French frigate Gentille (1778)

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Civil and Naval Ensign of France.svgFlag of French-Navy-Revolution.svgFlag of the Kingdom of France (1814-1830).svgFrance
NameGentille
Namesake"nice"
Ordered17 August 1779
BuilderSaint-Malo [1]
Laid downJuly 1777
Launched18 June 1778
In serviceAugust 1778
Captured11 April 1795
General characteristics [2]
Class and type Iphigénie-class frigate
Tons burthen620 tonnes
Length44.2 metres
Beam11.2 metres
Sail plan Full-rigged ship
Armament32 guns

Gentille was an Iphigénie-class 32-gun frigate of the French Navy.

Contents

French service

In 1779, Gentille was under Mengaud de la Haye. On 17 August 1779, she and Junon, under Bernard de Marigny, captured the 64-gun HMS Ardent. [1]

On 19 February 1781, in Chesapeake Bay, Gentille took part in the capture of the 44-gun HMS Romulus, along with the 64-gun Éveillé, the frigate Surveillante, and the cutter Guêpe, captured her in Chesapeake Bay. [1] [3] In September, she ferried troops from Annapolie to James River, in support of the Siege of Yorktown. [1]

During the War of the First Coalition, Gentille cruised the Atlantic under Lieutenant Canon. She was captured by the 74-gun HMS Hannibal and Robust in the action of 10 April 1795. [1]

Fate

Gentille was broken up in 1802. [2]

Notes, citations, and references

Notes

    Citations

    1. 1 2 3 4 5 Roche (2005), p. 223.
    2. 1 2 Roche (2005), p. 224.
    3. Roche (2005), p. 386.

    References


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