Frank Worrell Trophy

Last updated

The Frank Worrell Trophy
Frank Worrell Trophy.jpg
The Frank Worrell Trophy
CountriesFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies
Administrator International Cricket Council
Format Test cricket
First edition1960–61 [1]
Latest edition2015–16
Next edition2022
Tournament formatTest series
Number of teams2
Current trophy holderFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia [1]
Most successfulFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia (14 series wins) [1]
Most runs WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg Brian Lara (2,815) [2]
Most wickets WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg Courtney Walsh (135) [3]

The Frank Worrell Trophy is awarded to the winner of the West IndiesAustralia Test match series in cricket. [4] The trophy is named after Frank Worrell who was the first black captain of the West Indies. It was first awarded at the end of the 1960–61 series in Australia, the first Test of which ended in a tie. [5] The Australian Cricket Board of Control and Don Bradman commissioned former Test cricketer and professional jeweller Ernie McCormick to create a perpetual trophy following the tie. [6] [7] The trophy's design incorporated a ball used in the tied Test. [7] [8]

Contents

As of 2019, Australia hold the trophy following their 2–0 series victory in the West Indies 2015–16 tour. [9] Australia also lead in overall wins, winning 14 of the 24 series, while the West Indies have won 8, the remaining 2 ending in draws (with the trophy being retained by the incumbents). [1] Brian Lara is the most successful batsman in the history of the trophy, scoring 2,815 runs for the West Indies in 56 innings at an average of 52.12. [2] He also holds the record for the highest score (277) which he made in the third Test at the Sydney Cricket Ground during the 1992–93 series. [10] West Indian fast bowler Courtney Walsh has taken the most wickets in the trophy, with 135 over 38 matches, at an average of 28.68, [3] while Australia's Graham McKenzie has the best bowling figures of 8 wickets for 71 runs, achieved in the second Test of the 1968–69 series. [10] Australian Mark Waugh has taken the most catches, with 45 in 28 matches, [11] while West Indian Jeff Dujon is the most successful wicketkeeper, making 84 dismissals in 23 matches. [12]

History

Frank Worrell became the first black captain of the West Indies cricket team prior to their 1960–61 tour of Australia. The first Test of the five-match series ended in a tie, the first in the history of Test cricket. [13] Don Bradman remarked to Australia captain Richie Benaud, "That is the greatest thing that's ever happened to the game". [14] Evelyn Wellings described the Test as "the Greatest Test Match, the Greatest Cricket Match and surely the Greatest Game ever played with a ball". [15] Despite that setback, with Benaud claiming the Australians had "thrown away a match", they went on to win the series 2–1 with one drawn Test. Former cricketer and journalist Johnny Moyes declared the series to be "the most wonderful cricket tour Australia has known". [14] The West Indies team received acclaim for their performances, the whole series was played in a convivial manner, [16] and the Australians, suitably impressed by Worrell, named the trophy after him. [5]

Winning the first and third Tests of the 1964–65 series, the West Indians took the trophy to the Caribbean for the first time. [17] The following three series were all won by Australia, with the 1975–76 series ending 5–1. [18] The West Indies sole Test victory in the latter series, at the WACA Ground in Perth, was by an innings and 87 runs. It featured an explosive innings from West Indian batsman Roy Fredericks who struck 169 from 145 deliveries and was described by former batsman Lindsay Hassett as the "greatest innings I've seen in Australia". [19] The 1977–78 series saw the beginning of fifteen years of West Indian dominance in the trophy, but it was not without controversy. [1] The first two Tests of that series were completed within three days, the second being notable for Graham Yallop becoming the first batsman to wear a helmet at the crease. [20] With the West Indies team departing to join Kerry Packer's World Series Cricket as the World Series Cricket West Indies XI, Australia managed a victory against the second-string team in the third Test but were beaten by 198 runs in the fourth. [21] The final Test saw the West Indies eight wickets down with more than 100 runs needed when Vanburn Holder was dismissed. Although the decision was legitimate, Holder's reaction on the way back to the pavilion was interpreted otherwise, and the Jamaican crowds began to riot. The match was abandoned, and with two of the three umpires refusing to consider a sixth day's play, the result was declared a draw. [22] The 1981–82 series was drawn overall, with one victory each and one draw, thus the West Indies retained the trophy. [1]

Courtney Walsh is the tournament's leading wicket-taker. Courtney Walsh (1) (cropped).jpg
Courtney Walsh is the tournament's leading wicket-taker.

