Frederick Wilson (film editor)

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Frederick Wilson (13 August 1912, London, UK – August 1994, Cambridge) [1] was a British film editor and director. [2]

Contents

Selected filmography

Editor

Director

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The following are the "Top 100 Greatest Films of All Time" according to the worldwide opinion polls conducted by Sight & Sound and published in the journal's September 2012 issue. They published the critics' list, based on 846 critics, programmers, academics, and distributors, and the directors' list, based on 358 directors and filmmakers. Sight & Sound, published by the British Film Institute, has conducted a poll of the greatest films every 10 years since 1952.

References

  1. "Frederick Wilson".
  2. "Frederick Wilson". bfi.org.uk. British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 4 August 2012. Retrieved 11 September 2015.