Fred Huish

Last updated

Fred Huish
Personal information
Full nameFrederick Henry Huish
Born(1869-11-15)15 November 1869
Clapham, Surrey
Died16 March 1957(1957-03-16) (aged 87)
Northiam, Sussex
BattingRight-handed
Role Wicket-keeper
Relations Francis Huish (brother)
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
1895–1914 Kent
FC debut3 June 1895 Kent v  Warwickshire
Last FC 31 August 1914 Kent v  Hampshire
Career statistics
Competition First-class
Matches497
Runs scored7,547
Batting average 12.85
100s/50s0/12
Top score93
Balls bowled101
Wickets 0
Bowling average
5 wickets in innings
10 wickets in match
Best bowling
Catches/stumpings 933/377
Source: CricInfo, 4 February 2010

Frederick Henry Huish (15 November 1869 – 16 March 1957), known as Fred Huish, was an English professional cricketer who played as a wicket-keeper for Kent County Cricket Club in the period before the First World War. Huish played over 450 times for Kent and was part of the sides which won four County championship titles in the Golden Age of cricket leading up to the war. He holds the record for the most dismissals by a wicket-keeper in first-class cricket who did not play a Test match. [1]

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

Wicket-keeper fielding position in cricket

The wicket-keeper in the sport of cricket is the player on the fielding side who stands behind the wicket or stumps being watchful of the batsman and be ready to take a catch, stump the batsman out and run out a batsman when occasion arises. The wicket-keeper is the only member of the fielding side permitted to wear gloves and external leg guards. The role of the keeper is governed by Law 27 of the Laws of Cricket.

Kent County Cricket Club English cricket club

Kent County Cricket Club is one of the eighteen first-class county clubs within the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales. It represents the historic county of Kent. The club was first founded in 1842 but teams representing the county have played top-class cricket since the early 18th century and the club has always held first-class status. Kent have competed in the County Championship since the official start of the competition in 1890 and have played in every top-level domestic cricket competition in England. The club's limited overs team is called the Kent Spitfires after the Supermarine Spitfire.

Contents

Huish became an influential figure and senior professional at Kent at a time when amateur cricketers were the only acceptable captains in English county cricket. He was described in his Wisden obituary as "one of the ablest and least demonstrative wicket-keepers of his generation". [2]

<i>Wisden Cricketers Almanack</i>

Wisden Cricketers' Almanack is a cricket reference book published annually in the United Kingdom. The description "bible of cricket" was first used in the 1930s by Alec Waugh in a review for the London Mercury. In October 2013, an all-time Test World XI was announced to mark the 150th anniversary of Wisden Cricketers' Almanack.

Cricket career

Huish made his debut for Kent at the age of 25 in 1895 against Warwickshire at Edgbaston. [3] He played three times in 1895 before going on to become the regular wicket-keeper for Kent from 1896 to 1914, making at least 19 appearances each season for the County. [4] In 1899 he dismissed a then-record 79 batsmen, including taking eight catches in one match at Trent Bridge against Nottinghamshire, and went on to become the first wicket-keeper to take 100 dismissals in a season in 1911. [2] [5] [6]

Warwickshire County Cricket Club english Cricket Club

Warwickshire County Cricket Club is one of eighteen first-class county clubs within the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales. It represents the historic county of Warwickshire. Its 50 overs team is called the Warwickshire Bears and its T20 team the Birmingham Bears. Founded in 1882, the club held minor status until it was elevated to first-class in 1894 pending its entry into the County Championship in 1895. Since then, Warwickshire have played in every top-level domestic cricket competition in England. Warwickshire's kit colours are black and gold and the shirt sponsor is Gullivers Sports Travel. The club's home is Edgbaston Cricket Ground in south Birmingham, which regularly hosts Test and One Day International matches.

Edgbaston Cricket Ground cricket ground in the Edgbaston area of Birmingham, England

Edgbaston Cricket Ground, also known as the County Ground or Edgbaston Stadium, is a cricket ground in the Edgbaston area of Birmingham, England. It is home to Warwickshire County Cricket Club, and is also used for Test matches, One Day Internationals and Twenty20 Internationals. Edgbaston has also hosted the T20 domestic finals day more than any other cricket ground.

