Frederick I, Duke of Upper Lorraine

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Frederick I (c. 912 18 May 978) was the count of Bar and duke of Upper Lorraine. He was a son of Wigeric, count of Bidgau, also count palatine of Lorraine, and Cunigunda, [1] and thus a sixth generation descendant of Charlemagne.

Wigeric or Wideric was the count of the Bidgau and held the rights of a count within the city of Trier. He received also the advocacy of the Abbey of Saint Rumbold at Mechelen from Charles III of France. From 915 or 916, he was the count palatine of Lotharingia. He was the founder of the House of Ardennes.

Count palatine is a high noble title, used to render several comital styles, in some cases also shortened to Palatine, which can have other meanings as well.

Cunigunda was the daughter of Ermentrude of France, daughter in turn of Louis the Stammerer, king of the Franks. The identity of her father is unknown. In 898 her uncle Charles III gained control as king of the Franks, changing Cunigunda's life for the better.

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In 954, he married Beatrice, daughter of Hugh the Great, count of Paris, and Hedwige of Saxony. [2] He received in dowry the revenues of the abbey of Saint-Denis in Lorraine. To stop incursions from the duchy of Champagne, Frederick constructed a castle over the Ornain river in 960, and later occupied confiscated lands of Saint-Mihiel. [3] He exchanged fiefs with the bishop of Toul. Thus, he created his own feudal domain, the county of Bar. So he became the founder of the House of Bar or the House of Ardennes-Bar, a cadet branch of the House of Ardennes.

Beatrice of France

Beatrice of France or Beatrice of Paris was duchess consort of Upper Lorraine by marriage to Frederick I, Duke of Upper Lorraine, and regent of Upper Lorraine in 978-980 during the minority of her son Thierry I.

Hugh the Great Duke of the Franks, Count of Paris and ancestor of the Capetian dynasty

Hugh the Great was the Duke of the Franks and Count of Paris.

Count of Paris

Count of Paris was a title for the local magnate of the district around Paris in Carolingian times. After Hugh Capet was elected King of France in 987, the title merged into the crown and fell into disuse. However, it was later revived by the Orléanist pretenders to the French throne in an attempt to evoke the legacy of Capet and his dynasty.

The duchy of Lorraine was at that time governed by the archbishop of Cologne, Bruno, who was called the archduke on account of his dual title. In 959, Bruno, in concert with his brother, the Emperor Otto I, divided the duchy, appointing as margraves (or vice-dukes) one Godfrey in Lower Lorraine and Frederick in Upper Lorraine. After Bruno's death, in 977, Frederick and Godfrey were styling themselves dukes.

Archbishop of Cologne Wikimedia list article

The Archbishop of Cologne is an archbishop representing the Archdiocese of Cologne of the Catholic Church in western North Rhine-Westphalia and northern Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany and was ex officio one of the electors of the Holy Roman Empire, the Elector of Cologne, from 1356 to 1801.

Archduke

Archduke was the title borne from 1358 by the Habsburg rulers of the Archduchy of Austria, and later by all senior members of that dynasty. It denotes a rank within the former Holy Roman Empire (962–1806), which was below that of Emperor and King and above that of (debatably) a Grand Duke, Duke and Prince.

Margrave was originally the medieval title for the military commander assigned to maintain the defence of one of the border provinces of the Holy Roman Empire or of a kingdom. That position became hereditary in certain feudal families in the Empire, and the title came to be borne by rulers of some Imperial principalities until the abolition of the Empire in 1806. Thereafter, those domains were absorbed in larger realms or the titleholders adopted titles indicative of full sovereignty.

As duke, Frederick oversaw the reform of Saint-Dié and Moyenmoutier. [4]

Moyenmoutier Commune in Grand Est, France

Moyenmoutier is a commune in the Vosges department in Grand Est in northeastern France.

Family

His children were:

Adalbero II of Metz was a Roman Catholic bishop of the 10th and 11th centuries. From 984 he was bishop of Verdun and from 984 until his death bishop of Metz. He was the son of Frederick I, Duke of Upper Lorraine and Beatrice of France, daughter of Hugh the Great.

Radbot, Count of Habsburg 11th-century German nobleman

Radbot, Count of Habsburg, also known as Radbot of Klettgau, was Graf (Count) of the county of Klettgau on the High Rhine in Swabia. Radbot was one of the progenitors of the Habsburg dynasty, and he chose to name his fortress Habsburg.

Notes

  1. Nash 2017, p. xxvi.
  2. Wickham 2009, p. 450.
  3. Evergates 1995, p. 96.
  4. Reuter 1992, p. 49.
  5. Leyser 1994, p. 166.

Sources


Preceded by
none
Blason Lorraine.svg
Duke of Upper Lorraine

942–978
Succeeded by
Thierry I


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