv. Chris Lines. Retrieved 30 December 2013.
  9. "Profile at saints.org.uk". saints.org.uk. 31 December 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2020.
  10. "Former Widnes and Great Britain centre Frank Myler dies aged 81". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 April 2020.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Doug Laughton
1986-1991
Coach
Widnes colours.svg
Widnes

1991-1992
Succeeded by
Phil Larder
1992-1994
Preceded by
Johnny Whiteley
1980-1982
Coach
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain

1983-1984
Succeeded by
Maurice Bamford
1985-1986
Preceded by
Peter Fox
1977-1977
Coach
Flag of England.svg
England

1978
Succeeded by
Eric Ashton
1979-1980
Preceded by
Dave Cox
??-1978
Coach
Oldhamcolours.svg
Oldham R.L.F.C.

1980-1987
Succeeded by
Eric Fitzsimmons
1988
Preceded by
Stan Gittins
1979-1980
Coach
Swintoncolours.svg
Swinton

1980-1981
Succeeded by
Tom Grainey
1981-1983
Preceded by
Vince Karalius
1972-1975
Coach
Widnes colours.svg
Widnes

1975-1978
Succeeded by
Doug Laughton
1978-1983
Preceded by
Coach
Rochdale colours.svg
Rochdale Hornets

1971-1974
Succeeded by
Graham Starkey
1974-1975