Trent Bridge cricket ground located in West Bridgford, Nottinghamshire, England

Trent Bridge is a cricket ground mostly used for Test, One-day international and County cricket located in West Bridgford, Nottinghamshire, England, just across the River Trent from the city of Nottingham. Trent Bridge is also the headquarters of Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club. As well as International cricket and Nottinghamshire's home games, the ground has hosted the Finals Day of the Twenty20 Cup twice. In 2009 the ground was used for the ICC World Twenty20 and hosted the semi-final between South Africa and Pakistan. The site takes its name from the nearby main bridge over the Trent, and is also close to Meadow Lane and the City Ground, the football stadia of Notts County and Nottingham Forest respectively.

Huish repeated this feat in 1913 and, as of November 2017, remains the record holder for most dismissals in a career for Kent with a total of 1,254 dismissals in 469 matches. [7] He is also second on the all-time list of first-class stumpings in a career with 377, second only to another Kent wicket-keeper Les Ames. [8] [9] Huish is generally considered the first in a line of great Kent wicket-keepers including the likes of Ames, Godfrey Evans and Alan Knott. [2] [10] [11] He kept Jack Hubble, who succeeded Huish behind the stumps after World War I, out of the wicket-keeper role in the Kent side. [10] Despite his record-breaking career he was never chosen as one of Wisden's Cricketers of the Year [5] and was never called into the England side, although is he often considered unlucky not to have played internationally. [2] [12]

Les Ames Cricket player of England.

Leslie Ethelbert George Ames was a wicket-keeper and batsman for the England cricket team and Kent County Cricket Club. In his obituary, the Wisden of 1991 described him as the greatest wicket-keeper-batsman of all time. He is the only wicket keeper- batsman to score hundred first class centuries.

Godfrey Evans cricketer

Thomas Godfrey Evans was an English cricketer who played for Kent and England. Described by Wisden as 'arguably the best wicket-keeper the game has ever seen', Evans collected 219 dismissals in 91 Test match appearances between 1946 and 1959 and a total of 1066 in all first-class matches. En route he was the first wicket keeper to reach 200 Test dismissals and the first Englishman to reach both 1000 runs and 100 dismissals and 2000 runs and 200 dismissals in Test cricket. He was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1951.

Alan Philip Eric Knott is a former cricketer who represented England at international level in both Tests and One-Day Internationals (ODI). Knott is widely regarded as one of the most eccentric characters in cricket, and is also regarded as one of the greatest wicket-keepers to ever play the game. He was described by cricket journalist Simon Wilde as "a natural gloveman, beautifully economical in his movements and armed with tremendous powers of concentration".

In August 1911 Huish made ten dismissals in a single match against Surrey at The Oval, [2] a Kent record he holds jointly with Hubble. [7] Nine of the dismissals were stumpings, the only time a wicket-keeper has claimed nine victims stumped in a match, beating the previous record of eight stumpings by Ted Pooley in 1878. [8] [7] [13]

Surrey County Cricket Club English cricket club

Surrey County Cricket Club is one of eighteen first-class county clubs within the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales. It represents the historic county of Surrey and also South London. The club's limited overs team is called "Surrey". The club was founded in 1845 but teams representing the county have played top-class cricket since the early 18th century and the club has always held first-class status. Surrey have competed in the County Championship since the official start of the competition in 1890 and have played in every top-level domestic cricket competition in England.

The Oval cricket ground in Kennington, South London

The Oval, currently referred to for sponsorship purposes as the Kia Oval, is an international cricket ground in Kennington, in the London Borough of Lambeth, in south London. The Oval has been the home ground of Surrey County Cricket Club since it was opened in 1845. It was the first ground in England to host international Test cricket in September 1880. The final Test match of the English season is traditionally played there.

Edward William 'Ted' Pooley was an English cricketer. Ted Pooley's greatest claim to fame is that he should have been England's first Test match wicket-keeper. The story is a good one, but it overshadows the fact that he played cricket for Surrey and Middlesex between 1861 and 1883, and was held in the highest regard for his cricketing ability if not for his personal behaviour.

