Frank Oliver Fowler

Last updated

Mayor

Frank Oliver Fowler
29th Mayor of Winnipeg
In office
20 June 1922 [1]  1922
Preceded by Edward Parnell
Succeeded by Seymour Farmer
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba for Brandon South
In office
1897–1903
Preceded by Herbert Graham
Succeeded by Alfred Carroll
Personal details
Born(1861-12-14)14 December 1861
Wingham, Canada West [2]
Died18 February 1945(1945-02-18) (aged 83)
unknown
Spouse(s)Elizabeth Nichol
Professionfarmer

Frank Oliver Fowler (14 December 1861 – 18 February 1945) [2] was a Canadian politician serving as a member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba, then in Winnipeg city politics as an alderman and subsequently as the 29th Mayor.

Legislative Assembly of Manitoba form the Legislature of Manitoba, Canada

The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is the deliberative assembly of the Manitoba Legislature in the Canadian province of Manitoba. Fifty-seven members are elected to this assembly at provincial general elections, all in single-member constituencies with first-past-the-post voting. Bills passed by the Legislative Assembly are given royal assent by the Queen of Canada in Right of Manitoba, represented by the Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba. The Manitoba Legislative Building is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge constituencies.

He moved from Ontario to the Brandon, Manitoba region in the early 1880s where he was a farmer. He established a grain company in Wawanesa in 1891 and became a leader in regional grain industry associations after Fowler and his family moved to Winnipeg in 1902.

Brandon, Manitoba City in Manitoba, Canada

Brandon is the second-largest city in the province of Manitoba, Canada. It is located in the southwestern corner of the province on the banks of the Assiniboine River, approximately 214 km (133 mi) west of the provincial capital, Winnipeg, and 120 km (75 mi) east of the Saskatchewan boundary. Brandon covers an area of 77.41 km2 and has a population of 48,859, while its census metropolitan area has a population of 58,003. It is the primary hub of trade and commerce for the Westman region as well as parts of southeastern Saskatchewan and northern North Dakota, an area with a combined population of over 180,000 people.

Wawanesa, Manitoba Unincorporated urban community in Manitoba, Canada

Wawanesa is an unincorporated urban community in the Municipality of Oakland – Wawanesa within the Canadian province of Manitoba that held village status prior to January 1, 2015. It is the birthplace of The Wawanesa Mutual Insurance Co.

Fowler was acclaimed to the Manitoba legislature for the South Brandon riding following a by-election on 20 November 1897. He was re-elected in the 1899 general provincial election and remained in provincial office until 1903. [3] After leaving provincial office, he became a city alderman in 1908 where he supported restrictions on trade unions. He was acclaimed Mayor on 20 June 1922, 11 days after Edward Parnell died in office. Fowler served as Mayor for the remainder of that year. [2]

A trade union is an association of workers forming a legal unit or legal personhood, usually called a "bargaining unit", which acts as bargaining agent and legal representative for a unit of employees in all matters of law or right arising from or in the administration of a collective agreement. Labour unions typically fund the formal organization, head office, and legal team functions of the labour union through regular fees or union dues. The delegate staff of the labour union representation in the workforce are made up of workplace volunteers who are appointed by members in democratic elections.

Edward Parnell was a Canadian politician, the 28th Mayor of Winnipeg from 1921 until his death in office.

His name is commemorated by Fowler Street in Winnipeg. [4]

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References

  1. "City Government Mayors, Past and Present". City of Winnipeg. Archived from the original on 25 December 2008. Retrieved 2009-01-11.
  2. 1 2 3 "Frank Oliver Fowler (1861-1945)". Manitoba Historical Society. 19 October 2008. Retrieved 9 January 2009.
  3. "MLA Biographies - Deceased". Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. 14 November 2008. Retrieved 11 January 2009.
  4. "History in Winnipeg Street Names". Manitoba Historical Society. 23 November 2008. Retrieved 11 January 2009.