After drawing the first two Tests of the 1983–84 series, the West Indies swept the Australians aside, winning the remaining Tests, two by ten wickets and one by an innings and 36 runs. [23] They continued their good form in the following series in Australia, with dominant wins in the first three Tests, losing the final Test (a dead rubber at that point) to secure the trophy with a 3–1 victory. [24] The West Indies were consistently superior over the next three series, winning seven Test matches to Australia's three, thereby holding the Frank Worrell Trophy from 1978 to 1993. [1] The final and deciding Test of the 1992–93 series saw Curtly Ambrose take seven wickets for one run in 32 deliveries, reducing Australia from 85 for 2 to 119 all out. [25] For the 1994–95 series, the West Indies brought in a new coach and a new manager. [26] Despite a fourth wicket stand of 124 between Brian Lara and Carl Hooper after the West Indies had been reduced to 6 runs for 3 wickets, Australia secured a ten-wicket victory inside three days. [27] A draw in the second Test was followed by a nine-wicket victory for the West Indies in the third. The fourth and final Test was later referred to as "make or break for both teams" by the Australian bowler Paul Reiffel. [28] Although Richie Richardson scored a century in the first innings, this was overshadowed by the Waugh brothers – Mark made 126 while Steve scored 200; together they shared a 231-run fourth wicket stand to push Australia to a formidable total. [29] The West Indies were dismissed without reaching Australia's first innings total, with Reiffel and Shane Warne taking four wickets each, [30] and the trophy went to Australia for the first time since 1976. [1]

Australia made it back-to-back series wins with a 3–2 victory in 1996–97, yet could only draw the series in the West Indies in 1998–99. [1] However, the 2000–01 series saw the emergence of a commanding Australian Test team, who would go undefeated against the West Indies to the present day. That series saw the Australians whitewash the Caribbeans, winning 5–0, the first such result since the West Indies toured Australia and New Zealand in 1930–31. [31] The defeat was unsurprising; the West Indies had been whitewashed in their previous three Test series, in Pakistan, South Africa and New Zealand. [31] Australia took the 2002–03 series 3–1, and won the following six series without losing a Test, including two more whitewashes in the 2005–06 series and 2015 series. [1] Overall, Australia have won 47 of the 101 Test matches played for the Frank Worrell Trophy, with the West Indies winning 30. [32]

Timeline

Frank Worrell Trophy

List of Test series

Brian Lara is the trophy's top scorer. BrianLaraUkexpatCropped.jpg
Brian Lara is the trophy's top scorer.
Mark Waugh is the most successful fielder in the history of the trophy, with 45 catches. Mark Waugh (Pic 2).jpg
Mark Waugh is the most successful fielder in the history of the trophy, with 45 catches.
Correct as of the end of the 2015–16 series
SeriesSeasonPlayed inFirst matchTests
played
Tests won
by Australia
Tests won
by West Indies
Tests
drawn
Series
result
Holder at
series end
Ref(s)
1 1960–61 Australia9 December 19605211Double-dagger-14-plain.pngAustraliaAustralia [33]
2 1964–65 West Indies3 March 19655122West IndiesWest Indies [17]
3 1968–69 Australia6 December 19685311AustraliaAustralia [34]
4 1972–73 West Indies16 February 19735203 [35]
5 1975–76 Australia28 November 19756510 [18]
6 1977–78 West Indies3 March 19785131West IndiesWest Indies [36]
7 1979–80 Australia1 December 19793021 [37]
8 1981–82 Australia26 December 19813111Drawn [38]
9 1983–84 West Indies2 March 19845032West Indies [23]
10 1984–85 Australia9 November 19845131 [24]
11 1988–89 Australia18 November 19885131 [39]
12 1990–91 West Indies1 March 19915122 [40]
13 1992–93 Australia27 November 19925122 [41]
14 1994–95 West Indies31 March 19954211AustraliaAustralia [42]
15 1996–97 Australia22 November 19965320 [43]
16 1998–99 West Indies5 March 19994220Drawn [44]
17 2000–01 Australia23 November 20005500Australia [45]
18 2002–03 West Indies10 April 20034310 [46]
19 2005–06 Australia3 November 20053300 [47]
20 2008 West Indies22 May 20083201 [48]
21 2009–10 Australia26 November 20093201 [49]
22 2011–12 West Indies7 April 20123201 [50]
23 2015 West Indies3 June 20152200 [51]
24 2015–16 Australia10 December 20153201 [52]