Huish played as the first choice wicket-keeper in each of Kent's County Championship winning sides of the period between 1906 and 1913. He made 151 consecutive Championship appearances for the County between 1909 and 1914 [14] and was considered a major influence on the team - Wisden writing that he exerted "remarkable control over his colleagues" and that others would not appeal for a catch at the wicket unless he appealed first. [2] He was a relatively poor batsman, although he scored 500 runs in a season a number of times and had a highest scored of 93. [2] [4]

County Championship

The County Championship, currently known as the Specsavers County Championship for sponsorship reasons, is the domestic first-class cricket competition in England and Wales and is organised by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB). It became an official title in 1890. The competition consists of eighteen clubs named after, and originally representing, historic counties, seventeen from England and one from Wales. From 2016, the Championship has been sponsored by Specsavers, who replaced Liverpool Victoria after 14 years.

Huish played his final first-class match at the end of the 1914 County Championship season. After the First World War, Huish, aged 49, did not resume his cricket career. In total he played 469 first-class matches for Kent and 22 times for MCC. He was selected just once for the Players and made single appearances for a variety of other teams. [15]

Personal life

Huish was born in 1869 in Clapham, at that time part of Surrey. His older brother, Francis played five first-class matches for Kent in 1895 as well as making appearances for other teams in non-first-class matches. Huish died in Northiam in Sussex in 1957 aged 87. [16]

Related Research Articles

Herbert Strudwick Cricket player of England.

Herbert "Bert" Strudwick was an English wicket-keeper. During his career, his record of 1493 dismissals is the third-highest by any wicket-keeper in the history of first-class cricket.

Robert William Taylor is an English former cricketer who played as wicket-keeper for Derbyshire between 1961 and 1984 and for England between 1971 and 1984. He made 57 Test, and 639 first-class cricket appearances in total, taking 1,473 catches. The 2,069 victims across his entire career is the most of any wicket-keeper in history. He is considered as one of the world's most accomplished wicket-keepers. He made his first-class debut for Minor Counties against South Africa in 1960, having made his Staffordshire debut in 1958. He became Derbyshire's first choice wicket-keeper when George Dawkes sustained a career-ending injury. His final First Class appearance was at the Scarborough Festival in 1988. He remained first choice until his retirement except for a short period in 1964 when Laurie Johnson was tried as a batsman-wicketkeeper.

Arthur Fielder was an English professional cricketer who played as a fast bowler for Kent County Cricket Club and the England cricket team between 1900 and 1914. He played a major role in Kent's four County Championship wins in the years before World War I and toured Australia twice with the England team making six Test match appearances. He was chosen as one of Wisden's Cricketers of the Year in 1907.

James Graham Binks is a former English cricketer who played as a wicket-keeper for Yorkshire. Although he was regarded by many as the best wicket-keeper of his generation, his limited batting ability restricted him to just two Test match appearances for England, both on the 1963-64 tour to India. Ironically, because of injuries to other players, he opened the batting in three of his four Test innings.

Harry Robert Murrell, known as Joe Murrell, was an English cricketer who played over 350 matches, mainly for Middlesex County Cricket Club as a wicket-keeper.

George Owen Dawkes was a first-class cricketer who played for Leicestershire between 1937 and 1939 and for Derbyshire between 1947 and 1961 as a wicket keeper and a lower-order right-handed batsman. During the 1949–50 season he toured India with a team of players making up a Commonwealth XI.

John Charlton Hubble, known as Jack Hubble, was an English professional cricketer who played first-class cricket for Kent County Cricket Club in the first half of the 20th century. He was a right-handed batsman and wicket-keeper who played professionally for 25 years and was part of the Kent teams which won four County Championships before World War I.

Harold William Stephenson was an English first-class cricketer who played for Somerset. He captained Somerset from 1960 until his retirement in 1964.

Anthony Waldron Catt was an English cricketer who played as a wicket-keeper for Kent County Cricket Club. He was born in Edenbridge, Kent in 1933 and made his first-class cricket debut in 1954 against Oxford University. He died in August 2018 aged 84.

Edward William John Brooks was an English cricketer. A wicket-keeper, he played first-class cricket for Surrey from 1925 to 1939, all but five of his first-class appearances being for the county. Only Herbert Strudwick has exceeded his 810 dismissals for the county.

