Fred Enke

Last updated
Fred Enke
Fred Enke.jpg
Enke at the University of Arizona, c. 1960
Biographical details
Born(1897-07-12)July 12, 1897
Rochester, Minnesota
DiedNovember 2, 1985(1985-11-02) (aged 88)
Casa Grande, Arizona
Playing career
Football
1918–1920 Minnesota
Basketball
1919–1921 Minnesota
Position(s) Tackle (football)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1922 South Dakota State (assistant)
1923–1924 Louisville
1925–1930 Arizona (assistant)
1931 Arizona
1932–1962 Arizona (assistant)
Basketball
1923–1925 Louisville
1925–1961 Arizona
Baseball
1924–1925 Louisville
Golf
1935–1967 Arizona
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1923–1925 Louisville
Head coaching record
Overall11–13–2 (football)
523–344 (basketball)
7–6 (baseball)
209–101–13 (golf)
TournamentsBasketball
0–1 (NCAA)
0–3 (NIT)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Basketball
12 Border (1932, 1933, 1936, 1940, 1943, 1946–1951, 1953)

Fred August Enke (July 12, 1897 – November 2, 1985) was an American football and basketball player, coach of football, basketball, baseball, and golf, and college athletics administrator. The Rochester, Minnesota native coached basketball for two seasons at the University of Louisville (1923–1925) and 36 seasons at the University of Arizona (1925–1961), compiling a career college basketball record of 522–344 (.603). Enke also spent two seasons as head football coach at Louisville (1923–1924) and one season as the head football coach at Arizona (1931), tallying a career college football mark of 11–13–2. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Louisville for two seasons (1924–1925) and the school's athletic director from 1923 to 1925. Enke's son, Fred William Enke, played seven seasons in the National Football League (NFL). [1]

Contents

According to historian David Leighton, the street Enke Drive, on the University of Arizona campus is named in honor of Fred A. Enke. There is also the Fred Enke golf course in far eastern Tucson.

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Louisville Cardinals (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1923–1924)
1923 Louisville 5–3
1924 Louisville 3–5–1
Louisville:8–8–1
Arizona Wildcats (Border Conference)(1931)
1931 Arizona 3–5–11–1–1T–2nd
Arizona:3–5–11–1–1
Total:11–13–2

Basketball

Statistics overview
SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Louisville Cardinals (Independent)(1923–1925)
1923–24 Louisville 4–13
1924–25 Louisville 10–7
Louisville:14–20 (.412)
Arizona Wildcats (Independent)(1925–1931)
1925–26 Arizona 6–7
1926–27 Arizona 13–4
1927–28 Arizona 13–3
1928–29 Arizona 19–4
1929–30 Arizona 15–6
1930–31 Arizona 9–6
Arizona Wildcats (Border Conference)(1931–1961)
1931–32 Arizona 18–28–21st
1932–33 Arizona 19–57–32nd
1933–34 Arizona 18–99–32nd
1934–35 Arizona 11–85–74th
1935–36 Arizona 16–711–51st
1936–37 Arizona 14–119–73rd
1937–38 Arizona 13–89–72nd
1938–39 Arizona 12–118–105th
1939–40 Arizona 15–1012–4T–1st
1940–41 Arizona 11–7
1941–42 Arizona 9–136–10T–6th
1942–43 Arizona 22–211–12nd
1943–44 Arizona 12–2
1944–45 Arizona 7–113–46th
1945–46 Arizona 25–513–21st NIT Quarterfinal
1946–47 Arizona 21–314–21st
1947–48 Arizona 19–1012–41st
1948–49 Arizona 17–1113–31st
1949–50 Arizona 26–514–21st NIT First Round
1950–51 Arizona 24–615–11st NCAA first round, NIT Quarterfinal
1951–52 Arizona 11–166–8T–4th
1952–53 Arizona 15–1111–3T–1st
1953–54 Arizona 14–108–43rd
1954–55 Arizona 8–173–96th
1955–56 Arizona 11–156–6T–4th
1956–57 Arizona 13–135–53rd
1957–58 Arizona 10–154–6T–4th
1958–59 Arizona 4–221–96th
1959–60 Arizona 10–144–64th
1960–61 Arizona 11–155–53rd
Arizona:509–324 (.611)232–138 (.627)
Total:523–344 (.603)

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

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References

  1. Hansen, Greg (January 21, 2014). Former UA, NFL QB Enke still stands tall. Arizona Daily Star.