Fujisankei Classic

Last updated
Fujisankei Classic
Tournament information
Location Fujikawaguchiko, Yamanashi
Established1973
Course(s)Fujizakura Country Club
Par71
Length7,566 yards (6,918 m)
Tour(s) Japan Golf Tour
Format Stroke play
Prize fund ¥110 million
Month playedSeptember
Tournament record score
Aggregate267 Todd Hamilton (2003)
267 Paul Sheehan (2004)
To par−17 as above
Current champion
Flag of Japan.svg Rikuya Hoshino
Location Map
Japan natural location map with side map of the Ryukyu Islands.jpg
Map symbol golf course 02.png
Fujizakura CC
Location in Japan
Yamanashi geolocalisation relief.svg
Map symbol golf course 02.png
Fujizakura CC

The Fujisankei Classic (フジサンケイクラシック, Fuji sankei kurashikku) is a professional golf tournament on the Japan Golf Tour. It was first played in 1973 at the Takasaka Country Club (Yoneyama Course). The tournament moved to the Higashi-Matsuyama Golf Club in 1979 and to the Kawana Hotel's Fuji course in 1981. The tournament has been held at the Fujizakura Country Club in Yamanashi Prefecture since 2005. The prize fund in 2019 was ¥110,000,000, with ¥22,000,000 going to the winner. The title sponsor is the Fujisankei Communications Group.

Contents

Tournament hosts

YearsVenueLocation
2005–presentFujizakura Country Club Fujikawaguchiko, Yamanashi
1981–2004Kawana Hotel (Fuji Course) Itō, Shizuoka
1979–1980Higashi Matsuyama Country Club Higashimatsuyama, Saitama
1973–1978Takasaka Country Club (Yoneyama Course)Higashimatsuyama, Saitama

Winners

YearWinnerScoreTo ParMargin of
victory
Runner(s)-upRef
2020 Flag of Japan.svg Rikuya Hoshino 275−9Playoff Flag of Japan.svg Mikumu Horikawa
2019 Flag of South Korea.svg Park Sang-hyun 269−152 strokes Flag of South Korea.svg Choi Ho-sung
Flag of Japan.svg Hiroshi Iwata
2018 Flag of Japan.svg Rikuya Hoshino 268−165 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Shugo Imahira
2017 Flag of South Korea.svg Ryu Hyun-woo 281−3Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Seungsu Han
Flag of Japan.svg Satoshi Kodaira
2016 Flag of South Korea.svg Cho Min-gyu 277−73 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Ryo Ishikawa
Flag of Japan.svg Daisuke Kataoka
Flag of Japan.svg Daisuke Maruyama
Flag of Japan.svg Tadahiro Takayama
2015 Flag of South Korea.svg Kim Kyung-tae 275−91 stroke Flag of South Korea.svg Lee Kyoung-hoon
2014 Flag of Japan.svg Hiroshi Iwata 274−101 stroke Flag of South Korea.svg Hur In-hoi
2013 Flag of Japan.svg Hideki Matsuyama 275−9Playoff Flag of South Korea.svg Park Sung-joon
Flag of Japan.svg Hideto Tanihara
2012 Flag of South Korea.svg Kim Kyung-tae 276−81 stroke Flag of Japan.svg Yuta Ikeda
2011 Flag of Japan.svg Masatsugu Morofuji 136 [lower-alpha 1] −63 strokes Flag of Singapore.svg Mardan Mamat
2010 Flag of Japan.svg Ryo Ishikawa 275−9Playoff Flag of Japan.svg Shunsuke Sonoda
2009 Flag of Japan.svg Ryo Ishikawa 272−125 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Daisuke Maruyama
2008 Flag of Japan.svg Toyokazu Fujishima 271−13Playoff Flag of Japan.svg Hiroshi Iwata
2007 Flag of Japan.svg Hideto Tanihara 205 [lower-alpha 2] −83 strokes Flag of Thailand.svg Prayad Marksaeng
2006 Flag of Japan.svg Shingo Katayama 274−103 strokes Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Liang Wenchong
2005 Flag of Japan.svg Daisuke Maruyama 271−137 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Shingo Katayama
2004 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Paul Sheehan 267−174 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Mitsuhiro Tateyama
Flag of Japan.svg Kaname Yokoo
2003 Flag of the United States.svg Todd Hamilton 267−175 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Tetsuji Hiratsuka
Flag of Japan.svg Shigeru Nonaka
2002 Flag of Japan.svg Nobuhito Sato 276−8Playoff Flag of Australia (converted).svg Scott Laycock
2001 Flag of the Philippines.svg Frankie Miñoza 276−81 stroke Flag of Japan.svg Tsukasa Watanabe
2000 Flag of Japan.svg Tateo Ozaki 278−61 stroke Flag of Japan.svg Nobuhito Sato
Flag of the Republic of China.svg Yeh Chang-ting
1999 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Shigemasa Higaki 273−112 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Steven Conran
1998 Flag of Paraguay.svg Carlos Franco 275−91 stroke Flag of the Republic of China.svg Chen Tze-chung
1997 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Kenichi Kuboya 279−51 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Yoshinori Kaneko
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki
1996 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Brian Watts 272−12Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Todd Hamilton
1995 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tsuneyuki Nakajima 272−122 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masahiro Kuramoto
1994 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Kiyoshi Murota 284E4 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Nobuo Serizawa
1993 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 270−144 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Todd Hamilton
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tsukasa Watanabe
1992 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Hiroshi Makino 281−33 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Saburo Fujiki
1991 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Saburo Fujiki 279−5Playoff Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Brian Jones
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Hideki Kase
1990 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 208 [lower-alpha 2] −51 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Saburo Fujiki
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masanobu Kimura
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tōru Nakamura
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Naomichi Ozaki
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Yoshitaka Yamamoto
1989 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 282−22 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Katsunari Takahashi
1988 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Ikuo Shirahama 280−42 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Nobumitsu Yuhara
1987 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 275−92 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh
1986 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 279−51 stroke Flag of the United States.svg David Ishii
1985 Flag of the United States.svg Mark O'Meara 273−113 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki
1984 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tateo Ozaki 280−4Playoff Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsieh Min-Nan
1983 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Nobumitsu Yuhara 287+31 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masahiro Kuramoto [1]
1982 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tsuneyuki Nakajima 277−7Playoff Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh
1981 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Toshiharu Kawada 276−82 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki [2]
1980 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 283−51 stroke Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Takahiro Takeyasu
[3]
1979 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Shoichi Sato 283−51 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki [4]
1978 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Kosaku Shimada 278−103 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki [5]
1977 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Yasuhiro Miyamoto 287−11 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Yoshitaka Yamamoto [6]
1976 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Norio Suzuki 279−9Playoff Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Liang-Huan
1975 Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Liang-Huan 280−84 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh [7]
1974 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh 276−121 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tōru Nakamura [8]
1973 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh 272−161 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tōru Nakamura [9]
  1. Tournament played over 36 holes.
  2. 1 2 Tournament played over 54 holes.

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References

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