Arthur Newton (cricketer) English cricketer

Arthur Edward Newton was an English cricketer who played for Somerset in the county's pre-first-class days and then for more than 20 years after the team entered the County Championship in 1891. He also played for Oxford University and for a variety of amateur teams. As a cricketer, he was known as "A. E.", not by his forename.

Raymond Munds was an English professional cricketer who played seven first-class cricket matches for Kent County Cricket Club in the early 20th century. Munds was a left-handed batsman who bowled right-arm slow. He was born at Lydd in Kent.

Adam Rouse English cricketer

Adam Paul Rouse is a Zimbabwean-born English cricketer who plays for Kent County Cricket Club. Rouse is a right-handed batsman who fields as a wicket-keeper, although he is considered versatile enough to play solely as a specialist batsman. Rouse has played for England at Under-19 level and made his first-class debut in 2013 for Hampshire. He played for Gloucestershire in 2014 before joining Kent ahead of the 2016 season.

Maurice David Fenner was an English military airman and amateur cricketer. He rose to the rank of Group Captain in the Royal Air Force, played first-class cricket for Combined Services and Kent County Cricket Club and was secretary of the county club in later life.

Kent County Cricket Club's 1906 season was the seventeenth season in which the county competed in the County Championship and saw the county win their first Championship title. Kent played 25 first-class cricket matches during the season, losing only four matches overall and only two matches in the 1906 County Championship. They finished equal on points with Yorkshire and Surrey but won the title on the percentage of finished matches won.

Kent County Cricket Club's 1909 season was the twentieth season in which the County competed in the County Championship. Kent played 30 first-class cricket matches during the season, losing only two matches overall, and won their second Championship title. They finished clearly ahead of second place Lancashire in the 1909 County Championship with the previous years winners Yorkshire in third place.

Kent County Cricket Club's 1910 season was the 21st season in which the County competed in the County Championship. Kent played 29 first-class cricket matches during the season, losing only five matches overall, and won their third Championship title. They finished well ahead of second place Surrey in the 1910 County Championship.

Francis Edward Huish was an English cricketer who played first-class cricket for Kent County Cricket Club during the 1895 English cricket season. He was born in Clapham in what was then Surrey in 1867 and died in Los Angeles, California in 1955.

References

  1. Walmsley, Keith (2003). Mosts Without in Test Cricket. Reading, England: Keith Walmsley Publishing Pty Ltd. p. 457. ISBN   0947540067..
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Fred Huish - Obituary, Wisden Cricketers' Almanack , 1958. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  3. First-class matches played by Fred Huish, CricketArchive. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  4. 1 2 First-class batting and fielding in each season by Fred Huish, CricketArchive. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  5. 1 2 Wilde S (2013) Wisden Cricketers of the Year: A Celebration of Cricket's Greatest Players, A&C Black, p.3.
  6. Berry S (2015) Cricket: The Game of Life: Every reason to celebrate, Hachette UK. (Available online), retrieved 2016-04-10.
  7. 1 2 3 'Field and wicket-keeping records' in Kent County Cricket Club Annual 2017, pp.206–208. Canterbury: Kent County Cricket Club.
  8. 1 2 Scott L (2011) Bats, Balls & Bails: The Essential Cricket Book, Random House. (Available online), retrieved 2016-04-10.
  9. Most stumpings in career, CricInfo. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  10. 1 2 Hubble, John Charlton - Obituaries in 1966, Wisden Cricketers' Almanack , 1966. Retrieved 2016-04-08.
  11. Sengupta A (2013) Alan Knott: Arguably greatest wicketkeeper ever, Cricket Country, 2013-04-09. Retrieved 2016-04-08.
  12. A brief history, Kent County Cricket Club. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  13. Mukherjee A (2016) Fred Huish effects 9 stumpings in a match, Cricket Country, 2016-08-23. Retrieved 2016-08-25.
  14. Geraint Jones reaches impressive County Championship milestone, Kent County Cricket Club, 2012-09-03. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  15. First-class batting and fielding for each team by Fred Huish, CricketArchive. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  16. Fred Huish, CricInfo. Retrieved 2017-11-16.