Fredric Steinkamp

Last updated
Fredric Steinkamp
Born
Fredric W. Steinkamp

(1928-08-22)August 22, 1928
DiedFebruary 20, 2002(2002-02-20) (aged 73)
Occupation Film editor
Years active1960–1995

Fredric Steinkamp (August 22, 1928 – February 20, 2002) was an American film editor with more than 40 film credits. [1] [2] He had a longstanding, notable collaboration with director Sydney Pollack, editing nearly all of Pollack's films from They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969) through Sabrina (1995).

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Steinkamp began his career working part-time in the sound department of the MGM Studios. He became an assistant editor at MGM, and worked for Adrienne Fazan, Ralph E. Winters, Jack Dunning, and Harold F. Kress. Kress recommended Steinkamp as the editor for The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (directed by Michael Curtiz, 1960), which was Steinkamp's first editing credit. [3] From 1980 on, Steinkamp co-edited most films with his son, William Steinkamp; after 1995, William Steinkamp became Sydney Pollack's principal editor through the end of the latter's career in 2005.

Steinkamp won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing for Grand Prix (directed by John Frankenheimer, 1966). He was nominated for the Academy Award for editing four films directed by Pollack: They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969), Three Days of the Condor (1975), Tootsie (1982), and Out of Africa (1985). All of these films had co-editors, including his son William Steinkamp for the last two. He was nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Editing for They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969). He was nominated for ACE Eddie awards for editing The Unsinkable Molly Brown (directed by Charles Walters - 1964), Grand Prix (1966), Tootsie (1982), and Out of Africa (1985).

In 2001 Steinkamp received the Career Achievement Award of the American Cinema Editors (ACE).

See also

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References

  1. Birth and death dates taken from the Social Security Death Index.
  2. The count of film credits is based loosely on the Internet Film DataBase. Several of Steinkamp's credits are as a "supervising editor".
  3. McNary, Dave (February 6, 2001). "Frazen, Steinkamp ACE'd, Pollack to be presenter". Variety. Retrieved 2009-09-13.