Summary of results

Totals up to and including the 2015–16 series in Australia
PlayedWon by
Australia
Won by
West Indies
Drawn
Tests10147 (47%)30 (30%)24 (23%)Double-dagger-14-plain.png
Series2414 (58%)8 (33%)2 (8%)

Related Research Articles

Frank Worrell West Indian cricketer

Sir Frank Mortimer Maglinne Worrell, sometimes referred to by his nickname of Tae, was a West Indies cricketer and Jamaican senator. A stylish right-handed batsman and useful left-arm seam bowler, he became famous in the 1950s as the first black captain of the West Indies cricket team. Along with Everton Weekes and Clyde Walcott, he formed what was known as "The Three Ws" of the West Indian cricket. He was the first of the two batsmen to have been involved in two 500-run partnerships in first-class cricket, the latter being Ravindra Jadeja.

James Anderson (cricketer) English cricketer

James Michael Anderson,, usually known as Jimmy Anderson, is an English international cricketer who plays for Lancashire County Cricket Club and the England cricket team. Anderson is the all-time leading wicket-taker among fast bowlers surpassing Glenn McGrath and holds the record of most wickets for England in both Test and One-Day International (ODI) cricket. He is the only English bowler, and the 6th overall, to pass 500 Test wickets.

Paul Ronald Reiffel is an Australian former cricketer who played in 35 Tests and 92 One Day Internationals (ODIs) from 1992 to 1999. He was part of Australia's victorious 1999 World Cup team. After retirement he became a first-class cricket umpire. He is currently a member of the Elite Panel of ICC Umpires.

Darren Sammy West Indian cricketer

Darren Julius Garvey Sammy, is a Saint Lucian cricketer who played international cricket for the West Indies. He is a two time T20 World Cup winning captain. He plays as a right-handed batsman and a fast-medium bowler. On making his One-Day International (ODI) debut against Bangladesh in 2004, Sammy became the first person from the island of St Lucia to play international cricket. Three years later he made his Test debut against England, taking 7/66 which were the best bowling figures for a West Indian in his first Test since Alf Valentine in 1950. Sammy was appointed West Indies captain in October 2010. He scored his maiden Test century in May 2012 during a match against England.

The West Indian cricket team in England in 1973 played 17 first-class matches including three Tests. The team won the series against England by two matches to nil, with one drawn game. It also won the Prudential Trophy for the one-day series.

The West Indies cricket team toured Australia in the 1960-61 season under the captaincy of Frank Worrell. Both Worrell and his opposing captain, Richie Benaud, encouraged their teams to play attacking cricket. The first Test of the five match series ended in a dramatic tie, the first of only two instances in Test cricket. Though West Indies narrowly lost the series 2-1, with one draw in addition to the tie, they might easily have won both the last two matches and taken the series 3-1. They took much credit for contributing to such an exciting series and made themselves extremely popular with the Australian public. Prior to their departure from Australia, the team were paraded through Melbourne in open-top cars on 17 February 1961, and were cheered by enormous crowds.

This article describes the history of West Indies cricket from 1991 to 2000.

Ravichandran Ashwin Indian cricketer

Ravichandran Ashwin is an Indian international cricketer. An all-rounder who bats right-handed and bowls right-arm off break, Ashwin plays for Tamil Nadu in domestic cricket and Delhi Capitals in the Indian Premier League. He is the fastest Indian bowler to reach the 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, 300- and 350-wicket mark in Test cricket in terms of number of innings. In 2016, he became the third Indian to win the ICC Cricketer of the Year award.

Ben Stokes English international cricketer

Benjamin Andrew Stokes is an English international cricketer and current vice-captain of the England Test team. Stokes was part of the England squad that won the 2019 Cricket World Cup.

