French ship Royal Louis (1780)

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Republicain gorunded on Mingant rock-Pierre Ozanne.jpg
Républicain grounded on Mingant rock. Drawing by Pierre Ozanne.
History
Flag of the Kingdom of France (1814-1830).svg Flag of French-Navy-Revolution.svg France
Name:Royal Louis
Namesake: Louis of France
Builder: Brest Dockyard [1]
Laid down: 8 March 1779 [1]
Launched: 20 March 1780 [1]
Completed: June 1780 [1]
Commissioned: June 1780 [1]
Renamed:Républicain (29 September 1792) [1]
Fate: wrecked, 24 December 1794
General characteristics
Class and type: 106-gun ship of the line
Tonnage: 2,400 tonnes [1]
Displacement: 4,835 tonnes [1]
Length: 60.4 metres [1]
Beam: 16.2 metres [1]
Draught: 8.6 metres [1]
Depth of hold: 24½ French feet
Complement: 1,150 [1]
Armament:
  • 106 guns
  • 30 x 48-pounders on the lower deck [Note 1]
  • 32 x 24-pounders on the middle deck
  • 32 x 12-pounders on the upper deck
  • 12 x 8-pounders on the quarterdeck and forecastle
  • 4 more 8-pounders were added in 1784 [Note 2]
Armour: timber

Royal Louis was a 110-gun ship of the line of the French Royal Navy. She was designed and built at Brest Dockyard by Léon-Michel Guignace.

Career

In 1780, Royal Louis was under Beaussier de Chateauvert. [2] She took part in the Battle of Cape Spartel on 20 October 1782 under Beausset, with Verdun de La Crenne as flag captain, although she did not engage. [3]

She was renamed Républicain in September 1792. Under this name, she took part in the Third Battle of Ushant, being the last ship of the French rear. She was attacked, totally dismasted, and struck her colours; however, the British failed to possession, and she returned to Rochefort. [1]

On 24 December 1794, she took part in the Croisière du Grand Hiver. As the fleet exited Brest harbour, she ran aground with the loss of 10 men. Her crew abandoned ship, and the wreck was destroyed in a tempest a few days later. [1]

Sources and references

Notes

  1. The 48-pounders were replaced by 36-pounders on 1782.
  2. 4 more 8-pounders were added here in 1786, but these were replaced by 4 x 36-pounder obusiers in 1794

Citations

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Roche (2005), p. 388.
  2. Taillemite (1982), p. 28.
  3. Lacour-Gayet (1905), p. 448.

References


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