Freemasons' Tavern

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Watercolour of the Freemasons' Tavern by John Nixon circa 1800 Freemasons' Tavern.jpg
Watercolour of the Freemasons' Tavern by John Nixon circa 1800

The Freemasons' Tavern was established in 1775 at 61-65 Great Queen Street. It served as a meeting place for a variety of notable organisations from the eighteenth century until it was demolished to make way for the Connaught Hotel in 1909.

Great Queen Street street in the West End of central London in England

Great Queen Street is a street in the West End of central London in England. It is a continuation of Long Acre from Drury Lane to Kingsway. It runs from 1 to 44 along the north side, east to west, and 45 to about 80 along the south side, west to east. The street straddles and connects the Covent Garden and Holborn districts and is in the London Borough of Camden. It is numbered B402.

In 1769, the Grand Lodge decided to build a Central Hall. A building was purchased in Great Queen Street in 1775 and Thomas Sandby was tasked with building a hall in the garden. The original house became the tavern with a second house providing office space for the Freemasons.

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Thomas Sandby British artist

Thomas Sandby was an English draughtsman, watercolour artist, architect and teacher. In 1743 he was appointed private secretary to the Duke of Cumberland, who later appointed him Deputy Ranger of Windsor Great Park, where he was responsible for considerable landscaping work.

The hall

Meeting in the Hall of the Freemason's Tavern, London with sign language for deaf and dumb people, published in the Illustrated London News, 23 January 1875 Deaf and Dumb event at Freemason's Tavern.jpg
Meeting in the Hall of the Freemason's Tavern, London with sign language for deaf and dumb people, published in the Illustrated London News, 23 January 1875

The hall was not only used for Masonic purposes, but also became an important venue in London for a variety of meetings and concerts. [1]

Organisations using the hall included:

The African Institution was founded in 1807 after British abolitionists succeeded in ending the slave trade based in the United Kingdom. The Institution was formed to succeed where the former Sierra Leone Company had failed—to create a viable, civilized refuge for freed slaves in Sierra Leone, Africa.

Anti-Slavery Society everyday name of two different British organisations

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Freemasons' Hall, London: A History". History of Freemasonry. Library and Museum Charitable Trust of the United Grand Lodge of England. Retrieved 19 July 2016.
    • Balfour, R.A.C. (1990–92). "The Highland and Island Emigration Society, 1852–1858". Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness. LVII: 440.