Australian cricket team in the West Indies in 1998–99 International cricket tour

The Australian cricket team toured the Caribbean from February to April 1999 to play four Tests and seven One Day International (ODIs) against the West Indies. Australia additionally played three first-class matches, winning two and drawing one. The Test series was drawn 2–2 resulting in Australia retaining the Frank Worrell Trophy. The ODI series was also drawn with three wins each and one tie. This is the first four-match series in the history of Test cricket to finish as a two all draw. The only other four-match Test series, as of January 2020, to finish with the same result was England at home to Pakistan in 2006. The West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) announced in June 1998 that Sabina Park would host the first Test – the first following the abandonment of the Test between England and the West Indies after just 62 deliveries in January 1998.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "Records / The Frank Worrell Trophy / Series results". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 23 November 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  2. 1 2 "Records / The Frank Worrell Trophy / Most runs". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  3. 1 2 "Records / The Frank Worrell Trophy / Most wickets". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  4. "Captain extraordinaire". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  5. 1 2 Chowdhury, Saj (2 April 2003). "Legend behind the Worrell Trophy". BBC Sport. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  6. "Obituary – Ernie McCormick". Wisden Almanack. 1992. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  7. 1 2 "The tied Test film: A fitting tribute". National Museum of Australia . Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  8. Haigh, Gideon (10 December 2015). "Frank Worrell Trophy is a true rarity". The Australian . Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  9. "Draw in Sydney but Australia retain Frank Worrell trophy after Warner's ton". The Guardian. Reuters. 7 January 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  10. 1 2 Gopalakrishnan, Akshay (29 December 2015). "Infographic: Frank Worrell Trophy before and after Waugh twins". Wisden India. Archived from the original on 11 March 2017. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  11. "Records / The Frank Worrell Trophy / Most catches". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 14 August 2018. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  12. "Records / The Frank Worrell Trophy / Most dismissals". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 14 August 2018. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  13. Cozier, Tony (12 July 2015). "A series greater than the 2005 Ashes?". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  14. 1 2 "Legends recall classic Test". BBC Sport. 20 November 2000. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  15. Ryder, Rowland. "The glorious uncertainty". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 9 July 2017.
  16. Coverdale, Brydon (4 August 2011). "'The most incredible game'". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  17. 1 2 "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1964/65". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  18. 1 2 "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1975/76". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  19. Mallett, Ashley (30 January 2013). "Shine on me, Roy". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  20. "Australia tour of West Indies, 2nd Test: West Indies v Australia at Bridgetown, Mar 17–19, 1978". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  21. "Australia tour of West Indies, 4th Test: West Indies v Australia at Port of Spain, Apr 15–18, 1978". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  22. Toohey, Peter. "Rumble in Jamaica". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  23. 1 2 "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1983/84". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  24. 1 2 "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1984/85". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  25. "Curtly's seventh heaven". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  26. Oliver, Scott (4 June 2015). "'Going to Perth in '93, we just knew we were going to win'". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  27. "Australia tour of West Indies, 1st Test: West Indies v Australia at Bridgetown, Mar 31 – Apr 2, 1995". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  28. Reiffel, Paul. "We'll take it from here". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  29. Selvey, Mike (11 July 2010). "A fiery beginning to the end of an empire". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  30. "Australia tour of West Indies, 4th Test: West Indies v Australia at Kingston, Apr 29 – May 3, 1995". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  31. 1 2 Croft, Colin (6 January 2001). "Australia deserve 5–0 success". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  32. "Records / The Frank Worrell Trophy / Result summary". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  33. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1960/61". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  34. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1968/69". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  35. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1972/73". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  36. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1977/78". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  37. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1979/80". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  38. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1981/82". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  39. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1988/89". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  40. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1990/91". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  41. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1992/93". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  42. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1994/95". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  43. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1996/97". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  44. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 1998/99". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  45. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 2000/01". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  46. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 2003". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  47. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 2005/06". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  48. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 2008". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  49. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 2009/10". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  50. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 2011/12". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  51. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 2015". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  52. "The Frank Worrell Trophy 2015/16". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 6 June 2017.